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Reason #1001 to homeschool

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
A friend of the family used to be an elementary school teacher. She taught for 33 years and says she loved every minute of it, except for the parts she complains about!
Anyway, my mom loaned her the book The DaVinci code. She said she couldn't get into it, that it was dull. Then she said that honestly she thinks reading is boring. This is not the kind of person I want influencing my children's reading habits. How on earth could reading be boring???
She tutors middle school kids in math now but can't estimate percentage discounts when she's out shopping.
How do these people get to be teachers?

Suzy
post #2 of 47
Oh wow. She taught ELEMENTARY School and thinks reading is BORING!

That is downright SCARY!!!


As for the estimating sale prices, seriously? Maybe things have changed since she was teaching, y aknow, before they had math, and books.

weird.
post #3 of 47
I am an elementary school teacher and I LOVE reading. You probably shouldn't teach elementary if you don't at least like it, because that's a pretty hard thing to fake.

As far as the math tutoring goes, I think it's fine that she can't estimate percentages. I assume if she had to teach a student how to do that then she'd learn.

I have no problem telling my students that there are some things I don't know how to do. While I have a certain curriculum I have to teach them, I think that my main job is to keep them interested in questioning and learning.

Sorry to crash your forum! I read here, though, because HS'ing is an option I might pursue one day (ds is only 10 months now).
post #4 of 47
Quote:
As far as the math tutoring goes, I think it's fine that she can't estimate percentages. I assume if she had to teach a student how to do that then she'd learn.
I can't believe a middle school math tutor doesn't ever have to do percentages.
post #5 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mallory
I can't believe a middle school math tutor doesn't ever have to do percentages.
Yes, I agree with that. I guess my reaction to the whole issue is that teachers can learn and subsequently teach concepts but can't convey a passion if they don't possess it themselves.
post #6 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by trini
As far as the math tutoring goes, I think it's fine that she can't estimate percentages. I assume if she had to teach a student how to do that then she'd learn.
Wow. This is something I do at least weekly, to figure out sale prices or tips. It's not something like, oh, solving a quadratic function (which I also think is fun but which you don't encounter often in day-to-day life). IMO, someone who can't do this is not truly comfortable with how numbers work - she doesn't speak the language of mathematics - and so I don't see how she can impart this familiarity to others...

dar
post #7 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinky Tuscadero
A friend of the family used to be an elementary school teacher. She taught for 33 years and says she loved every minute of it, except for the parts she complains about!
Anyway, my mom loaned her the book The DaVinci code. She said she couldn't get into it, that it was dull. Then she said that honestly she thinks reading is boring. This is not the kind of person I want influencing my children's reading habits. How on earth could reading be boring???
She tutors middle school kids in math now but can't estimate percentage discounts when she's out shopping.
How do these people get to be teachers?

Suzy
Unfair to judge that book just plain sucks!:
I'll bet she enjoys reading other books.
post #8 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckyTate
Unfair to judge that book just plain sucks!:
I'll bet she enjoys reading other books.
You are not clear?? She's talking about the "reading is boring" part rather than the person's opinion of the DaVinci code. Well, I guess also the possibility that the only reason the person didn't find the DaVinci Code interesting appears to be that she thinks reading is boring. Kwim?
post #9 of 47
Thread Starter 
These are just two recent examples. Her overall attitude is so bad about learning. She thinks getting her daily automated horoscope emailed to her counts as reading. I just don't understand how people can think they are teaching kids anything when they have these kinds of attitudes. I know that she can't be the only one like this.
About percentages-I think that's pretty basic, everyday stuff. A teacher shouldn't have to re-learn this. It's not like it's an uncommon skill. She should be using it all them time. She has no clue how much something is going to cost if it's, say, 20% off. I'm not talking exact numbers here, just rough estimates.
I just can't get over that she was a teacher for 33 years. She was paid very well for all those years, she's still collecting retirement from the county, and she doesn't know such basic skills. What are we paying these people to do, anyway?
No public school for us, no way!
S
post #10 of 47
I agree the enthusiasm in school is in need of a boost by most teachers but it is not that scary that a teacher doesn't like to read for pleasure maby she is a people person and likes to talk....I have met many teachers like that some even have trouble concentrating and staying on task! Just being positive this morning!
post #11 of 47
I went to school with hundreds of elementary education teachers, and all I can say is this: I'm not remotely surprised.
post #12 of 47
My DH's best friend doesn't like to read. He never reads for pleasure, and only reads what is necessary for work, etc. He watches movies and plays video games for fun. I don't think he even reads news online much.

He certainly isn't a school teacher, though! He's in sales.

