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20 months old and not speaking words - Page 2

post #21 of 50
50 words by 24 months is typically the gauge used by speech pathologists (speaking as one) as a baseline. other factors are very important, however. hearing test is typically number 1. then family history. if you or dh didn't start talking until later, chances are, he's a late talker. If he's frustrated, however, therapy is typically recommended. frustration shows an awareness of communication difficulties and should be addressed.

sign language is an excellent place to start, especially if he's showing frustration. it bridges the gap to verbal language beautifully and really enhances communication in general. we signed with dd when she was preverbal and it saved us when she was 2.5 and had chronic fluid in her ears with a moderate hearing loss.

here are some resources:

http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/c...art/page1.html

http://www.comeunity.com/disability/...uidelines.html

http://www.shop-in-service.com/verbal_apraxia.htm

i'm not saying have him evaluated or not. go with your gut. pediatricians are not the experts in this area, but i don't know how the process works in BC and you may need to get a referral from the ped. he may be a late talker, he may need some help- it's a tough call when they're this young!
post #22 of 50
My ds is 20 months. Last month he said his first word. Uh oh. This month he says "ma" correctly. He kinda says da? for dog but thats also kinda the same as his babbles. Thats it!! I am NOT worried. He speaks baby language, babbles, uses low and high tones like a normal hearing person. He uses sign language to get his NEEDS across. He does however use my hands sometimes when he is exploring or wants me to do something specific. Although I am not worried I guess I should call the dr. and get an eval. but I am not going to even THINK about starting therapys, jumping through hoops, or driving 500 miles a week to go to a ton of stuff thats a joke. I don't need that crap right now and I also agree that so much crap is being over diagnosed right now. And if its not being overdiagnosed then I am afraid of where this country is headed with health and mental issues.....

So from someone who has read the posts and is in the same boat thats what I am going to do.
post #23 of 50
My son is the same age as yours and is now in Early Intervention for delayed verbal (he tested about 12 months on the verbal scale.)

He started speaking at 12 months (used four words consistently) but the words disappeared at 14 months and he hasn't spoken since.

I would say, to set your mind at ease, get him evaluated. The folks at EI are very nice and will teach you a few tricks to get him communicating.
post #24 of 50
My son only said animal sounds and "mama" consistently at 20 months. Then in the last month or 2, he suddenly had this language explosion! He's still not using words in context much (except animal sounds - he'll moo if he sees a cow, etc... we live on a farm), but he will say just about anything we ask him to repeat, unless he isn't capable of saying the first letter of the word (I honestly think he's a perfectionist).

It's just amazing what he's learned to say recently, when just a few months ago, I was wondering if he'd ever talk!!! I have an autistic nephew, so that thought was always in the back of my mind, even though DS shows NO signs of autism otherwise (and the autism comes from DN's father, who is unrelated to DS). He just wasn't talking yet, but he was babbling (which my nephew didn't do much at that age). I think DS just wanted to be able to say things correctly before he tried really saying them.

The things he now says in context include "Hey kitty kitty" and "I'm gonna getchyou!" (as he comes after me to tickle me - as I do to him). That last one is more like "Uh Go Geh Goo", but it's obvious what he's saying when he does his fingers like the claws that are about to attack.

He's not asking for things yet. He still says "Uh! Uh!" and points (I call it pointing and grunting - such a man!). But I'm starting to finally get him to say something before I hand him what he wants. Like if he wants milk, I'll either have him say "milk" or say "please". Right now, "please" is easier to get out of him. A few months ago, he would NOT say anything when asked in these situations - he'd just fuss about it. I'm trying to now teach him that saying words will get him what he wants, not fussing.
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by idocrase
....... I was worried worried worried, but my Dr. wasn't. But I could sense that B was different than the other toddlers in her room at daycare.....


You see? I am so with you on listening to your own gut!
Every single time I thought something was wrong with my DD, I WAS RIGHT. When I thought she was delayed developmentally at 4 months, I was right. (Thankfully, it was an easy fix.) When I thought something was making her sick that had to do with feeding-- I was right. (She had reflux. The doctors blew me off at first because they thought it was just cause I was a new mother or she had colic.) When I thought she wasn't eating enough and had lost weight-- I was right. So I'm a real believer in going with my gut. People will tell you your baby is okay, okay, okay......but you must be the final judge!

Faith
post #26 of 50
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone. I have made an appointment with my family doctor. I don't know if our system is the same as in the US, but certainly I don't have to pay for this. If I do decide to go privately, that's not a problem. But my family doctor must make a referral to any speech therapist or specialist.

