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Birth in the 60's - unconscious - Page 2

post #21 of 64
When my grandmothers had my mother and father and their siblings. Uncle (1948), Dad (1949), Mom (1950), Aunt (1962) all of them were in the hospital I think with average birth back then. My grandfathers weren't allowed in the delivery room because that was the norm back then. Not sure how long they stayed in hospital after the birth. They didn't breastfeed them because it was bad to do to breastfeed. Not sure if they had paci. When my mother had my fraternal twin sister and me (1981), she had pretty much non med free birth, really not sure if moved around at all during labor or delivery. My father was in the room even though he doesn't and still doesn't like the hospital. My mom stayed 3 nights after our birth because we born the 2 days before New Years that year so she got the extra night. My mom breastfed us until 7 mo when our ped thought both of us weren't gaining that much weight and of my course my listen to the ped because shes a register nurse and did what was best for us, but in retrorespect I wish she breastfed us until we wanted to wean. However my mom didn't believe in paci at all, but however we had braces as well. Not sure if she had an episiotomy with us. Think my aunts births with my cousins were the average with epidurals, and so on, but her last cousin, it was really fast, plus she had a midwife with that one. 1st (1991), 2nd (1993), 3rd (1998). My uncle was in the room with her for the 1st 2, but the last one he wasn't (he isn't the biogacal father of that child, not going go into the story), my grandma was in the room with her for the last one. She stayed 2 days after that. I know that my aunt tried to breastfeed my 2nd cousin, and didn't breastfeed my 3rd one, not sure about the 1st one. My last 2 cousins had paci since birth until I think 3 yrs old and now they need braces. Not sure if my aunt had episiotomies.

Think thats it.
post #22 of 64
With my birth in 1976, my mom had a whole slew of interventions and I was "born blue" and my mom hemmorhaged (not sure what happened). My dad wasn't allowed in the room and nobody would tell him what was going on even when he saw drs rushing into my mom's room. I'm pretty sure she was awake for the whole thing. With her 2nd baby (my sis) she went to a hospital birthing center. She had her 3rd & 4th at home.

MIL had DH in 1974, in Germany. FIL took her to the hospital, where they were greeted at the door by a nurse who told him to go home and wait for a phone call. I've never heard much more of the story than that, but MIL was very naive about the whole thing and laughs about it now.
post #23 of 64
All I know about my mom giving birth to me is that she was so numb they had to tell her when to push since she couldn't feel it. So at least she was awake for it. This was in WI in 1974.
post #24 of 64
Wow this is all so interesting!!

My Grandma who gave birth to all her children in the early 50's was knocked out for the births. Amazingly, she thinks me doing things naturally is great (tho I'd never tell her I'm planning a homebirth for #2) she always says when I describe things that that is the way the Native American women did it. She and my grandfather had many native american friends and a lot of respect for them.

My mom who had me (the oldest) in 1975 gave birth to all of us naturally in the hsptl tho she did have forceps with her second and I think episiotomies for all 3 of us - not sure on the epis.

My husband was born in 71 but his mom had an older doctor who routinely knocked out the woman. Strange thing is that I heard for years that my MIL was awful at giving birth and with pain and passed out at her first contraction and woke up after the baby was already there. It wasn't until I heard several yrs later her saying that she had fuzzy memories of waking, naming the baby and being kind of out of it b4 passing out again and that maybe she had been given something that I figured out she had been drugged for the birth - NOT passed out from the first contraction. SAD!!!!!!!!!
post #25 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belle
My mom's birth with me was a horror story of interventions in 1976. she was awake and alert but its a pretty horrible story nonetheless.

My MIL said she's learned more from childbirth from her own kids haning children then she ever did when she was pregnant. She was always treated strangely because she breastfed her children though.
This sounds exactly what my mom told me (I was even born in 76 - LOL!). Even when I had my oldest (induced... in a hospital... didn't know any better at the time...), she said she learned more about childbirth during my labor than her own. I was awake the whole time and got to hold her.

Then when I decided to use a midwife with my second, the woman that I thought was a hippie showed not to be so... LOL! "Are you going to have checkups?" "You're going to do that without any pain medication?" She was won over though when she saw little Anna.

