or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Allergies › how not to have an allergic child
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

how not to have an allergic child

post #1 of 216
Thread Starter 
any info out there about what to do in pregnancy so as not to have an allergic child? I have one who is allergic to over 15 things and I don't want to have that happen again.
post #2 of 216
short answer: it is the luck of the draw. you can help minimize the baby's exposure in utero but you cannot prevent your child from being atopic.

that's the beginning of the long answer. you don't inherit allergies you inherit being atopic, which is the propensity for being allergic.

My advice to you would be to avoid nuts, peanuts and shellfish while pregnant, and milk while nursing. Make a commitment to your baby to nurse as long as he needs. Your breastmilk can help the budding immune system protect the child against over reacting to antigens. Hold off on food at ALL while the baby is under 8 months of age, if you can, and then keep the big allergens away from the child until she's nearly three.

Basically, you're trying to prevent any food challenges to an immune system you KNOW by experience will be prone to over-reacting. Let the child develop without any major allergy freakouts until he's old enough (most allergist suggest three years old) to withstand it without it becoming a big problem.

This is what I did with babies two and three, and number two has outgrown initial positives to corn, egg and milk. Baby three shows some sensitivities to soymilk, but has never had so much as a speck of eczema. dd1 remains anaphylactic to peanuts, walnuts and pecans, tests positive to shrimp, but has outgrown her allergies to soy, egg, corn, milk, and some other things.
post #3 of 216
I have been wondering the same thing and hope to have my answer in a few months LOL

My son Aiden is allergic to wheat, barley, soy, egg and peanuts (we aren't sure yet about tree nuts yet).

With this pregnancy I have tried to eat a variety of things - no excessive wheat consumption (tried to balance with other grains and rice). I have avoided peanuts (something I didn't do with my first pregnancy - in fact, I thought peanut butter was a good protein substitute until I read in my 7 mo that it could cause allergies). I have probably had tree nuts just a few times. I do have milk products, but in limited quantities. But first and foremost, I have severely limited the amount of soy in my diet. I have read in numerous places that it can be related to peanut allergies. All in all, as a family we are eating much less processed food because of Aiden's allergies and I hope they will be of benefit to our newest arrival.

I agree with the PP that it really is a spin on the Genetic Wheel of Fortune and with our family history, I think our wheel may be defective! Now, having said all of that - I have two fears. The first being that this child will have allergies that are opposite of Aiden's - I think meal time is difficult as is now! The other being, that no matter what I do - this child will have a peanut allergy. I complain about allergies, but it's the possible ana reactions that have me scared to death!

I will fill you in as I learn and good luck!

PS There is also the school of thought that if you introduce them to grain cereals before the recommended 6 mo of age that they will be less likely allergic to them. However, the one article I read did not mention if the children were being breastfed or not. Because children that are breastfed are generally exposed to grains unless parent is on elim diet.
post #4 of 216
I did A LOT of research on this after my older ds's allergies became apparent. He was allergic to rice, oats, and wheat and has had a late-phase skin test reaction to peanut. His reactions were all late-phase gastro. He has outgrown wheat and oats, is rather afraid of rice, and has had 1 peanut butter cookie. He is 6.5.

You might want to contact FAAN, also look at POFAK online. PM me if you need more info re: those 2, but you should be able to find them both online. POFAK is a great resource, btw.

I followed (this was 4 years ago, so things may have changed!) a no peanuts/tree nuts/fish/shellfish/limited dairy, egg, and wheat diet while pg with ds2. I already ate limited rice due to ds1's allergy.

Well, to prove the crapshoot, ds2 ended up reacting to the following things through breastmilk: dairy, tomato, potato, possibly chocolate. My diet was hugely made up of tomato and potato--I probably ate at least 1, if not both, every day! He can now eat cheese, cooked tomato, potatoes, and chocolate. He has had 1 bite of raw tomato. He is 3.5. Neither ds will drink milk.

If we do it again, I will eliminate/limit those foods most likely to cause anaphylaxis, and maybe try to rotate my diet a bit more, but we assume another would have allergies, based on family history! Try yoour best, but don't feel like a failure if it doesn't work. We can't control genes!
post #5 of 216
I've also read that for reasons that they haven't entirely figured out yet, babies born my c-section have a higher rate of allergies and asthma.

