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how not to have an allergic child - Page 6

post #101 of 216
I have read on several different threads that people use the term "allergy" inappropriately. But I'm not sure how to better describe my son's sensitivity to milk protein in a way other people can easily understand. He is not ana, and he can have trace amounts like in bread for example without a noticeable reaction. However, let him drink a few ounces of milk, or eat a slice of cheese pizza, or have a small serving of ice cream, and the next 24 hours will be sheer hell. When he first started drinking cows' milk we went through a period of a couple months where we did not know what was wrong--he was moaning and screaming absolutely non-stop and just could not be soothed at all. Our child care provider said she could no longer watch him and suggested we have him evaluated for autism. He was about 16 months old and we were just terrified at the change we had seen in our child in just a few months. Our wonderful family doc confirmed that his behavior was absolutely not normal and helped us figure out the problem was dairy. Once we took him off it he was back to his happy self...we have tried letting him have dairy now and then as a test but every time we get the old behavior back. But you know what...the average person is not interested in hearing our whole story about how we figured out DS can't have dairy. In fact the average person hearing the story thinks we are nuts and just imaginging it, to tell you the truth. So we tell people he's "allergic" even though my best guess is he actually has an inability to digest casein (http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/glutencasein.html) as opposed to a true allergy.

I tell people I am "allergic" to bananas. I have not been tested for this. What happened was over a period of a couple years I noticed I would always get a bad stomach ache if I ate a banana. But I really like bananas, soI would still eat maybe a bite of banana now and then, until even that seemed to cause a bad stomach ache. I pretty much avoided them from that point, but once I was mashing a banana up for DS when he was little and I licked a little off my finger. In a minute or so my tounge and lips began to itch and burn. I was okay but that was a real wake-up call for me that I have become increasingly sensitive and need to watch out because I could be potentially ana to bananas. I still will cut one up for DS now and then but I am very careful to wash my hands afterwards. I was at a get-together recently and came very close to consuming banana without knowing it. I had a cracker with some spread on it halfway to my mouth while the hostess asked whether or not she should put some banana into a punch she was making. I said I'd rather she didn't as I'm allergic and she then informed me very worriedly that the spread I was about to eat had banana as an ingredient. I'm really not sure what would have happened if I had eaten a few bites of the spread. People are always shocked to hear a person could be allergic to bananas but I did some web research on it and it is not all that rare. But I hate for someone to think I am just making an excuse because I don't "like" bananas. I actually like them a lot and this whole allergy thing sucks. I believe it is truly an allergy regardless that I have not had it confirmed through clinical testing.
post #102 of 216
Wednesday, there is a good thread on milk allergy and behaviour I think you would enjoy here: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=460679
post #103 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikirj
Thus those who know their children have, genetically, the potential to react in the worst possible way, may try to avoid the interaction in the first place...and research is on their side.
Thanks, Niki, now I get it.

I'm dealing with a bad case of blame-the-mother -- in this case me -- for my kid's allergies. So when I read threads about how I should have avoided this or that, it really stings. And I can't help but take it personally.

But when I look back, there were no warning signs of food allergies in the family. Nobody has a peanut allergy (that's certain death with Chinese food, which is my background), and DS's mom only ever said that eggs "disagree" with her, so she avoids them. In fact, she's only now told me to watch out for the "-cillins", as his sister was horribly allergic to an antibiotic in her childhood. The denial in that family was pretty absolute, but it's starting to crack and I'm finally getting more information. (My MIL's first comment, on learning about DS's allergies: "Well, he doesn't get that from our side of the family!")

And I still think that developing a massive cat allergy and living with cats while I was pregnant had the effect of super-stressing out my immune system and thus, DS's as well. (I had no problem with cats until a few weeks after they moved in with me.)

There should be a separate thread comparing the stages of grief to the stages of dealing with a child's major allergies (denial and isolation; anger; bargaining; depression; acceptance) -- I think I'm somewhere around bargaining/depression. But here I go, taking this off topic again.
post #104 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by wenat
Thanks, Niki, now I get it.

I'm dealing with a bad case of blame-the-mother -- in this case me -- for my kid's allergies. So when I read threads about how I should have avoided this or that, it really stings. And I can't help but take it personally.

But when I look back, there were no warning signs of food allergies in the family. Nobody has a peanut allergy (that's certain death with Chinese food, which is my background), and DS's mom only ever said that eggs "disagree" with her, so she avoids them. In fact, she's only now told me to watch out for the "-cillins", as his sister was horribly allergic to an antibiotic in her childhood. The denial in that family was pretty absolute, but it's starting to crack and I'm finally getting more information. (My MIL's first comment, on learning about DS's allergies: "Well, he doesn't get that from our side of the family!")

And I still think that developing a massive cat allergy and living with cats while I was pregnant had the effect of super-stressing out my immune system and thus, DS's as well. (I had no problem with cats until a few weeks after they moved in with me.)