It seems like the majority of people really want to medicalize birth... There are just different ways of doing it, depending on the technology of the time. Do you know they actually gave my grandma Sodium Penethol (sp???) with the birth of my mother??? YIKES!
post #26 of 64
IM pretty sure my mother was basically knocked out with both births though now she will probably tell me differently.. I do know with my older sibling my mother almost bled to death supposibly froma tear in her cervix? Sibling was born in 74 and i was 78. I always remember he telling me thats how babies were born back then but i had other friends that were homebirthed..... She also told me how she had to get her milk to stop coming in


I think im the only one in my family tree that i know of that had a natural birth, extended BF and planning a HB.. Kinda sad but also good that i can be added to the tree with that

Michele
post #27 of 64
Anyone else notice birth didn't get unusually scary until they put it in hospitals? When babies died before that it was usually poor hygene or diet or complications that could not be controlled. Then they put it in a hospital, children still died, but it was more often than not because of interventions! So what is hospitalized birth all about? Finding new ways to have dead babies?!

My mom had all her babies in a hospital, NCB for the first 2 (1986, 1988), epidural for the last (1990). She got an episiotomy with me (the first) tore with the second, and didn't tear or need episiotomy with the third. Pretty uneventful births compared to the rest of your parents, but they were later. I never got a chance to ask my grandmother about her birth stories (she had 7 from '57 to '72) but maybe i'll ask my dad's mom (she had 5 from '46 to '62) about hers. She isn't exactly all there (she's not that old, she's just off her rocker) but I'm sure she'd have some interesting stories.
post #28 of 64
My mom had five births (83, 84, 86, 93, 98). The first three she was more or less encouraged to walk as much as possible. epidurals weren't at all common/routine, and she skipped all EFM . She saw an older OB who did perform episiotomies though. With the later births and a different, younger OB, she was pressured to induceinduceinduce. My sister born in 93 was born at 42w3d, and somehow mom avoided a "forced" induction. BY the end of the fifth birth, she had essentially had several 4th degree tears- lots of trauma from 5 episiotomies over the years- requiring reconstructive surgery.

My grandmother had 12 children from the late 40s through the early 70s. She was a nurse beofre getting married/having kids and resisted the typical knocked out birth for all her children. My grandfather wasn't allowed to be present for any of the births- he'd drop her off and go home to wait for a phone call. By the last few children, my grandmother knew when she was getting close to delivering and would wait to head to the hospital... there are a few kids that were born before my grandfather even made it home again (20 minutes away!).
post #29 of 64
These stories are fascinating (and sad)!

I don't know a whole lot but I do know that when my MIL had my sister-in-law (her 2nd child) that my SIL was breech and my MIL refused to let them do a c-section. SIL was born in '82 I think. Anyways MIL says they kept telling her SIL was going to die if they didn't do the c-section. She said every nurse and doctor came in to try and force her to sign the forms...they actually tried to force her hand to write her signature!! She said she was terrified of a c-section though and still refused. SIL was born vaginally with some hip/leg issues that cleared up after about 3 years. Also my SIL was breastfed until she was 2 MIL and FIL also talk about how they went to the "hippie district" with my dh and they bought slings and carried him around like that all the time. My in-laws are way cool.

My grandmother had 2 children, one right after the other. My uncle was 6 weeks late! yep, you heard that right and I believe it was accurate as she ended up having lots of kidney and other health related problems because he got so big (he was 11 lbs and she was a very tiny woman). In photographs you can tell she is pregnant from behind because he was starting to buldge out her back as well! The OB refused to induce her even though she begged. This was in 1949. Finally when she went into labor she went very fast. She said my uncle was crowning before the OB arrived so the nurses kept PUSHING HIM BACK IN! Can you imagine how horrible that must feel?!?!? She said they pushed him back in for about 10 mins before the doc finally arrived. My uncle was born completely blue and not breathing for several minutes. He was severly brain damaged and has never been able to function on his own. He lived with my grandparents until they were too old to take proper care of him. Now in his late 50's he lives in a nice group home and is completely blind (has been since his 20's related to the brain damage). My grandparents tried to sue but I was never really told what came of it so I am assuming they lost. My grandmother always believed that if she had just stayed home my uncle would have been fine...although I do wonder if some of the brain damage was from a very deteriorated placenta.
post #30 of 64
These stories are really making me appreciate my mother. She had two natural births in '63 and '65, but describes them as being quite different. In '63, the doctor marched a whole slew of med students into the room where she was laboring and proceeded to give them a lecture about "The Miracle of Natural Childbirth" during which he said, "This woman has been practicing many complicated exercises for many months in order to be able to do this." when the only exercise Mom had done during the pregnancy was walking and gardening. When she tried to say something, she was "shush"ed.