I never bothered to teach signs, and of course now I'm kicking myself. I will start searching and figuring out the best way to do this. It might put my mind at ease to know how much he is capable of. I do think he is not just reading "body language" because he will hear me say bath when I'm not even looking at him and go running to the bathroom. He loves baths, lol.

Honestly, I was never worried. He's been on the late side of normal in so many things. He didn't sit up until he was six months old, didn't walk until 14 months. He doesn't do animal sounds. He does babble, and he can certainly change the pitch of his voice. But really, he has zero words. Not even mama. He doesn't use my hands to do things, he just takes my hand and leads me - for example if he wants to nurse or snuggle and I'm in the kitchen he'll come over and take my hand and lead me over to the sofa. Or if he wants a movie he'll lead me to the DVD player.

Anyways, the appointment is made and we'll go from there. In the meantime I will start with the signing. If anyone has a quick link to a "how to" page, or a book recommendation, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks again, ladies. This is hard, even though I know whatever it is he'll be just fine.
post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhinderliter
......but I am not going to even THINK about starting therapys, jumping through hoops, or driving 500 miles a week to go to a ton of stuff thats a joke. I don't need that crap right now and I also agree that so much crap is being over diagnosed right now. And if its not being overdiagnosed then I am afraid of where this country is headed with health and mental issues.....

So from someone who has read the posts and is in the same boat thats what I am going to do.
I don't know about where you are-- but when I contacted EI, the physical therapist came to my house each week, and the cost was dirt cheap, because it's gov't subsidized. I paid on a sliding scale....in my case, my husband earns quite a bit and it was still only $40 a month! I was happy to have the lady come, if only because I was a new mom, and it gave me a fellow mom to talk to every week. And not just any fellow mom-- but a mom who had seen a lot of kids in a lot of developmental stages. For me it was like a weekly, private "Mommy and Me" class where I learned stuff that helped my daughter progress. And as I said before-- by the time we were done, my daughter was way ahead of schedule on the developmental charts. And she's been flying forward ever since.

Sorry, but I just don't see the harm in having someone come to your house to show you how you can encourage a child to talk. If in your case, you live somewhere where you'd have to drive a long distance because there are no therapists in your neighborhood, wow....I'm sorry for the inconvenience. And I imagine if your gut isn't bothering you, then you're probably right about your child. But it doesn't mean your choice is right for every child.

Faith
post #28 of 50
Thread Starter 
Just wanted to remind y'all that not everybody here lives in America. If anyone in Canada has any experience with how it works, let me know.

post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piglet68
......I never bothered to teach signs, and of course now I'm kicking myself. I will start searching and figuring out the best way to do this. I will start with the signing. If anyone has a quick link to a "how to" page, or a book recommendation, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks again, ladies. This is hard, even though I know whatever it is he'll be just fine.

Consider getting the DVD called "Talking Hands." My DD loves this, and she not only imitates the signs from the video, she imitates the words too! She's 17 months, and despite my saying "Granddaddy, Grandmother" to her for ages, she said and signed those words because she saw the kid on the video do it!!! LOL! Also, check out the video clips on www.signingtime.com, and goodle for ASL dictionary web sites.

Otherwise, my advice to get siging quickly? Look on the internet for a free, online ASL dictionary, then choose 3 signs to start with. Choose three words you use a lot and that are important to your child-- like "eat" "milk" "change" (for change diaper), or "dog," "ball," "cookie." Whatever he's crazy about and needs a lot every day. Within days you might see your son signing something like "cookie" to let you know he wants one. Then, you are on your way! Don't feel pressured to learn a lot of signs quickly. He can only learn so many at a time. So just learn new ones and teach them in batches of 2 and 3 at a time, as the older signs are mastered.


Good luck!

Faith
post #30 of 50
My ds sounds similar to yours. He is 21 months now, and we just took him to his speech asessment 2weeks ago. it was a wonderful and positive experience. The therapist was so respectful of my son's sensitive temperament and he totally warmed up to her. Ds is a prety quiet guy, but the therapist showed me how to take the sounds he was making and turn them into words. If he says, "uh" I can change that into "up", and this may prompt ds to start using "uh" as his word for "up". It really works! he has added at least 4 words since we started this. He never said, "mom" before. Then one night Dh was holding him and he made the sound "ma-ma-ma" and I went running over to him all excited (even though I knew he didn't mean to say "mama")and said, "did you say, mama?" then I turned my back until he said it again. We made it into a game and now he uses "mama" to call me all the time.
Quote:
I never bothered to teach signs, and of course now I'm kicking myself. I will start searching and figuring out the best way to do this.
We didn't use signs either. The therapist recommended that I start with 5 signs, and she also told me that she doesn't recommend it for kids younger than 18 months, so don't worry. We have ben doing the sign for "cracker" and Ds picked it up in a week. I need to learn some more now!

