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how not to have an allergic child - Page 9

post #161 of 216
Re the 22# I'm not sure how newsy the news was. I was on the treadmill at the gym trying to listen. I do remember they said John Wayne had 44# at his death. Yeah, seems pretty unfathomable to me.

Interesting re: kids' flora. More info to, yes, digest--thanks!
post #162 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by insider
Epigenetics is very interesting, it's actually a look at environmental factors affecting gene expression, usually during development. Schizophrenia is no longer considered to be an inherited genetic disorder. Causation has been linked to a few environmental factors, one big one is the maternal immune response to influenza infection during pregnancy. Apparently some immune factors aimed at the flu virus affect gene expression, alter fetal development and predispose the child to a future condition of schizophrenia. Before anyone understood the role played by the viral infection, it appeared as if it could only be genetic. Those subtle genetic changes that occur because of the environment are often credited as if they'd been programmed that way from the start.
I know this is a flash from the past but can I ask for more info on this? I am interested in the subject. I thought I posted on it before but can't find it. Do you have any links to studies on it? I know that maternal nutrition was found as factor.
post #163 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by newcastlemama
: Can you link me to the Reuteri 24 hours yogurt instructions :
I just add 4 capsules of Nature's Way Reuteri to a half gallon of milk along with our regular starter. Then culture 24 hrs (the standard time to remove all lactose in milk with any starter.) More detailed instructions in HTG's Cheat Sheet. Goodpapa had his method posted somewhere in "Power of Probiotics", go to that thread and search within it.
post #164 of 216
Oops.
post #165 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.PhD
I know this is a flash from the past but can I ask for more info on this? I am interested in the subject. I thought I posted on it before but can't find it. Do you have any links to studies on it? I know that maternal nutrition was found as factor.
I can't link to the full studies because that'd be copyright infringement. PubMed has the abstracts for free so you could search there. I know that in the past couple of years some good articles have come out detailing precisely how maternal influenza infection affects fetal brain development. If you want citations I can give you them. I have several articles and there are many more I didn't bother to download. So if you want me to throw some citations your way you'll have to tell me specifically what you're interested in seeing. It had been controversial for awhile whether or not maternal influenza infection was linked to schizophrenia so there are tons of articles on that. Since I was working on a particular influenza vaccine, my focus was not on the epidemiologicical controversy (which is now pretty much settled) but on the specific mechanisms occurring in vivo during maternal influenza infection. Those are more along the lines of the research I have.
post #166 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS
I always thought this was a myth purpetuated by colon cleanser type scams. I'd love to know where exactly this is stored?! b/c if you see pics from colonoscopies, the large intestinal wall is clean. Also if one is suspected of having celiac disease, the small intestine is scoped for the characteristic villi, and that is clear as well. :
I agree with you that I seriously doubt there's that much hanging out in there, but the colonoscopies are done on patients who have forced themselves to drink gallons of nastiness to get their colons that squeaky clean.
post #167 of 216
Atopy in children of families with an anthroposophic lifestyle
Alm JS, Swartz J, Lilja G, Scheynius A, Pershagen G.
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Lancet. 1999 May 1;353(9163):1485-8

Quote:
Summary

Background
Increased prevalence of atopic disorders in children may be associated with changes in types of childhood infections, vaccination programmes, and intestinal microflora. People who follow an anthroposophic way of life use antibiotics restrictively, have few vaccinations, and their diet usually contains live lactobacilli, which may affect the intestinal microflora. We aimed to study the prevalence of atopy in children from anthroposophic families and the influence of an anthroposophic lifestyle on atopy prevalence.

Methods
In a cross-sectional study, 295 children aged 5–13 years at two anthroposophic (Steiner) schools near Stockholm, Sweden, were compared with 380 children of the same age at two neighbouring schools in terms of history of atopic and infectious diseases, use of antibiotics and vaccinations, and social and environmental variables. Skin-prick tests were done for 13 common allergens, and we took blood samples from children and their parents for analysis of allergen-specific serum IgE-antibodies.

