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Traditional Foods Books/Cookbooks - Page 2

post #21 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by julesinottawa
Has anyone read "Traditional Foods are your Best Medicine" by Ron Schmid?
I have..I thought the Untold Story of Milk was much better and more in depth. The next book I want is one by Dr. Tom Cowan (he is on the WAPF board). I get some good info from Mercola's website too.

Jennifer
post #22 of 95
I found this little gem at the library

Encarnacion's Kitchen: Mexican recipies from ninteeth-century California
Encarnacion Pinedo

lots of variety meats recipes (especially lamb,) everything uses lard and it is all really flavorful Californio cooking. I keep checking it back out, hehe
post #23 of 95
Here are two excellent books about using those mysterious, "unfashionable" parts of the animal (tails, shanks, ribs, etc.).

Bones: Recipes, History and Lore, by Jennifer McCagan
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking, by Molly Stevens

In addition, Time-Life's excellent cookbook series, "The Good Cook," has a volume on "Variety Meats," which is out of print, but available used online.

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I've also come across this fascinating collection of recipes for old-time "invalid dishes," such as gruel, caudle, beef tea, barley water, oxtail jelly, and herbal tonics. (It's also out of print, but available used.)

A Soothing Broth by Pat Willard

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Here's a book of old-world recipes and instructions for making sausages. The author learned to cook as a child, watching his Russian grandmother prepare traditional dishes. He went on to study ethnic sausage-making techniques from around the world, to help preserve this dying art. Unlike the much more expensive and lavishly illustrated Charcuterie, none of these recipes call for nitrates.

The Sausage-Making Cookbook by Jerry Predika

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Finally, a book of particular interest to those of Irish background:

Irish Food and Cooking by Georgina Campbell and Biddy White Lennon

This only came out last year, but it seems to be out of print already. (I found it on a St. Patrick's Day display at Borders.) Predictably, most of the baked goods call for refined grains and sugar, but there's also an excellent selection of recipes for soups, stews, roast game, etc. More importantly, this book has a great deal of information about traditional Irish diets (going back many centuries), which I haven't been able to find elsewhere.

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For those researching traditional diets of other countries, especially in Europe: If you search the web for "SCA recipes [name of country]", you'll find many sites put together by members of the Society for Creative Anachronism, who enjoy researching medieval foods and cooking techniques. (For instance, Godecookery.com is a very extensive one.) These sites often have reviews of "historical cookbooks."

Here's someone's Amazon Listmania! list, which has many recommendations: Essential SCA Cooking and Food History Books

(I'm a little scared to order these books, because I bet they're going to tell me that my ancestors loved to eat "eel pie" or "potted eels" or something. I'm not generally squeamish; in fact, we had fried lamb's brains last week. But, for some reason, eels really freak me out. Unless they're grilled, in sushi. For some reason, that doesn't count. )
post #24 of 95
Michigan State has a digital library with a historical cookbook collection: I've only had a little time to browse them but I find them SO interesting. Click on one of the book icons at the right to get started:

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/...oks/index.html

I want to second Mary Celeste's rec. of All About Braising. I got it at the end of last winter and can't wait to try more recipes. I just need a better source for some of these "cheaper" cuts, LOL. Also, cut the temp by 25-50 degrees F. She tends to braise on a higher heat than most so the liquid is boiling instead of simmering.

Finally, I got Irish Food & Cooking that she lists a few months ago at Borders (I believe) on their bargain cookbook table for $5.99. Look there first. (I'm so excited to hear of the history section since I've wanted to know more about what my Irish half ate.)

-Kelly
post #25 of 95
This isn't a cookbook, but a great intro to NT principles which I highly recommend to NT newbies, especially friends who might be overwhelmed by all the info in Nourishing Traditions. It's called Real Food: What to Eat and Why, by Nina Planck and it just came out this year.

If you've read NT and the Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan, most of it is review, but it's great for someone just getting started.
post #26 of 95
Hey, have any of you guys heard of this one?
Native Nutrition: Eating According to Ancestral Wisdom
by Ronald F. Schmid


Sounds very interesting

Tanya
post #27 of 95
as far as I know it goes hand in hand with NT.
post #28 of 95
Hey, I found an unexpected gem ( in my own cook book collection The frugal gourmet on our immigrant ancestors. He apologizes for using lard (but he uses it and there are some very non-NT things, but also thing like lacto fermented moroccan lemon etc. Very easy to find for very cheap at many second hand book stores ( I have seen it a three so far)
http://www.amazon.com/Frugal-Gourmet...e=UTF8&s=books

Another nice one I found is cook like a peasant, eat like a king...http://www.amazon.com/Cook-Like-Peas...e=UTF8&s=books

Tanya
post #29 of 95
Reading and loving Full Moon Feast! Thanks for all these other great links to continue on!
post #30 of 95
Anyone have the new 75th anniversary edition of the Joy of Cooking?
Quote:
In addition to hundreds of brand-new recipes, this Joy is filled with many recipes from all previous editions, retested and reinvented for today's tastes.
Wonder what that means exactly....

If I were to buy this book, which edition would you recommend?
post #31 of 95
Here's what I found from Wikipedia:

Quote:
In 2006, a 75th Anniversary edition was published, containing 4,500 recipes and returning Rombauer's original voice to the book. The new version removes some of the professionalism of the 1997 edition and returns many simpler recipes and recipes assisted by ready-made products such as cream of mushroom soup and store-bought wontons. The 2006 edition also reinstates the cocktail section and the frozen desserts section.
Based upon my reading of the Wikipedia article it would look like it might be a good bet to look for the 1962-1964 editions.

