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What do you consider "special needs"? - Page 4

post #61 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfmama
christaN, from what i've seen OT for SID is hard to get for any child. you have to prove academic relevance. my son will get OT for dysgraphia but not for SID.

i have to do private OT for sensory issues.
Yep. My ds got OT because they could code his dx as a "sensory based feeding disorder." SID isn't covered. Now that he has the autism dx on top of it all, we can get OT for whatever we need, thank goodness.
post #62 of 92
I think Christa's experience with her daughter is all too common these days. I remember my own GT classes; they were much like what you are describing Finch.

But I see so many highly intelligent kids with very out of whack development. Sure my 6 year old can understand Astrophysics, but he cries for literally hours after I cut his fingernails....if I can cut them without him hitting, kicking, or biting me. And forget washing his hair or brushing his teeth.

Asynchronous development is one of the hallmarks of high intelligence.

Like I said, I know a guy who is bloody brilliant, but he can barely run his class because he can't remember that he has a dentist appointment scheduled at the same time as class. He can't drive himself to University (he's 55). And he can't remember which room the class is in. What would he do if his wife died, G-d forbid?


mv
post #63 of 92
My dh reminded me of a girl he taught. Possibly one of the smartest he taught. She was gifted- not high needs- but IMO special needs (due to giftedness- no other "issues") quiet kid. Shot herself in the chest at 16. Sadly pretty typical among gifted kids.
Because they:
"don't need anything special"
"everyone would love to have kids like them."

Maybe her parents felt that way... right up to the day before. I want to make sure that's not my child.

-Angela
post #64 of 92
Baruch Dayan Emes.

"I want to make sure that's not my child."

Me too.
post #65 of 92
We don't consider our eldest daughter to be "special needs" or "Special Needs".

Her issues:

- Born with a cleft lip and gumline (cosmetic issue, repaired through surgeries, left with scars and a 'fat lip' but her PS is wonderful and to the untrained eye she looks like she had a recent fall).

- Born with congenital neurologic strabismus (no fix yet with our medical science, surgeries and glasses used to try to patch her brains' misdirection).

- Diagnosed with SID (mild case, we're not pursuing OT, but we take it into consideration still. It mostly impacts her in regards to food and sounds).

- Lots of allergies, known and unknown (resulting in chronic congestion, excema, apnea, nasal voice, cough etc. since birth).

- Diagnosed with delayed speach (we thought mild, and it was, she started speaking at 2.5 and hasn't stopped since. We had opted out of ST.)

- Currently been battling recurring bouts of severe headaches and nausea/vomiting lasting for 18-24 hours. This started in March and happens 1-2 times per week. (She's spent her Spring and Summer going to specialists and being tested, examined, x-rayed etc.. Still awaiting an official diagnosis, or eliminating all possible alternatives before sticking with the migraine theory presented by her neurologist.)

- She's highly intelligent and has difficulty relating to same age peers on an intellectual level (simply, they confuse her).

As I said, neither my husband nor I would call her special needs for any or all of her issues. But isn't that just symantecs? I don't think it matters what I consider to be special needs or what anyone else does. If anyone were to tell me that there child is special needs I would never presume to tell them their child wasn't, for whatever reason. It's all about perspective, and one of the wonderful things about being human, and having the ability and the freedom to communicate and express our feelings is our differences. No one knows what it is like to be me, or anyone else. We have all lived very different lives that have lead to where we are now; with our thought process and choices.

That said, just because someone has it worse then me or our DD it doesn't take away from what we go through with her, what she has gone through and what trials she has yet to face. Just because someone hasn't experienced all that we have doesn't diminish what they go through with their children. Do we really need to define special needs on a board such as this, while in our day to day lives we struggle for the rights of our children (children with and without issues alike)? I worry when it comes to issues like this; feeling the need to classify phrases to fit our own standards or that of a majority that it will end up diminishing someones personal plight. By some people's personal standards our DD is sn, or even SN, by other's she isn't sn at all. I am personally not concerned with the perceptions of others, but am concerned that placing those standards out there could be exclusive.
post #66 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaverdi
b