Findings
At the Steiner schools, 52% of the children had had antibiotics in the past, compared with 90% in the control schools. 18% and 93% of children, respectively, had had combined immunisation against measles, mumps, and rubella, and 61% of the children at the Steiner schools had had measles. Fermented vegetables, containing live lactobacilli, were consumed by 63% of the children at Steiner schools, compared with 4·5% at the control schools. Skin-prick tests and blood tests showed that the children from Steiner schools had lower prevalence of atopy than controls (odds ratio 0·62 [95% CI 0·43–0·91]). There was an inverse relation between the number of characteristic features of an anthroposophic lifestyle and risk of atopy (p for trend=0·01).

Interpretation
Prevalence of atopy is lower in children from anthroposophic families than in children from other families. Lifestyle factors associated with anthroposophy may lessen the risk of atopy in childhood.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10232315
More details on this study on Waldorf site: http://www.waldorflibrary.org/Journa...20allergies%22

Another more recent study with same conclusions:

Allergic disease and sensitization in Steiner school children.
Floistrup H, Swartz J, Bergstrom A, Alm JS, Scheynius A, van Hage M, Waser M, Braun-Fahrlander C, Schram-Bijkerk D, Huber M, Zutavern A, von Mutius E, Ublagger E, Riedler J, Michaels KB, Pershagen G, The Parsifal Study Group.
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Jan;117(1):59-66. Epub 2005 Nov 28.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16387585
post #168 of 216
Great book that describes exactly how the gut flora influences the immune system and development of allergies:

Bacteria for Breakfast
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...075920-8901432
post #169 of 216
A fascinating book on how sugar changes your entire body chemistry, as well as prevent minerals from being utilized.... and how this leads to development of food allergies.

Lick the Sugar Habit by Nancy Appleton PhD
http://www.nancyappleton.com/pages/damages.html

150lbs of sugar/year is the average intake here in U.S.
post #170 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
A fascinating book on how sugar changes your entire body chemistry, as well as prevent minerals from being utilized.... and how this leads to development of food allergies.

Lick the Sugar Habit by Nancy Appleton PhD
http://www.nancyappleton.com/pages/damages.html

150lbs of sugar/year is the average intake here in U.S.
I've read that book and it's pretty interesting...although right after I read it I read another book attributing many of the same things to too much protein: I suppose it's probably not as simple as just one thing causing imbalances.

On a different note, I've been giving DD 100 billion CFU's a day of a customprobiotics mixture for about a month (contains 3 bifidus strains and 5 lactobacillus, including rheuteri. I can't really tell that it's doing anything for her and I'm debating about whether to place another order with them. Do you think it's possible that this is not enough probiotics, or is it more likely there's still some other food, EFA, or other issue going on?
post #171 of 216
What book about protein? I'm not attributing everything to sugar, just that is a big part of our culture and definitely is poisonous to our bodies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
On a different note, I've been giving DD 100 billion CFU's a day of a customprobiotics mixture for about a month (contains 3 bifidus strains and 5 lactobacillus, including rheuteri. I can't really tell that it's doing anything for her and I'm debating about whether to place another order with them. Do you think it's possible that this is not enough probiotics, or is it more likely there's still some other food, EFA, or other issue going on?
Absolutely... have you done allergy testing? I think any evidence of gut damage in babes will likely result in food allergies b/c their immune system has not been developed and the gut will remain leaky. They are still working out self vs. non-self with a leaky gut. Probiotics will help close up a leaky gut, and if given early enough will correctly direct the GALT/BALT/MALT defenses, but won't be the only solution if the immune system has already decided to react to certain foods. And nutrient deficiencies and gut inflammation which influence enzyme production cannot be corrected for this reason. I think that is why it seems like it's so hard to heal a child rather than an adult!
post #172 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post