My own birth in '65 was with a different doc and she describes it in positively glowing terms, other than the sadness she felt because she wanted to have more babies and she knew I would be the last.

My father was not at either birth. Mom didn't want him there and he didn't want to be there anyway. I think he was in some sort of a waiting room on the hospital premises. The marriage was pretty much history by the time I came along, anyway.

My sister and I were both nursed into toddlerhood.

Mom had always expected that I would have home births, so it was no big deal although she was a bit disappointed that I couldn't have a water birth like my sister's best friend had.

I don't know a whole lot about my grandmothers' births but I do know that my father's mother, who was a very small woman, was not allowed to gain more than six pounds during her entire pregnancy. She describes biscuits baking smelling like ambrosia and eating nothing but lettuce. She was also told to essentially Ferberize my father and describes the baby crying his eyes out on one side of a closed door and the Mom crying her eyes out on the other side. She remembered such details in her new mother stories! She wanted so badly to be the perfect mother to her only child (the doctors told her that another baby would kill her) and she had such complete trust in these authority figures that she later realized had betrayed her.

She was also incredibly supportive of AP methods and fascinated by the way her grandchildren were being raised. She lived long enough to know that they were homeschooled.
post #31 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelsi
My uncle was 6 weeks late! yep, you heard that right and I believe it was accurate as she ended up having lots of kidney and other health related problems because he got so big (he was 11 lbs and she was a very tiny woman). In photographs you can tell she is pregnant from behind because he was starting to buldge out her back as well! The OB refused to induce her even though she begged. This was in 1949. Finally when she went into labor she went very fast. She said my uncle was crowning before the OB arrived so the nurses kept PUSHING HIM BACK IN! Can you imagine how horrible that must feel?!?!? She said they pushed him back in for about 10 mins before the doc finally arrived. My uncle was born completely blue and not breathing for several minutes. He was severly brain damaged and has never been able to function on his own. He lived with my grandparents until they were too old to take proper care of him. Now in his late 50's he lives in a nice group home and is completely blind (has been since his 20's related to the brain damage). My grandparents tried to sue but I was never really told what came of it so I am assuming they lost. My grandmother always believed that if she had just stayed home my uncle would have been fine...although I do wonder if some of the brain damage was from a very deteriorated placenta.
Wow... That is sad. I'm very non-interventionalist, but it makes you wonder about the placenta. My son was almost 3 weeks late, and induction was never talked about, but we did have a couple biophysical profiles done... Funny thing is that his placenta was stronger and healthier than my previous child's... (She came the day before her due date...)
post #32 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by noordinaryspider
I don't know a whole lot about my grandmothers' births but I do know that my father's mother, who was a very small woman, was not allowed to gain more than six pounds during her entire pregnancy. She describes biscuits baking smelling like ambrosia and eating nothing but lettuce. She was also told to essentially Ferberize my father and describes the baby crying his eyes out on one side of a closed door and the Mom crying her eyes out on the other side. She remembered such details in her new mother stories! She wanted so badly to be the perfect mother to her only child (the doctors told her that another baby would kill her) and she had such complete trust in these authority figures that she later realized had betrayed her.

She was also incredibly supportive of AP methods and fascinated by the way her grandchildren were being raised. She lived long enough to know that they were homeschooled.
Well, we do the best we can with what we know at the time... Your poor Grandma... Gosh, I remember having a hard time letting my son "cry it out" for about 2.5 minutes. (My husband made me give it a try to see if he would just fuss some... He never got to the bad cry/scream stage, but I'd never even let him cry at all when putting him down... He does sleep much better now, and is a much happier baby...) But anyway, I can't imagine just listening to your baby scream.
post #33 of 64
Wow! This IS a fascinating topic!

I don't know about my grandmother on my dad's side, but I know on my mom's side she had all her babies at home with a midwife. Not a CNM or anything like that, just a local lady who knew how to help babies and moms if they needed it.

My mom didn't care how 'they' did things back then. She had 3 easy, natural births in a hospital and nobody took her conciousness or her baby from her. This was in the early 70's and she's quite a hot head. I can't see ANYONE telling her what to do, white coat or not.