But I see so many highly intelligent kids with very out of whack development. Sure my 6 year old can understand Astrophysics, but he cries for literally hours after I cut his fingernails....if I can cut them without him hitting, kicking, or biting me. And forget washing his hair or brushing his teeth.
That's SID, not giftedness.
post #67 of 92
Finch, I admit that my experience is limited to my child, but the psychologist whom we consulted regarding dd is nationally known for her work with gifted children. She stated that most gifted children show signs of SID due to the innate sensitivity of their brain wiring. In other words, some degree of SID is part and parcel of being gifted. I don't really see it as a separate issue in my dd, but rather as part of the whole package of her primary issue.

Similarly, she's got training wheels on her bicycle and is very cautious physically not b/c she has some other issue but b/c she is hyperaware of the potential consequences of injury and is afraid of doing things b/c she could get seriously hurt or die. I don't try to tease all of these things apart b/c they really aren't separate issues.
post #68 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristaN
Similarly, she's got training wheels on her bicycle and is very cautious physically not b/c she has some other issue but b/c she is hyperaware of the potential consequences of injury and is afraid of doing things b/c she could get seriously hurt or die. I don't try to tease all of these things apart b/c they really aren't separate issues.
That was SO me. It DID impact my life. There were tons of things that "normal" kids did that I never would have considered.

MV's son's SID is BECAUSE of his giftedness. They're intertwined. They're one and the same.

-Angela
post #69 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
MV's son's SID is BECAUSE of his giftedness. They're intertwined. They're one and the same.

-Angela
Huh. Never read that in any book about SID, nor have any of my son's therapists who specialize in SID said that SID and giftedness are "one in the same." SID is SID. Gifted is gifted.
post #70 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finch
Huh. Never read that in any book about SID, nor have any of my son's therapists who specialize in SID said that SID and giftedness are "one in the same." SID is SID. Gifted is gifted.
Perhaps you should read more books on the special needs of gifted children. This is documented.

-Angela
post #71 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
Perhaps you should read more books on the special needs of gifted children. This is documented.

-Angela
Not worth it. Dig your heels in. Have fun.
post #72 of 92
Giftedness does not negate or override other diagnoses.

So your children are gifted AND likely have SID (I say likely because only a SID trained OT can either diagnose or truly rule that out. I have not yet heard of a clinically trained and licensed SID psychologist, but I could be wrong. Please hear that with the sincerity I'm saying it. I hate message boards with their lack of tone.) And you know what? There's absolutely nothing wrong with having SID AND being Gifted. Giftedness and SID are both a part of who they are and how they navigate this world. The SID does not need to be 'hidden' (for lack of a better term right now) under the Gifted label. Gifted + Special Needs is highly documented, as well. (Deidre Lovecky's work for example)
post #73 of 92
SID can exist in other situations, but in gifted kids it's often because they're gifted. Just like developmental delays can exist in lots of kids, but in kids with downs syndrome, it's because of the downs.

I'm sorry this is so difficult for you to understand.

-Angela
post #74 of 92
I guess we're not gifted.
post #75 of 92
So does this mean my child isn't gifted b/c he doesn't have SID?

Sorry, couldn't resist Going back to lurking...
post #76 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by monday's child
So does this mean my child isn't gifted b/c he doesn't have SID?
Of course not. Just like all kids with downs syndrome don't have all the issues (some don't have heart issues... for example) But it IS documented to sometimes/often go along with it.

-Angela
post #77 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna
Of course not. Just like all kids with downs syndrome don't have all the issues (some don't have heart issues... for example) But it IS documented to sometimes/often go along with it.

-Angela
Obviously you didn't get the subtlety of my humor there, though I did include a to show that I was joking.
post #78 of 92
So they "often" go together. "Often" going together does not make them "one in the same."

Whatever. You're the expert. You know it all, and we're just screaming mimis. Have at it. I quit.
post #79 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by monday's child
Obviously you didn't get the subtlety of my humor there, though I did include a to show that I was joking.
sorry.... it's just been a bit harsh around here... :
post #80 of 92
indeed.
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