Absolutely... have you done allergy testing? I think any evidence of gut damage in babes will likely result in food allergies b/c their immune system has not been developed and the gut will remain leaky. They are still working out self vs. non-self with a leaky gut. Probiotics will help close up a leaky gut, and if given early enough will correctly direct the GALT/BALT/MALT defenses, but won't be the only solution if the immune system has already decided to react to certain foods. And nutrient deficiencies and gut inflammation which influence enzyme production cannot be corrected for this reason. I think that is why it seems like it's so hard to heal a child rather than an adult!
Jane we're at this point. Dd has food allergies as a result of her leaky gut. I've had to hunt down supplements that are free of her allergens (corn is incredibly pervasive), but I worry about the reactions we get to so many fruits and vegetables. I don't believe they are "true allergies" yet. So, I'm slowly adding in enzymes (we've already found a safe probiotic, though it doesn't have all the strains I would like), and once I rule out an allergic reaction, I'll add in the others.

So, my question, with your ds, regardless of whether or not an allergen was diagnosed as a true IgE allergy, if you witnessed a reaction to some food, did you eliminate it until you could do more gut-healing before re-introducing it?

Also, when do you give your ds enzymes and how much do you give? We just started using Phytopharmica plant-based enzymes, btw.

Thanks.
post #173 of 216
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
What book about protein? I'm not attributing everything to sugar, just that is a big part of our culture and definitely is poisonous to our bodies.



Absolutely... have you done allergy testing? I think any evidence of gut damage in babes will likely result in food allergies b/c their immune system has not been developed and the gut will remain leaky. They are still working out self vs. non-self with a leaky gut. Probiotics will help close up a leaky gut, and if given early enough will correctly direct the GALT/BALT/MALT defenses, but won't be the only solution if the immune system has already decided to react to certain foods. And nutrient deficiencies and gut inflammation which influence enzyme production cannot be corrected for this reason. I think that is why it seems like it's so hard to heal a child rather than an adult!
I have no idea what the book was called, I just found it interesting that so many of the same things were attributed to two totally different causes:shru

Absolutely...meaning absolutely that might not be enough probiotics? I called a pediatric allergist's office and the nurse said testing was not accurate in such a young kid and an elimination diet was the best way to detect allergies at DD's age. I know she reacts to dairy, wheat, tree nuts, and coconut. She may also react to eggs--I'm having a really hard time figuring out if she does or not, even after eliminating them for 2 weeks and re-introducing with her eating them as well now. If she does it's a very minor reaction but there's enough little things that aren't quite right that I wonder if she is reacting to eggs.

And on another subject...is 1/2 tsp. of EPO a day enough for DD to take directly?
post #174 of 216
CP & Caedmyn: Let's continue in HTG thread...
post #175 of 216
I'm pretty mainstream when it comes to medical stuff, but for my kids, the whole "tendency for atopic conditions to be hereditary" thing comes into play.
post #176 of 216
Regarding vitamin deficiency and development of allergies:

Quote:
Like the active form of vitamin A, the active form of vitamin D—called calcitriol—is a hormone.5

...Hormones can act in two ways: first, they can slip inside of a cell and enter the nucleus, where they bind to DNA and thereby direct a cell to turn the expression of a gene on, off, up or down; second, they can bind to a receptor on the outside of a cell membrane and thereby transmit a signal to the cell, telling it to change what it is doing in any number of ways. Activated vitamin D does both.5,7
http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnut...-d-safety.html
Quote:
Children with asthma have lower vitamin A levels than children without asthma, and the degree of vitamin A deficiency they exhibit is directly proportional to the severity of their asthma.37,38 In cell experiments, vitamin A eliminates the response of bronchial smooth muscle cells to growth factors that characterizes the asthmatic reaction39 and suppresses the activity of mast cells, which are involved in asthmatic or other reactions mediated by histamine or other inflammatory chemical messengers called leukotrienes.40 Consistent with studies in isolated cells, vitamin A deficiency causes asthmatic bronchial hyper-reactivity in live rats.41