My MIL had her kids in a military hospital. With DH, the hospital was so busy, there were no rooms available. So they strapped her arms & legs down, caught the baby (he came fast) and put her in the hall....STILL strapped down with the baby in one of those plastic cages...I mean cribs.... next to her. She slipped out of her straps and picked him up. She wasn't knocked out or anything, just had what she calls a 'block' down there.

A PP pointed out how scary things got when moms were put in hospitals. I AGREE with that! I had natural birth in a hospital with my first and I was so scared just BEING there that my labor was pretty slow. I felt like a caged wolf whose territory had been invaded and I needed to flee. We're homebirthers now, expecting #3.
post #34 of 64
These stories are so sad. I've asked my grandmother about her births and she talks more about staying in the hospital for a week (!) after each birth and her husband not allowed in the birthing room than about anything else. I'll have to gently pry more information from her.
post #35 of 64
When my aunt was in labor in '64 they gave her medication that made her got out of her head as my mom calls it. She was still in pain but she was so drugged she was grabbing her belly and pulling on it mom said she was black and blue for weeks on her tummy. Not only that but she tore down both thighs and back up into her rectum. My mom had to care for her after it. She was knocked completly out when birth was imminent and baby was delivered via forcepts. Prolly why she tore so horribly. She ended up with such bad scare tissue that she had a hysterectomy a few years later.

My mom with my oldest brother was knocked out and the baby was brought to her a few hours later when she came to he was removed via forcepts and had extensive bruising. he was bfed up to 7mo cause the dr didnt beleive in FF. With me '72she stayed home so long that when she got there I was on my way she told me the nurse checked her so ruffly that it broke her water. She described it as the nurse ramming her hand in there. When her water broke I was on my way out and they had to deliver me without mom being shaved or given a enema. That was standard practice back then. With my younger brother '74 she had a really hard time. From what she describes I think he was sunny side up cause her back felt as tho it was gonna come into and she thought she was gonna die. He came out the biggest at just shy of 10pds. She was knocked out only as he was coming out, twighlight sleep she called it, and he was also a forcepts birth he had dents in his face and skull from them and when he came out he was limp and blue. Mom sayed his whole face was bruised. Because of issues with my oldest brother she never even tried to bfed either of us and was given shots to dry up her milk.


One of my gramma's had 3 of her's at home in the 40's and the last in the hospital 60's. The dr used ether on her at home so she slept thru the births. The last one arrived barly inside the hospital doors. She bfed all but her first, my mom, cause gramma had the flu and mom got pnumonia so she had major issues with her milk coming in. The last was bfed till she weaned around 3-4yo.

The other gramma had 12 children 11 of which survived in the years from '38-'60. She had them at a local clinic. I dont know much details about the births tho. All i could get from my dad is that "most of them" were bfed. Have no idea how many or how long. Need to pick my dad's brain. Just weird cause in my family we dont talk about "woman" issues :
post #36 of 64
Quote:
I AGREE with that! I had natural birth in a hospital with my first and I was so scared just BEING there that my labor was pretty slow. I felt like a caged wolf whose territory had been invaded and I needed to flee. We're homebirthers now, expecting #3.
DS#1 was also a hospital birth and even though I had him completly natural, not hooked up etc I was soo nervous to LEAVE the house. I Knew my contractions were strong, I knew he was pretty low but i remember being so worried that maybe to the hospital I wouldnt be far enough along. Literally as soon as i walked in the the hospital when DH was checking me in I made it very LOUD and CLEAR that NOBODY better mention any drugs and to just go away! Nurses made comments ( which DH told me more about after the birth) . After the birth it was a big deal and the MWs head DR and others were congratulating me because it was such a big deal that I had a natural and quick labor.. It was as though I was some Superwoman.I was literally talk of the floor. Thats SAD! I was just a first time mom with my DH doing what we felt was best and trusting my body.

michele
post #37 of 64
Wow, it is amazing what hospital birth has been like in the past.

My mom had 3 children, and as far as I know, she wasn't drugged for any of them. She was smart and waited as long as possible before going to the hospital, so by time she got there, baby was ready to come. She almost had me in the parking lot! Baby #1 did come out with the help of forceps, but the others were "allowed" to come out on their own. I'm not sure what the deal was with the forceps usage.

My dad was present only for the last birth (mine). The first one, he was on a plane back from Turkey where he'd been stationed in the Army. The 2nd one, they still didn't allow dads in the delivery room. And the third, he got to be in there, and when they laid me in the warmer, he said "That's like a McDonald's french frier machine!" The nurse was not amused.

