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The pool - most children drown while supervised. - Page 2

post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial
Most people assume you will HEAR a child drown, but they don't make a sound. They just sit on the bottom and wait for an adult to get them.
I almost drowned when I was about 3.5 on Cape Cod. My mom and her friend were sitting on the dock with their legs dangling in the water. I was right in front of them in the water with one of those little kiddie inner tubes around me. I slipped right through it and down I went. I didn't panic or try to get back to the surface. In fact, I remember looking at the way the sun filtered through the water and thinking how pretty it was and that the water looked prettier from underneath than it did from the top. I was just in wonder and awe at how beautiful it all was--I didn't even realize it was unsafe. Soon I felt a hand on my head--pulling me up out of the water by my hair. I was mad because it hurt AND I wanted to stay underwater where it was prettier. It is definitely true that children DON'T understand that water is dangerous. I knew I was below the surface but I didn't see a problem with it. It is a very calm and peaceful memory that I have from that day. When I tried to breathe and water came in my nose and mouth it surprised me but didn't scare me. Scary now, knowing that it was a life threatening situation and I didn't even realize it.
post #22 of 59
thanks so much for posting this!
post #23 of 59
It happens so quickly, so silently. Thanks for posting this.
post #24 of 59
There is a newspaper editor I know who is deaf who served as a lifegaurd for years as a teen.

Although some people were concerned that he could not do the job cuz he couldn't hear, he actually was able to do the job, as or even more effectively than most because DROWNING PEOPLE often don't make a sound.

Since this guy was used to relying on visual cues in life he was a really good lifeguard.
post #25 of 59
Thread Starter 
Wow that is a cool story maya.

Now who was it who was talking about going under and how everything was pretty? That story triggered a bit of total recall for me. I was in Indiana visiting family when we went to a local pool. One of my parents was sitting on an edge with feet in the water, talking to another parent in the water. I was standing next to the parent sitting, gazing dreamliy into the pool.

It looked to cool. The shimmer, the ice blue water lapping at the sides of the pool. I could see the bottom so I thought I could stand. Without warning I jumped right in and sunk to the bottom. It was less than a second than one parent reached in and pulled me up by my hair. I was angry about it, but thinking about it now what nutty-kid-like thing to do. They must have been both mad and scared!
post #26 of 59
This is all very interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maya44
There is a newspaper editor I know who is deaf who served as a lifegaurd for years as a teen.

Although some people were concerned that he could not do the job cuz he couldn't hear, he actually was able to do the job, as or even more effectively than most because DROWNING PEOPLE often don't make a sound.

Since this guy was used to relying on visual cues in life he was a really good lifeguard.
That makes SO much sense. Kids at pools make SO much noise (just as the kids in my old apartment complex, playing behind cars, giving attitude towards drivers, waiting until the last moment to break up their ball games as cars go by at 1 mph). I don't know how people can find it possible to not filter out all that noise, and I don't know how people can hear TRUE panic over all the PRETEND screams and nonsense. My mom had a simple rule. She was NOT going to allow us to randomly scream; if we did, she'd rush outside, in an absolute panic. If there was nothing obviously wrong, she'd persist in asking where the tiger was and how badly we'd been mauled. No screaming unless there was TRULY something bad happening.

Anyway, I would think a deaf person would definitely do a better job in a job like that, b/c they would never try to rely on hearing trouble start.
post #27 of 59
I know living in Florida for most of my adult life, one hears about a child drowning pretty much every week during the summertime. Because of this, there are a lot of infant swimming programs which are designed to teach a child to roll on his back or get to the side of the pool. infantswim.com is a program that has paired with the local YMCAs.

Right now, you'll see those inflatable pools on sale at Toys-R-Us and the like... both the kiddie kind and the larger ones, that are 10' or 12'. I think some people let their guard down around them because they're not "real" pools. Well, they're real enough to drown in.
post #28 of 59
Thanks for posting this. I have been debating about If I should let dd (8yrs) swim in a 4ft. pool with her friends at our community garden while I, and probably all the other parents too, garden.
I now will not let her swim unless I am right there watching.
post #29 of 59
I just have to say that the grammar of this title is DRIVING ME CRAZY.

"Most children drown while supervised" makes it sound like a majority of children have drowned, or that a majority of supervised children have drowned. MOST children have NOT drowned. The majority of children are still with us today, thank the good lord.

Apparently you mean that, "Most children who drown do so while under supervision."

And thank you for the PSA. It really is important.
post #30 of 59
Thank you again for the reminder.

Everytime this thread comes around I mention these 2 stories.

My cousin drowned in the toilet when he was 2. And my own dd went into the pool and could have drowned, with dh and I standing right there. She was face down and didn't make one sound.