There should be a separate thread comparing the stages of grief to the stages of dealing with a child's major allergies (denial and isolation; anger; bargaining; depression; acceptance) -- I think I'm somewhere around bargaining/depression. But here I go, taking this off topic again.
Hugs, dallin. I TOTALLY GET YOU.

And as has often been mentioned here, medical advice changes from pregnancy to pregnancy and child to child from everything on how to let them sleep (back? front? side? alone? co?) to when to not feed them and what to avoid eating and why when you're pregnant. It's insane.

We knew our kids would be allergic (we didn't know the phrase atopic then), but because our allergies were all environmental, we didn't think anything beyond stockign up on benadryl or something. The fact that it could and did manifest as a f&^$& DEADLY food allergy shocked us to the core. Our extended family has in some ways, still not recovered from it.
post #105 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday
I have read on several different threads that people use the term "allergy" inappropriately. But I'm not sure how to better describe my son's sensitivity to milk protein in a way other people can easily understand.
I agree. My daughter and my husband both have several food intolerances, but people don't really understand what that means, so I usually say they are allergic, even though I know they aren't actual allergies. Most people who don't deal with intolerances, even if they do know a great deal about allergies, simply don't understand the first thing about them. I said "intolerance" to my MIL once, and she has latched onto that word, refusing to let it go. This has caused a great deal of confusion in DH's family, because they all now seem to think DD can eat dairy, as long as she takes a pill or drinks the lactose-free milk. Since then, unless I know someone knows what I'm talking about, I say "allergy/allergic to". I have a couple of allergies - the symptoms are nothing like DD's and DH's.
post #106 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by wenat
There should be a separate thread comparing the stages of grief to the stages of dealing with a child's major allergies (denial and isolation; anger; bargaining; depression; acceptance) -- I think I'm somewhere around bargaining/depression. But here I go, taking this off topic again.
I have to agree with you. Dealing with my DD's allergies has been a life changing experience for me. It was a very difficult (but good ultimately.) In my case I accepted her allergies as my own to breast feed, and that really was the best because it forced me to deal with them 1st hand. I kind of felt stange grieving and dealing with it because while it is a "special need" it is minor compared to some. I am very lucky that she is healthy and happy and has no other heath or otherwise issues. It means I am a bit neurotic about what food we eat and reading labels. As a social worker that helped parents with kids who were Deaf, hard of hearing and or other special needs food allergy to milk and eggs (that they should outgrow) is rather minor. Still it is my situation to greave and deal with and I shouldn't discount that.
post #107 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday
I have read on several different threads that people use the term "allergy" inappropriately. But I'm not sure how to better describe my son's sensitivity to milk protein in a way other people can easily understand. ... I believe it is truly an allergy regardless that I have not had it confirmed through clinical testing.
fwiw: our new ped gi dr. just confirmed (w/only my anecdotal evidence!) that dd has a "cow milk protein allergy", and he used that exact term like the "research" uses too. And he said there is no way test for it other than a diet challenge...which we've done...accidentally.
What is most interesting to me now is that he's ordered a RAST test for soy, eggs, wheat, nuts...why soy? why not dairy too? i thought the "soy allergy" was a protein intolerance too. i need to remember to ask him this...
immensely interesting thread --thanks, all!
post #108 of 216
Yah that is strange. Did you see the exact order? When G has had bloodwork done, they generally order a panel and more has been included on the RAST results than I have expected.

Very generally speaking, allergy = reactions to protein
post #109 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazig
fwiw: our new ped gi dr. just confirmed (w/only my anecdotal evidence!) that dd has a "cow milk protein allergy", and he used that exact term like the "research" uses too. And he said there is no way test for it other than a diet challenge...which we've done...accidentally.
What is most interesting to me now is that he's ordered a RAST test for soy, eggs, wheat, nuts...why soy? why not dairy too? i thought the "soy allergy" was a protein intolerance too. i need to remember to ask him this...
immensely interesting thread --thanks, all!
That is stange. DD was tested (blood work) the 1st time (her ped ordered the test, but we went to the hopstial to draw the blood.) He said she was postive for cows milk protein and egg whites (not yokes). They also tested for soy, egg yoak, wheat. He was very excited she didn't have soy, now I understand why. She had a 3 (out of 5 I think) for milk and 2 for eggs.