Of course, if you could get a hand on the original edition that would be even better, but it's probably prohibitively expensive! I'd try looking in used bookstores and antique stores to see if they have any.

ETA: Oooooo....there's a facsimile of the 1931 edition available!
post #32 of 95
What about "The 1896 Boston Cooking-School Cook Book"? Has anyone tried this one?
post #33 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by pamered_mom View Post
Here's what I found from Wikipedia:



Based upon my reading of the Wikipedia article it would look like it might be a good bet to look for the 1962-1964 editions.

Of course, if you could get a hand on the original edition that would be even better, but it's probably prohibitively expensive! I'd try looking in used bookstores and antique stores to see if they have any.

ETA: Oooooo....there's a facsimile of the 1931 edition available!
Hmmmmm, it's so hard to decipher the reviews - the reviews at the bottom of the page of the 1931 facsimile are pretty poor, but maybe they're written by calorie counting saturated fat-a-phobics?

The 1975 edition sounds tempting....I'm going to have to actually flip through these books, guess I'll be hanging out in Borders & some old book stores....with 3 kids....
post #34 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metasequoia View Post
Hmmmmm, it's so hard to decipher the reviews - the reviews at the bottom of the page of the 1931 facsimile are pretty poor, but maybe they're written by calorie counting saturated fat-a-phobics?
That was my take when I read it. I don't think the review were really by folks who were all that interested in all that cooking from scratch as well as folks who found that it didn't fit with their reduced calorie/low fat lifestyle.
post #35 of 95
I was flipping through the 2006 75th anniversary edition at Costco on Monday, it was only $16.99 - gotta love Costco. Anywho, all of the recipes used butter, that's a plus, but I did skim the section son fats & oils & it had the usual lecture about saturated fats being evil (but it also talked about trans fats being evil, which is a good thing.)

What does the 1975 edition have to say about that stuff? Do the recipes call for butter? I don't know what cookbooks were like back then.
post #36 of 95
The recipes in the first edition call for butter. I have a first edition printed in 1980 that I got second hand.
post #37 of 95
I got my sister & her bf a crock pot for xmas & to go with it, The Healthy Slow Cooker: More than 100 Dishes for Health and Wellness by Judith Finlayson

Now I have to go buy it for myself, the recipes were fantastic!
post #38 of 95
Erin, the local library system has copies of the 1975 and 1962 editions. You could borrow them and preview them - then report back
post #39 of 95
Seasons of my Heart: A Culinary Journey through Oaxaca, Mexico by Susana Trilling is another wonderful book on traditional food from Oaxaca.
post #40 of 95
RECOMMENDED READING


COOKBOOKS
1. Nourishing Traditions – Sally Fallon
2. Coconut Lover's Cookbook - Bruce Fife
3. Extending the Table: A World Community Cookbook - Joetta
Handrich Schlabach
4. The Victory Garden Cookbook - Marian Morash


OFF THE GRID FOOD PRESERVATION
1. Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-
Culture Foods - Sandor Ellix Katz
2. Keeping Food Fresh: Old World Techniques & Recipes Paperback -
Claude Aubert
3. Making Sauerkraut and Pickled Vegetables at Home: Creative
Recipes for Lactic Fermented Food to Improve Your Health - Klaus
Kaufmann
4. Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables -
Mike Bubel


GARDENING & GREENHOUSES
1. Square Foot Gardening – Mel Bartholomew
2. Four Season Harvest – Elliott Coleman
3. Greenhouse Gardener's Companion: Growing Food and Flowers -
Shane Smith
4. The Backyard Orchardist - Stella Ott
5. The New Seed Starters Handbook - Nancy Bubel
6. Seed to Seed: Seed Saving and Growing Techniques for
Vegetable Gardeners – Suzanne Ashworth


SUSTAINABLE LIVING r/t FOOD
1. The One Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka


GOVERNMENT & POLITICS r/t FOOD
1. The Dialectic & Praxis: - Dean Gotcher
2. Seeds of Deception - Jeffrey M. Smith


GENERAL HEALTH & NUTRITION
1. Nutrition & Physical Degeneration – Weston A Price
2. Enzyme Nutrition -Edward Howell
3. Know Your Fats - Mary G. Enig
4. Traditional Foods Are Your Best Medicine - Ronald F. Schmid
5. The Whole Soy Story - Kaayla T. Daniel
6. Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills - Russell L. Blaylock
7. Sugar Blues - William Dufty
8. What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Menopause - Lee
9. The Food Pharmacy Guide to Good Eating - Carper
10. Your Body is Your Best Doctor - Abrams
11. Food is Your Best Medicine - Bieler


SPECIFIC FOODS THAT HEAL
1. Allicin: The Heart of Garlic - Josling
2. Deadly Feasts: Tracking the Secrets of a Terrifying New Plague - Rhodes


HOMESTEADING
1. Family Friendly Farming - Joel Salatin
2. All Flesh is Grass - Gene Logsdon
3. Pasture Perfect - Jo Robinson
4. The Encyclopedia of Country Living - Carla Emery
5. Back to Basics - Reader's Digest Editors
6. One Acre and Security - Bradford Angier
7. Five Acres & Independence - Maurice G. Kains


RAW MILK
1. The Untold Story of Milk – Schmid
2. The Milk Book - William Campbell Douglass II, MD


WEIGHT CONTROL
1. Eat Fat Lose Fat – Mary Enig
2. The Coconut Diet - Cherie Calbom
3. The Makers Diet – Jordan Ruben
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