My mom breastfed all of us, thanks to a wonderful neighbor across the street who had breastfed all of her children and helped my mom to learn it too. She let us all self-wean, but we all self-weaned before 1 year, usually not long after we started eating finger foods and such. My sister was started on solids fairly early, like maybe 2 months? That was the recommendation then. My brother was started on solids around 4 months - the recs had changed. And I wasn't started on solids until 6 months, because again, the recs had changed.

My best friend's mother had her babies in military hospitals in the 70s, and she was told that it was BAD to breastfeed, so she formula fed all her babies. At one hospital, they had the women line up the day after giving birth and get on this table and do a sit-up. My friend's mom was 2nd to last in line, and when she got up there, she said NO WAY! The other moms all glared at her - none of them had stood up for themselves, and they'd all gotten on there and painfully done a sit-up.

I have a baby care sheet from my local military hospital around that time, and it's scary what it says on there about feeding and such... recommending you start solids at 2 weeks, etc. And it says you should feed formula, not breastfeed. Really scary stuff. This sheet came from my MIL, but thankfully, she *did* breastfeed DH (and I think she had a natural birth too). My MIL is always amazed at how much I know about labor and birth though. Back then, they weren't told much, and she finds it so neat that I know where my uterus is at different points in pregnancy and I know what baby is doing inside developmentally, etc. She really wishes she'd had information like that back then. Alas, she was told that her 8.5 lb baby (supposedly 2.5 weeks early - although she told me conception date, and he was only 4 days early) was as big as she could birth vaginally, and that if she had a 2nd, she'd have to have a C-section because she wouldn't be able to birth anything bigger. This woman is short, but she's got a WIDE pelvis. I don't think she'd have ANY trouble birthing a 10+ lb baby, if allowed to get in an appropriate position.

Anyway, I think hospitals have come a long way since the days of "twighlight birth", etc., but they still have a long way to go, with the interventions typically used now (especially unnecessary inductions). There certainly is a place for hospital birth, so I think it's important to continue to work towards changes in hospital birth policies and such, while also educating women about the availability of homebirth and the benefits of it for low risk births. There are some good hospitals out there that I wouldn't mind birthing at, and some that I wouldn't touch with a 10 ft pole! Hopefully we can make some positive changes so our own children can have safe places to birth, whether it be home or in the hospital.
post #38 of 64
My Mom had three c-sections. She failed to progress at all 24 hours after her water broke with my brother so the doctors operated. This was 1977. My younger brother and I were scheduled c-sections in 1979 and 1983. Mom says there was never any discussion about whether or not she'd have c-sections, just "pick a date, ma'am."

My mother in law had three unmedicated births in 1966, 1967, 1973 and my husband's 1975 birth was too painful for her but she doesn't remember what she got for it.
post #39 of 64
My grandmother had 2 c-sections. I'm not sure why she had the first, but I know once she'd had one then the 2nd was planned. My uncle (the 2nd) was premature and they were told to just leave him alone and not touch him, because he was so fragile.

My mom had 3 c-sections. The first was for placenta previa and the baby didn't make it I was born exactly a year later and they were afraid of rupture so didn't let her vbac. My sister was scheduled as well. It was the early 80s so I think vbac wasn't that common anyway.
post #40 of 64
My mom had three epidural-assisted vaginal births (82, 83, 84). My brother was her first and although she claims all three births were quick and easy, he was born with forceps. Maybe it was standard procedure at that hospital for first babies and small women? He's now legally blind in one eye and nearly so in the other from forceps damage. Legal action against the hospital was never considered. I was six weeks early and was rushed away immediately after birth. I stayed in the hospital for several weeks. There's only one picture of me from that time, taken through the glass window on the door of the nursery. My mom is holding me, wearing a surgical gown. We were all three breastfed, my brother and sister to 12 months and me to 15 since I was so small, though I did receive formula supplements during growth spurts "until her milk caught up" according to my dad. My brother was circ'd without thought because that's what a penis was supposed to look like.

MIL had two C-sections. She was told she had CPD and was fully dilated at 4 cm. I'm guessing that she had failure to progress at 4 cm (is that even considered active labor?) with her older son and was told that she had to have a C-section with her second. Both boys were circ'd because she was under the impression that they would be horrified and terribly scarred if their penis was different than their dad's during potty training. She breastfed both. I'm not sure how long the older son was BF, but DH was almost 5.
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