-Angela
post #6 of 216
Our ped suggested that you let your kids get dirty, have fun, if something falls on the floor don't rush to clean it off, eating a little dirt is good, basically make their immune system work, breastfeed, delay solids, etc etc etc...

My DS(2) had excema when he was born, honest to God...and he still does today, and he has/had asthma like response (stupid term imo) to colds but seems to be outgrowing that, hasn't needed albuterol since November...

My DD (4 in september) was breast fed till about 3 weeks ago, didn't start solids till she was 11 months old, didn't eat them on a daily basis till 15 months old, etc etc etc...when we did start solids she was allergic to 3 out of the first 6 things...she had seasonal allergies her first summer at 8 months old...and just las week she was diagnosed with asthma. Luckily though it's all either minor or she outgrew it (the food allergies, in which only one was severe)...but still...

I have severe allergies and asthma, DH has hay fever and excercise induced asthma, so we expected it, but we tried our hardest to avoid it, it just didn't seem to work.
post #7 of 216
I loved our ped in CHarleston, because that was his attitude. "Life happens, get dirty, don't freak." He thought kids without bruises were more suspect because their parents didn't let them LIVE.

sigh

I hate the allergies, I do. Emotionally. But given some of the alternatives handed to friends of mine, I'll take it cheerfully.
post #8 of 216
I could not disagree more with the belief that this is inherited or luck of the draw.

It's all about nutrition and your gut flora. And whether the natural immune system is suppressed with drugs and vaccinations.

Nutrition/Immunology 101
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=406983

Probiotics 101
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...3&postcount=15

My short answer is excellent diet (Nourishing Traditions), lots of homemade yogurt/kefir/fermented veggies for probiotics, healthy traditional fats, high vitamin cod liver oil, and digestive enzymes.
post #9 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
I've also read that for reasons that they haven't entirely figured out yet, babies born my c-section have a higher rate of allergies and asthma.

-Angela
Because they do not get the initial laying down of the mama's gut flora from the vaginal canal like nature intended. Other microbes from the hospital environment end up colonizing.

http://www.massbfc.org/formula/bottle.html
post #10 of 216
Another classic MDC thread:

Prepping for Pregnancy
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=398509
post #11 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS
I could not disagree more with the belief that this is inherited or luck of the draw.

It's all about nutrition and your gut flora. And whether the natural immune system is suppressed with drugs and vaccinations.

My short answer is excellent diet (Nourishing Traditions), lots of homemade yogurt/kefir/fermented veggies for probiotics, healthy traditional fats, high vitamin cod liver oil, and digestive enzymes.
Hm. I just don't know. A good friend of mine does all of this (really! She's basically a nutrition guru at this point) and her little boy still has the worst eczema I've ever seen and reacts horribly to certain foods.
post #12 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS
I could not disagree more with the belief that this is inherited or luck of the draw.
I find this statement to be so--oh, clueless, for lack of a more precise term--that it actually made me laugh, it didn't even make me mad. In my family, we're _all_ pretty darn allergic. Including 3 of my 4 grandparents, who lived through the fear of polio with their _own_ children, and didn't get any immunizations til they were adults (and, perhaps, not until they were elderly and began getting flu shots). My gm with asthma even grew up on a farm, had housecats and dogs, the whole 9 yards, eating incredible homeemade Italian food. Exactly what "experts" now say protect you from asthma (OK, not the ravioli). hahahaha. And I have the exact same type of asthma as she did. My other gm well remembers her own mother's horrible hay fever.

For us, "luck of the draw" means WHAT allergies you will get, not if.

My gggrandfather also died of type 2 diabetes over 100 years ago, and 2 of his ggkids had it, and now it's coming out in my mom's generation. Coincidence? High fructose corn syrup? I think not.
post #13 of 216
Wow, Craftymom, I felt like I just got slapped in the face.

Trust me, that statement is worth about 3 years of agony, frustration and massive amounts of reading research studies and about nutritional healing.

I've cured myself of 4 immune conditions that modern medicine has little answers for: severe hay fever, IBS, interstitial cystitis and chronic hormonal acne.

