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Traditional Foods Books/Cookbooks

post #1 of 95
Thread Starter 
Can we compile a list of good books/cookbooks related to NT/traditional foods eating? It would be great for people considering such a lifestyle change to have books to check out. Plus, I want to know what the rest of you are eating and cooking from!

Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon

Wild Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz - just got this from the library, and it's fantastic! So many great recipes, from sourdough to kimchi to fermented pickles, and dozens of things I've never even considered before.

Sue Gregg Cookbooks - This is more whole foods cooking than NT, but she's moving toward NT principles as she revises her cookbooks, and she's been heavily influenced by NT. If you already own the books, as I do, there are updates and revisions posted for free on her website, such as this one on Sprouted Breads and this one on the Two Stage Process for soaked flour whole wheat bread.

I'd love to see what other great books you guys read or want related to traditional foods.
post #2 of 95
The only one I currently own is Eat Fat, Lose Fat
post #3 of 95
Full Moon Feast by Jessica Prentice (amazon link)

The Garden of Eating by Rachel Albert-Matesz & Don Matesz (amazon link)
post #4 of 95
Should this one be a sticky too?
post #5 of 95
Yes!
post #6 of 95
Thread Starter 
I'd love for this to be a sticky.

Here's one I found when I was browsing toraji's Wish List :

Keeping Food Fresh: Old World Techniques & Recipes

Has anyone read it? It sounds fantastic.
post #7 of 95
I have it . . . it's pretty good, it has techniques for things like preserving cheese in oil (on the counter), etc.
post #8 of 95
post #9 of 95
I should note that the Raw book is awesome when you adapt the recipes to fit within the concepts the NT advocates such as soaking. Juliano already uses the concept of sprouting but when you add soaking it becomes really amazing. Some of the recipes I have added raw fish and meat to.
post #10 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountain mom
I also love the original Joy of Cooking.
How do I get my hands on one of these?
post #11 of 95
I stuck this thread for you.

Another book that I found had a lot of fermenting/culturing ideas was "The Body Ecology Diet"

Also - macrobiotic cookbooks. That's where I learned about all that stuff years ago when I interned at a macrobiotic cooking school.
post #12 of 95
Do you like the Sue Gregg cookbooks?? I thought they looked interesting and was wondering how her recipes are/taste!!
post #13 of 95
I like her stuff...I don't have any though..just a little sample book...
post #14 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobluegirl
I like her stuff...I don't have any though..just a little sample book...
Okay, thanks!!
post #15 of 95
Oh, and definitely "Honey from a Weed". Superb. Old, old recipes and techniques from the Mediterranean world. With just a bit of adaptation, I think Paula Wolfert's cookbooks are very helpful for creative traditional foods cooking.

Some diet-related:
"The Four-fold Path to Healing"
"The Cholesterol Myth" by Uffe Ravnskov
"The Metabolic Typing Diet" by Wolcott
and of course, "Nutrition and Physical Degeneration" by Weston A.Price
post #16 of 95
Has anyone read "Traditional Foods are your Best Medicine" by Ron Schmid?
post #17 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmamma
With just a bit of adaptation, I think Paula Wolfert's cookbooks are very helpful for creative traditional foods cooking.
Where the heck do they keep the "yeah, that" smiley? I've found Wolfert to be quite useful. Also Elizabeth David and, surprisingly (because it's not really about Traditional Foods) the Zuni Cafe Cookbook. But this is only if you get into tweaking things.
post #18 of 95
The Untold Story of Milk by Ron Schmid. Excellent!!! I think anyone who uses dairy products should read it.

There's a great book about traditionally preserving meats called Charcuterie, by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn. Some of the recipes call for pink salt (sodium nitrite), but many do not use it, or it's optional, or can be substituted with a lactic-acid culture. The subtitle is "the craft of salting, smoking and curing", and chapter 1 is called "The reason for this food, this book: Why we still love and need hand-preserved foods in the age of the refrigerator, the frozen dinner, Domino's Pizza, and the 24-hour grocery store." We got the book because we bought a whole grassfed beef and half a pastured pig, and want to make things like bacon and other salted and/or smoked meats. My hubby made pastrami with the beef brisket (salt and spice dry rubbed, then smoked), and it's amazing!
post #19 of 95
I looked up Charcuterie on Amazon, and one of the books recommended also was The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating- and my library had both books!! So, I'm also recommending The Whole Beast to those who want to try offal. It's all very British style food, but it sounds so good! And I like that he doesn't take himself too seriously. And it's not just offal in there, he's got vegetable recipes, and a yummy sounding chocolate ice cream recipe, and condiments and chutneys in there too. But for NT purposes, the most valuable recipes in there, and the ones with offal.
post #20 of 95
The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery has lots of very simple, basic traditional recipes (although some of them involve flour and sugar). They even tell you how to cook wild meat from your own backyard groundhog, anyone? It also tells you how to cook on an old fashioned woodstove! Cool book.
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