She was 2, I was holding her baby sister and dh and I were standing next to the pool talking for a minute before we took the kids in. 2 year old was next to me and then suddenly I realized she wasn't standing next to me anymore and I looked around and saw her floating face down in the pool. Dh jumped in with all his clothing and shoes on and grabbed her out, she was fine. I will never forget that day. She was so quiet, an extra minute or two and she would have been gone. All these adults around and it still happened.
post #31 of 59
Thanks for posting this. I'm going to have to make dh read it. He thinks i'm being dumb when I say I refuse to take the kids to his parents pool by myself. I'm 5 feet 2 inches. When I stand in the middle the water touches my chin, at it's shallowest (besides the stairs) it hits me mid-chest. I can not move fast enough to get to a child if something happens. Therefore we do not swim without other adults or teenagers around to help watch. And mil just lets the two older ones (3 and almost 5) put arm floaties on and sits in a chair by the pool. Not ok in my book!
post #32 of 59
As others have said, thanks for posting.

My little sister almost drowned at 3 in our cousin's pool. She had been wearing a lifejacket sitting on the pool steps, but in true little kid fashion, she took it off (one knot and two buckles) to see if she could swim. Of course she couldn't. As far as I know she never made a sound. I was in the deep end of the pool and the first time I realized something was wrong was when my uncle was jumping fully clothed into the pool. My mom had to perform CPR on her and she spent overnight in the hospital.

Fortunately she is an alive, if not slightly obnoxious, sister today.
post #33 of 59
Quote:
My cousin drowned in the toilet when he was 2.
For some reason this has been a huge fear of mine ever since my first child was born. I am a total freak about keeping the bathroom door closed at all times for this very reason.
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by seren
And mil just lets the two older ones (3 and almost 5) put arm floaties on and sits in a chair by the pool. Not ok in my book!
Those things are sooo dangerous! It is too easy for a child to raise his arms up, the floaties stay up but the child's arms slide right out and the child goes down. I'm glad to hear you're not OK with them. Maybe you could get some US Coast Guard approved life jackets for them to wear when they're with her. The ones I have have many buckles that are stiff and really difficult for my strong 5yo to remove.
post #35 of 59

Drowning can be prevented...ISR

I live in Fla and knowing how often my kids are around water I chose to be proactive about the drowning issue. My children are currently enrolled in the ISR lessons. I debated on whether to do the lessons for over a year because of the behavioral type approach to the teaching and that kids do cry at the beginning lessons quite often. I have to say that having the attachment parenting lifestyle has probably affected how my toddler is taking to the lessons. He has quickly bonded to his instructor and within a few lessons is now talking calmly during the lessons. The baby is a little less pleased about the lessons, however it is overwhelming to think that if she got into water somehow that I would find her floating and crying instead of at the bottom and silent. One of the significant things that is taught is to the parents is how to supervise children around water safely, such as no phone, no chatting at the side, etc.

My friends little brother was 2 yo and died at a picnic/party poolside where tons of people were all around. She was blamed (as a young teen) for not watching him closely enough. He rode his tricycle into the pool. It is devastating to the people involved.
post #36 of 59
Thank you so much for this thread. It really made me reflect on what happened to me today.

Today I was at the pool at our apartment complex. When we arrived there were several mother with young children and a couple of dads in the pool. I jumped, turned around, and was face to face with a child who was under the water, struggling to get to the surface. She couldn't have been more than four or five. Out of reflex I just grabbed her and pulled her to the surface. She was very startled and started to cry. I looked around and could not find her parents. I started walking around the pool with her, and poor girl, she was terrifed. I finally found her mom, and there was no thank you, nothing evevn after I told her what happened. The mom kind of gave me a dirty look and went back to her business. I was so startled at how easily that could happen, even with tons of adults around. I was so sad for that little girl. It was really a wake-up call.
post #37 of 59
What a great reminder post. I've been to the pool twice with my sister & her kids. Each time one of her kids had to be pulled out of the pool b/c they were face down. The first time her oldest was face down-- we have no idea how long he was face down. Since then I've had my son and I will NOT leave his side, even in the 1 foot deep baby pool. Sadly, my sister hasn't learned her lesson and this year her daughter ended up falling in and was face down. I had to point it out to my sister who was two feet away and didn't even notice. And this was just in the baby pool!
post #38 of 59
post #39 of 59
Quote:
For some reason this has been a huge fear of mine ever since my first child was born. I am a total freak about keeping the bathroom door closed at all times for
OMG, me too!!!

You can never be too careful with children around water!! Thanks for this thread!
post #40 of 59
Wow, i hadn't realized so many people had experiences with near drowning.
Personally, my experience was...well, i don't know if you can say "positive", but clearly, it turned out okay, since it isn't my ghost typing this!
I jumped in our pool when i was about 4. My mom was inside, the only one home. I don't really know how long it was before she came out (hysterical of course) and found me, but I did not sink to the bottom and wait there...i learned to swim!! I was happily treading water and swimming around when she came out and found me. I have been able to swim ever since, apparently. I don't really remember it, i was too young. In my mind, i have just always known how to swim..i don't ever remember not being able to swim, i don't remember learning how to swim...i just remember swimming. I love to swim, Pisces that i am.
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