I'm truly sorry you feel that way. Health is in our control and to really understand that is a priceless gift I have given myself through all this. And one that I have pretty tirelessly tried to pass on at MDC with my 4,000+ posts here, most of which are trying to help others as I have been helped.

I'd suggest you research something called "Epigenetics". Our genes are greatly effected by how we eat and how we live.
post #14 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly
Hm. I just don't know. A good friend of mine does all of this (really! She's basically a nutrition guru at this point) and her little boy still has the worst eczema I've ever seen and reacts horribly to certain foods.
I would do a stool test on him for intestinal flora bacterial causes, more info in the Healing the Gut Tribe sticky. Also DeFelice's book (they are both the same) is the best I've read for food "allergies" and gut problems: www.enzymestuff.com

My DS's skin is doing well but we are still fighting bad bacterial imbalance (proteus mirabilis) in the gut. If he strays from a strict diet as well, (he is no grains at this point, the SCD but even still cannot handle advanced foods) his eczema flares in some hot spots like tops of his feet.
post #15 of 216
It sounds like your line has been pretty unhealthy, craftymom. In that sense, you do have really bad luck. But I don't really understand your point. Just because you have a string of bad health in the family line, how is it that you are sure that nutrients are not a causal or complicating factor?
post #16 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS
I would do a stool test on him for intestinal flora bacterial causes, more info in the Healing the Gut Tribe sticky. Also DeFelice's book (they are both the same) is the best I've read for food "allergies" and gut problems: www.enzymestuff.com
She's done stool test and blood tests.

I'll pass on the book recommendation, though.
post #17 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
I've also read that for reasons that they haven't entirely figured out yet, babies born my c-section have a higher rate of allergies and asthma.

-Angela
They say the reason for that is that a baby's gut is seeded from a vaginal delivery, with the correct probiotic gut flora, assuming the mother's gut flora is right.

I disagree with the opinion, that allergy is genetic roulette.

There is very good clear evidence that development of allergies comes from disturbance of the gut flora, and imbalance in body bacterial flora.

If I can find it, I will put up a whole lot of Pubmed URLs and others to show that allergy development isn't just a genetic luck of the draw, but is very much an environmental situation which we as mothers have a part to play it.
post #18 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by craftymom
I find this statement to be so--oh, clueless, for lack of a more precise term--that it actually made me laugh, it didn't even make me mad. In my family, we're _all_ pretty darn allergic. Including 3 of my 4 grandparents, who lived through the fear of polio with their _own_ children, and didn't get any immunizations til they were adults (and, perhaps, not until they were elderly and began getting flu shots). My gm with asthma even grew up on a farm, had housecats and dogs, the whole 9 yards, eating incredible homeemade Italian food. Exactly what "experts" now say protect you from asthma (OK, not the ravioli). hahahaha. And I have the exact same type of asthma as she did. My other gm well remembers her own mother's horrible hay fever.

For us, "luck of the draw" means WHAT allergies you will get, not if.

My gggrandfather also died of type 2 diabetes over 100 years ago, and 2 of his ggkids had it, and now it's coming out in my mom's generation. Coincidence? High fructose corn syrup? I think not.
Your statement above is uneducated. Which makes it sadder than laughable that you would say such a thing.

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...3&postcount=15

Diabetes Type 2 is not inherited. But lifestyle is. And diabetes type 2 doesn't need cornsyrup, just a dedication to carbs, preferable white refined carbs. And alcohol. And a few other "habits" easily inherrited by observation and doing as your elders did.
post #19 of 216
craftymom,
I hope you are never feel so at the end of your rope that you *have* to start researching and learning about the truth of this topic. I'll bet that 99% of us who are educated in the matter, for one reason or another, had to become so.

After you've read this and studied it for at least half a year continuously, then post again and let us know if you're still laughing.
post #20 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momtezuma Tuatara
There is very good clear evidence that development of allergies comes from disturbance of the gut flora, and imbalance in body bacterial flora.
I was very impressed when dd's pretty mainstream pediatric allergist/immunologist gave me a quick lesson on this.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Allergies
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Women's Health  › Allergies › how not to have an allergic child