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Story of the world- pics or just read alound? - Page 3

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
I don't think that Moby Dick is boring, but that might be me; I've met lots of people who do find it boring, and recently read a graphic novel in which the more boring aspects of Moby Dick were a running joke. As to the writing in SotW, I don't think it's all that bad, but I did make it through two and a half "Left Behind" books before I got too sick to read on.
Ah. I see. You're a masochist. Well, to each their own. Why read a Left Behind book when you can just read a Chick tract?
post #42 of 50
Quote:
I think that if a child is only presented with reading material that is at or below their comfort level that they'll react negatively when they're presented with reading material that is challenging for them, and they won't achieve anything like their potential as readers. I'd rather see my children look at new, "out of range" material as a challenge that they can manage than something outrageous and "too hard."
What I ment was if the book is there on the table then the child is as free to read that as anything else. But if it's obvously too hard I don't think it helps any if the parent keeps on to the child to try and read it.
post #43 of 50
wow, those are hilarious... but they don't talk about the end of the world enough.
post #44 of 50
Thread Starter 
Ya know, I'm still quite amazed at how a simple little question illicited 3 pages of responses.


Since I'm the original poster... the mind set was... my dd has shown some interest in some world culture/history lately, and I was looking for something to help expose her to that. If she shows an interest in something, I like to expose her to it, to see if she has any interest there she wants to explore. (kinda like art... no interest, no interest, coloring is boring mommy, no interest, and then WHAM!!!! can't keep her from drawing if I tried... the key was just to insure she had the supplies available and seeing if she had any interest) I'd heard of SOTW, and never have seen it, so was trying to see if the book would be a fit or not. Doesn't sound like it.


We've had a hard time finding books for her lately, b/c she wants a long story, but pictures peak her imagination. We've found a few books, but it's definitely harder, b/c she is almost between phases.


As for question that came up for finding a balance, but not pushing... I leave a variety of books out. DD loves her disney books and regularly brings me those, but will also bring magic school bus, magic tree house... she has brought me 100+ page books of Little Women or Peter Pan. It's pretty obvious if the book is keeping her interest or not... she won't let me stop reading if she is enjoying it.... so long peter pan book, I had to read. Little women, we stopped on chapter six. Magic school house, I have to read the whole thing.

With my oldest, if she doesn't want to do something, she generally tells us, or makes it obvious.

Tammy
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by quaz
... she has brought me 100+ page books of Little Women or Peter Pan. It's pretty obvious if the book is keeping her interest or not... she won't let me stop reading if she is enjoying it.... so long peter pan book, I had to read. Little women, we stopped on chapter six. Magic school house, I have to read the whole thing.
Tammy, this is interesting because I had a child who was at a similar stage, once upon a time, and I thought the issue was the presence or absence of illustrations too at first. It turned out not to be, though. What it was was the complexity of the language and its subject matter. She was happy to listen to novels like "Sophie's Snail", "All-of-a-Kind Family" and "A Bear Called Paddington" (which do have a few pen & ink illustrations, but I read them to her while she listened with eyes closed in bed) where the language was not much more complex than Magic School House books and the chapters are more like linked stories than a single over-riding plot. Where there is continual development of the story from chapter to chapter, the connections are very simple. Unlike, say, Peter Pan and Little Women.

Personally, I'd put my money on the complexity of the language and the complexity of the story, rather than on the illustrations, as being the issue.

Miranda
post #46 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma
Tammy, this is interesting because I had a child who was at a similar stage, once upon a time, and I thought the issue was the presence or absence of illustrations too at first. It turned out not to be, though. What it was was the complexity of the language and its subject matter. She was happy to listen to novels like "Sophie's Snail", "All-of-a-Kind Family" and "A Bear Called Paddington" (which do have a few pen & ink illustrations, but I read them to her while she listened with eyes closed in bed) where the language was not much more complex than Magic School House books and the chapters are more like linked stories than a single over-riding plot. Where there is continual development of the story from chapter to chapter, the connections are very simple. Unlike, say, Peter Pan and Little Women.

Personally, I'd put my money on the complexity of the language and the complexity of the story, rather than on the illustrations, as being the issue.

Miranda
I think it might be both... b/c with peter pan .. fairly complex, but she wouldn't let me stop reading.... but I do consider little women or anne of greene gables to be more sophisticated. (the books were from the same series... an illustrated abridged classic... so they both were more complex, but I just consider the other two a bit more compex) At the same time.... a book without a single pictures.... NO interest no matter how easy the story.

So with her, it really is getting the right combination.
Tammy
post #47 of 50
It's interesting to me, too, because while BeanBean will listen to (and follow) long, complex stories the pictues often seem to distract him. If I show him a picture from our edition of The Secret Garden, for example, he'll want to stop and look at all of the pictuers rather than continue reading. If I read to him, I have to do all of the reading at once and let him look at the pictures afterwards.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by deeporgarten
Actually it DOES have pictures.
Sotw does not have pictures - their is an occasional line drawing, for example they have couple of examples of chinese pioctograms. THe workbook however, has some coloring pages, etc...
post #49 of 50
one thing that is nice about the sotw work book is she recommends literature that corresponds with the topic...
post #50 of 50
I just like having something about which I can find books later. So I'll read a chapter of SotW, then go to the library and find other books on the same topic (or, if the topic is not one which I deem appropriate and/or necessary, a concurrent event/topic).
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