As for not being able to figure percentages...I'd hate to be the server that woman tips badly! And how does she ever know if she's being overcharged?
post #13 of 47
My dh doesn't really like to read; he thought about becoming a (high school) teacher when he was in uni. He's smart and did very well in school, can write very well, has a large vocabulary, etc. He just has a hard time sitting and reading. He likes watching "educational" tv shows about history and big machines and such. I don't think his problem with reading is that it's boring, though; I think he feels like there are so many things that need to be done that if he has the energy to sit and read, he should be doing them instead, whereas when he's sitting and watching tv, he's too tired even to read He has read more in the last few weeks than he did throughout high school; we've started reading the Harry Potter books out loud and he'll sit and read for a couple of hours in the evening. I just about fell over when he offered to read and then started doing it regularly. He also reads slowly, and I think that frustrates him. I read faster than he does, and I get frustrated when I'm reading an interesting/exciting part of a book out loud, because it's so s-l-o-w.

I agree that overall, the level of voluntary illiteracy in our society is alarming; at the same time, I can see on an individual level that not everyone who doesn't read is scary.
post #14 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinky Tuscadero
A friend of the family used to be an elementary school teacher. She taught for 33 years and says she loved every minute of it, except for the parts she complains about!
Anyway, my mom loaned her the book The DaVinci code. She said she couldn't get into it, that it was dull. Then she said that honestly she thinks reading is boring. This is not the kind of person I want influencing my children's reading habits. How on earth could reading be boring???
She tutors middle school kids in math now but can't estimate percentage discounts when she's out shopping.
How do these people get to be teachers?

Suzy
Because most teachers come from the lowest quartile of standardized test-takers in college (the standardized tests in question being the Praxis tests and the SATs). In short, the average P.E. major is probably a brighter bulb than your average teacher.

Oh, but FWIW, I thought DVC was boring too, but that's because I thought it was a simplistic version of Holy Blood, Holy Grail. I also figured out "that lead character" was descended from "that important figure" by page 56, so it really wasn't a big thrill. Sorry if I sound like a book snob. I love to read, but most fiction just annoys me, so I stick to nonfiction.
post #15 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mallory
I can't believe a middle school math tutor doesn't ever have to do percentages.
She apparently never buys things on sale or eats at restaurants.
post #16 of 47
Quote:
I went to school with hundreds of elementary education teachers, and all I can say is this: I'm not remotely surprised
My old elementary school and high school has teachers now that I went to school with. These teachers were not great students. They weren't the ones in the higher math courses or AP classes.

I think many people choose to go into teaching because it is an easy field to get into plus you have weekends and summers off.

There are some teachers out there that are incredibly passionate and dedicated to kids learning and are great teachers. But sadly there are too many teachers that aren't very good teachers and role models.
post #17 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinky Tuscadero
Anyway, my mom loaned her the book The DaVinci code. She said she couldn't get into it, that it was dull. Then she said that honestly she thinks reading is boring. This is not the kind of person I want influencing my children's reading habits. How on earth could reading be boring???
She tutors middle school kids in math now but can't estimate percentage discounts when she's out shopping.
Actually she could be a better tutor if math doesn't come too easily to her. When I was in college, I had a professor for whom things were very intuitive, and it was awful. He had NO IDEA how to explain how or why to do things. She may do fine figuring percentages on paper.

I'm a reader, but most movies bore me, and that baffles movie-lovers I know.

ZM
post #18 of 47
You think that's bad - my mom is a fifth-grade math teacher, and when she used to type up notes for the other teachers to send home with their classes (back in the days when not everyone had a computer), she had to correct the grammar of the English teacher. This teacher didn't know the difference between "their," "they're" and "there"! And she put apostrophes before the "s" in plurals. I am not kidding - I was in grade school myself and I was absolutely shocked.

I don't want to malign all teachers, because some of them are smart, wonderful people like my mom who know their subjects and care about teaching kids. But the other ones are out there too.
post #19 of 47
Quote:
I can't believe a middle school math tutor doesn't ever have to do percentages.
I gotta be really transparent here....
I cannot figure percentages.

If you say " 30% of the people do xyz".... I get that. I know what percent means... "of 100". I get an image in my head of a circle with pie wedges.

If you say "That dress is 15% off today !! " I have no idea how to figure it. At all. I've tried. I've been taught. It just doesn't stick. Or if you tell me "A generous tip is 20% of the bill"...I can't figure that.

Which is why my dh ...who has a passion for all things numbers...teaches the children math.

I agree though...that a math teacher should understand the concept before teaching a child.
post #20 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeldamomma
Actually she could be a better tutor if math doesn't come too easily to her. When I was in college, I had a professor for whom things were very intuitive, and it was awful. He had NO IDEA how to explain how or why to do things. She may do fine figuring percentages on paper.
Not if she doesn't know how to do it at all. I know someone who worked as a substitute teacher and would call my mother to get help with math answers for 5th and 6th graders. He didn't know how to do it himself, how was he supposed to teach someone else how to do it?
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