Keep me posted on how your assessment goes!
post #31 of 50
when I worked in a daycare we had a little guy that had an older sister (much older) and he didnt say much of anything. We talked to his mom about prompting him to speak and giving him responsibility (helping to pick up, throw away his own things, go get his own coat, go get his own shoes) and within a month or two, he was speaking more. His sister was 10 and it seemed to me that they did a lot of things for him rather than allowing him to do things he COULD do for himself. So he just kind of became a bit lazy on the uptake of words and had settled into his role as the baby of the family. He was a very different little boy and we definately had worries that there were other things going on. However, after our meeting with his mother, things just went constantly uphill and he really blossomed... never actually needing intervention. It was very interesting... just thought I would share.....
post #32 of 50
oh!! we used Babysigns.... it was a great book and a little more simple than ASL. I actually did use signs with my kids starting at 6mo and they had both dropped the signs by 14mo and used the words for the signs instead, but its never too late to start! Most common signs for my kids were eat, more, up, fan, cup, kitty........ we only used a few before they started talking. At 18mo it is likely that he will pick up the signs quickly. I used them in the daycare i worked at in the toddler room. The kids had no problem learning the signs.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamajessica
50 words!!! by 20 months. Wow. My DD is 17 months and has 3 words. I can't really imagine her saying 47 more words in the next 3 months, but maybe.
Same here! 50 words?! Ani can say dada, mama and baby (bee-bee ).
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piglet68
Anyways, the appointment is made and we'll go from there. In the meantime I will start with the signing. If anyone has a quick link to a "how to" page, or a book recommendation, I'd appreciate it.
www.signwithme.com
I go to it when I want to look up a new sign for ds.


Quote:
Originally Posted by idocrase
Double yeah that! on not trying to diagnose (or rule out) a hearing problem on your own.
That it interesting to me. I guess those things satisfied me, because I *knew* that there was nothing wrong. So maybe it just does come down to instincts and how you feel.
I wasn't saying to rely on those things, just to see what happened. I wouldn't think that anyone who was thinking about speech eval would NOT go do it just because they whispered and talked without gesturing, and dc responded properly. lol.
Like I said, I wasn't worried, just kinda wondered "what if..." ya know. And knowing that he could do those things helped put my mind at ease even more. But I had never seriously considered speech therapy for more than 2 seconds.

And I don't know if there is anything to this, but EVERYBODY (except my stupid pedi. She wanted speech therapy at 18 mos.- there's a bunch of reasons I don't like her) said that ds was perfectly fine, and they all think that there is absolutely no reason to worry. He'd just talk late. And I don't think it was just to make me feel better. So perhaps there is something to other people's perceptions of our kids. kwim?
post #35 of 50
Piglet, you can have my copy of Sign with Your Baby (and the quick reference card) if you like -- I had a VHS as well, but I'm not sure where it is.. I'll keep looking if you'd like it, we don't even have a VHS player anymore.

http://www.sign2me.com/

Nicki
post #36 of 50
Hi, I haven't read all the posts yet. But -- to the OP: My DS is 13 months old and hasn't said one word. Two pediatricians showed concern upon learning this information. I had his hearing tested and now he is being referred to a speech therapist. I posted about this problem one month ago in "Life with a Babe" and most people seemed to think it wasn't too big of a problem, but that getting a consult "couldn't hurt." I am doing the therapy eval for peace of mind. My DS had ear infections & ear tubes, so that could play a role, too.

In terms of a hearing test, all they did was put us in a booth and see if he responded to voices within the booth. It was nothing elaborate or fancy, as I expected.

I have heard that boys speak later than girls, but I don't know if that is true or not?
post #37 of 50
Piglet,

I also encourage you to have him evaluated. It is within the norms, but it would not hurt to check if there is a problem with his hearing.

I also know of a boy that needed his tonsils removed at 3 years. He did not speak until they were removed because the size was impairing his speach.

It may be nothing, but why not check?
post #38 of 50
Book recommendation: Sign With Your Baby by Robert Garcia
(I believe his was one of the first books on signing with your baby, and he promotes American Sign Language based signs, with some slight modifications for handshapes that may be difficult to duplicate with little hands.)

Update when you can after the doctor's appointment and any referrals!

~claudia
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboClaudia
Book recommendation: Sign With Your Baby by Robert Garcia
It's actually Joseph Garcia, and this is the one I have and can give you.

Nicki
post #40 of 50
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much, all of you. Sharing your stories and your support is so wonderful. I'm not afraid of the therapy, especially after hearing so many positive stories. Heck, it might be an excuse to focus on DS a bit more (second child just never gets the same as the first one, eh?).

I'll keep you all posted, and thanks for the great signing links!
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