Vitamin A also regulates the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Asthma, atopy and allergic rhinitis are characterized by the differentiation of bone marrow cells into eosinophil precursor cells; allergic reactions induce these precursor cells to travel from the bone marrow to the site of the allergic reaction, while inducing those precursor cells already present to finish differentiating into eosinophils; the eosinophils then engage in the inflammatory process and cause the symptoms associated with the reaction. Vitamin A suppresses the production of these inflammatory cells in bone marrow and further suppresses the chemical messages that cause their differentiation at the site of the reaction.42

Although there is little research on the mechanism by which vitamin K may be involved in protecting against allergic responses, one double-blind placebo-controlled study published in 1975 found treatment with vitamin K2 supplementation to relieve asthmatic symptoms in 90 percent of mild cases, 87 percent of moderate cases, and 73 percent of severe cases.43
http://www.westonaprice.org/children...-d-safety.html
Vitamin K2 is aka "The X Factor" at www.westonaprice.org
post #177 of 216
Bumping because this is an invaluable read.
post #178 of 216
A tremendous page summarizing research on infections, vaccines, antibiotics and atopic disease:

Early Life Infections Improve the Function of the Immune System
http://www.chiro.org/Immunity/

From the PBS series NOVA: how our genes are being changed as a result of what we do and eat.

Epigenetics
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/3411/02.html
post #179 of 216
[QUOTE=JaneS;9183043]A tremendous page summarizing research on infections, vaccines, antibiotics and atopic disease:

Early Life Infections Improve the Function of the Immune System
http://www.chiro.org/Immunity/


this was really interesting. but while i can not give my kids vax and antibiotics (my 2yo has never received any of either), i'm not going to put my kids in daycare just to build their immune systems.

are there any other ways to expose them to bacterial infections? my 2yo i'm sure is exposed, he runs around playing with our cat, dog and chickens as well as climbing under things and laying on floors where ever we are. but how do you expose an under 3mo old (which the references show is so important)?? is just being around people enough? i don't freak out when people touch dd hands, unless they just went to the bathroom (and haven't washed their hands yet) or i'm in a hospital.
post #180 of 216
[QUOTE=Vaquitita;9184002]
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneS View Post
A tremendous page summarizing research on infections, vaccines, antibiotics and atopic disease:

Early Life Infections Improve the Function of the Immune System
http://www.chiro.org/Immunity/


this was really interesting. but while i can not give my kids vax and antibiotics (my 2yo has never received any of either), i'm not going to put my kids in daycare just to build their immune systems.

are there any other ways to expose them to bacterial infections? my 2yo i'm sure is exposed, he runs around playing with our cat, dog and chickens as well as climbing under things and laying on floors where ever we are. but how do you expose an under 3mo old (which the references show is so important)?? is just being around people enough? i don't freak out when people touch dd hands, unless they just went to the bathroom (and haven't washed their hands yet) or i'm in a hospital.
The issue I have is with the thinking that you can get bacterial infections. Like these so-called pathogens are lurking around corners waiting to pounce on an unsuspecting person. Bacteria work in symbiosis with the body, they are only called in for duty when the body is going through a cleanse. So it makes sense that a so-called bacterial infection is going to improve allergies because they are caused by toxins, either from the enviroment, pharmaceuticals, heavy metals or cooked foods etc. Wherever there are toxins you will find fungi, bacteria and virus to clean up. If these cleanses are allowed to run their course, ie not stopped with toxic parmaceuticals the body will clear and heal and be better than before. As for exposing a three month old to bacteria on purpose, this is nonsense, you would hope that a baby that young wouldn't be toxic enough to need to cleanse, obviously some are and get sick. FWIW, We are the only species that washes their hands after using the bathroom or before they eat. Most animals even eat their own feces, especially those that have diets deficient in enzymes. And AFAIK animals, apart from domesticated pets and animals -- who incidently are fed, for the most part, inappropriate diets, don't have allergies.
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