When they re tested her 6 months later it was strach test, and they did peanuts then too. (neg.) She will be going back for re testing in Sept or Oct.
post #110 of 216
Pshaw... Plummeting... I don't even remember you being mad at me!
post #111 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plummeting
Do I agree that nutrition will prevent all cases of allergies and tooth decay? No, so I guess that's where my views differ from Jane's. However, I do believe that a majority of them would be prevented with proper nutrition and a healthy gut.
I'm not sure I believe this either, did I say all cases? As there are other environmental factors which damage immune system. It's hard to eat 4x the RDA in minerals and 10x the RDA in fat soluble vits from the right mix of foods as traditional societies did with incredible prevention from degenerative diseases. Expensive and time consuming and "insular" ... that type of nutrition is simply not accessable to everyone and I know it. Sure would be nice to "know" though. Wonder how many Amish kids have allergies? Maybe as many that have autism though I'd bet.
post #112 of 216
You never said all cases. I just thought that was what you meant. Maybe some other people did, too, so maybe that's a big part of the confusion around here???? :

You know, Jane, I would bet the Amish have fewer allergies from less exposure to environmental toxins, vaccines, etc., but their diets really aren't all that great, from what I've seen. (Not like I'm an expert on the Amish diet, but you know.) It seems like they eat a lot of sugar and white flour. I definitely think their diets are better than the SAD, but they eat so many desserts and so much white bread, that it's hard to imagine that it's much better, kwim?
post #113 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazig
fwiw: our new ped gi dr. just confirmed (w/only my anecdotal evidence!) that dd has a "cow milk protein allergy", and he used that exact term like the "research" uses too. And he said there is no way test for it other than a diet challenge...which we've done...accidentally.
What is most interesting to me now is that he's ordered a RAST test for soy, eggs, wheat, nuts...why soy? why not dairy too? i thought the "soy allergy" was a protein intolerance too. i need to remember to ask him this...
immensely interesting thread --thanks, all!
That's very strange. Perhaps he's saying that, since so many children are intolerant of dairy protein, rather than truly allergic, there's no point in testing, because a false negative would be meaningless since you already know she reacts to dairy. Who knows what doctors are thinking half the time? (That's how I feel after dealing with a few about my DD's issues when she was a baby.) The problem is that she could also be intolerant of all those other things, so could test negative for all those, but still be unable to eat them.
post #114 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plummeting
You know, Jane, I would bet the Amish have fewer allergies from less exposure to environmental toxins, vaccines, etc., but their diets really aren't all that great, from what I've seen. (Not like I'm an expert on the Amish diet, but you know.) It seems like they eat a lot of sugar and white flour. I definitely think their diets are better than the SAD, but they eat so many desserts and so much white bread, that it's hard to imagine that it's much better, kwim?
I'm wondering how you know this. I always thought the Amish ate very NT style.
post #115 of 216
Oddly, I thought it was kind of common knowledge...Amish food does tend to use white flour and white sugar. We travel to a Mennonite market to purchase much of our bulk food, but we don't buy the prepared/baked foods--it's always heavy on white flour and sugar, soy oil and corn syrup. A lot of their products are baked on site, others are from Amish businesses in PA.
post #116 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plummeting
You know, Jane, I would bet the Amish have fewer allergies from less exposure to environmental toxins, vaccines, etc., but their diets really aren't all that great, from what I've seen. (Not like I'm an expert on the Amish diet, but you know.) It seems like they eat a lot of sugar and white flour. I definitely think their diets are better than the SAD, but they eat so many desserts and so much white bread, that it's hard to imagine that it's much better, kwim?
Hmmmm, I don't know on the whole. The Amish families that several WAPF groups here in MA get their products from are very NT: raw milk, porridges, sourdough, ferments, etc. One of our chapter leaders just visited, I'll have to ask her. I'm sure it must vary.

As far as the products for sale, it could also be the "Chinese Restaurant" deal ... where crappy American Chinese fried food is what you usually get in restaurants, but they eat more fresh things at home?
post #117 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS
As far as the products for sale, it could also be the "Chinese Restaurant" deal ... where crappy American Chinese fried food is what you usually get in restaurants, but they eat more fresh things at home?
OMG that's so funny! I bet it's true, too!
post #118 of 216
In Pennsylvania Dutch Country, which is where many of the products sold in this market come from, the food tends to be very heavy, greatly influenced by German roots, and, while the food isn't heavily processed with preservatives and dyes, white sugar and flour are used pretty frequently. I think families probably use more lard than soy oil at home, and corn syrup is probably used commercially because of cost. The dairy products probably aren't as processed, but they also eat a lot of white potatoes, and sugary desserts.
post #119 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfmeis
Yah that is strange. Did you see the exact order? When G has had bloodwork done, they generally order a panel and more has been included on the RAST results than I have expected.

Very generally speaking, allergy = reactions to protein
Yes, actually, I have the order here. I forgot about his testing for corn too. I'll probably take her in Tuesday -- yikes, I hate the thought of her getting clood taken again -- such a yucky process for her...But I'm really anxious to see if/what she's allergic to. Oh, he's also doing an anemia test (CBC?), I think.
post #120 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy
In Pennsylvania Dutch Country, which is where many of the products sold in this market come from, the food tends to be very heavy, greatly influenced by German roots, and, while the food isn't heavily processed with preservatives and dyes, white sugar and flour are used pretty frequently. I think families probably use more lard than soy oil at home, and corn syrup is probably used commercially because of cost. The dairy products probably aren't as processed, but they also eat a lot of white potatoes, and sugary desserts.
That's how it is in the Iowa Amish communities I've visited.
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