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post #41 of 111
I live on the west coast of Canada.

*Breastfeeding: Most try it and nurse for a few months. We have a year of leave, so alot of mothers nurse for 6 month ish...the hospital prettty much assumes you'll be nursing.

*Co-sleeping: Not sure on this, there is a crunchy culture here, as well as not so classy...it's a wide range. So maybe 50 50.

*Vaxing: 85 percent probably, but they didn't give me a hard time about not vaxing, so it's been done here.

*Babywearing. Quite a few...maybe only 5-10% of the population, but I see them often enough.

*Daycare: I have no idea...there are a few sahm in this area though, but also quite a few unemployed and happy. :mad

*Pre-school: No clue.

*CIO: I'm sure it's done. Not sure how much though, there are some pretty aware parents around.

*Circ: 50 50 I think. You have to make an appointment to have it done, it' not offered at the hospital.

*Discipline: Some spank, lots yell, lots of time outs and shaming. Ugh. Bring on the gd'ers

*TV: quite a bit around here, and video games, and loud icky music.

*Character Clothing. You see it, but it isn't all over the place.

*Toys: A little bit of both. But alot of girl/boy toys.

*Food: Lot of people eat well, but just the other day I saw a one year old ish, maybe 15 months with a baby bottle of iced tea. Not the first time I've seen that either.

There's alot of sposie use, pretty much everyone, but anyone who has seen my cloth diapers has really liked them. I know a mom here who ec's. There is a really cool baby store that sells good stuff...they only have Kusies, but at least it's cloth.
post #42 of 111
We live in Australia. This suburb is working class.

*Breastfeeding: 50/50 I think. It is considered best, then weird once babe is 6mths.

*Co-sleeping: This is seen as a no no! We felt guilty for the first year and didn't mention it. Though I get the impression more would co sleep if it was more acceptable.

*Vaxing: It is the done thing. Not many question it. Ppl think I am silly cos I have chosen not to vax my youngest.

*Babywearing: I see a lot use baby slings. we don't use a sling but hubby and I both carry our youngest around as do many others.

*Daycare: Very common. Ppl are known to use it for a day a week if not working also.

*Pre-school: Its expensive but worth it. Probably 70% send kids to local kinder at age 4.

*CIO: I am assuming this refers to control crying? It is widely accepted and even encouraged.

*Circ: This is frowned upon as unnecessary in Australia - I know it to very rare here

*Discipline: Aggressive and disrespectful ways imo.

*TV: Ppl seem to live for it - I don't get it as nothing is ever on!

*Character Clothing: That is all you see!

*Toys: Stereotyped generally.

*Food: Junk and cola - kids eat sugar all day long in this area.

*Nappies: disposables are the norm. I just discovered a whole new world just recently myself. Ppl just don't know.
post #43 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nora'sMama
Someday Mom, my extended family are in the Bible Belt, and I actually know that mainstream far better than the mainstream here where I live. So I will answer the questions for where my relatives live in Louisiana, which will explain why I feel quite uncomfortable when I am there:

Breastfeeding - some try, many don't, very rare to BF to a year. My aunt BF my cousin to 16 months and that is considered HIGHLY unusual and a little strange.

Co-sleeping - definitely frowned-upon. My whole family were convinced I would roll over on DD. They were seriously worried and brought it up kind of a lot. I couldn't convince them it was safe. :

Vaxing - 100% and they would think I was absolutely nuts to question it. Questioning anything (government, religion) is generally frowned-upon in NE Lousiana (unless the Democrats are in power or the religion you're talking about is something other than Christianity...in those cases, question away! )

Babywearing - unheard-of, never even saw a Bjorn there. They thought my sling was very exotic and kind of funny. My aunt was really concerned about my baby's safety while in the sling and kept trying to get me to take her out.

Daycare - Plenty of SAHMs or moms who work part-time. It's a poor area so people take jobs when they can get them, and most people live near extended family, so that takes care of childcare. There are daycare centers, but it's not a 'nanny' type of area.

Pre-school - the well-off kids go, but not universally. There aren't a lot of good pre-schools available.

CIO - I'd bet almost everyone uses CIO. It's rough being a kid in the poorer, rural areas of the Bible Belt. Most parenting is not very gentle, starting in babyhood.

Circ - probably 100% or close to it.

Discipline - HARSH. Hitting children is the norm, even whipping them with switches or belts. You can talk about such things in mixed company and you will not get shocked looks except from the strange person visiting from California. Luckily in my family the current generation of parents have mostly gone for a much gentler style than their parents. I do have one cousin who started hitting his kids when they were only babies. But the others use time-outs much more than hitting (although I think everyone spanks at least occasionally). Children are brought up to be "seen and not heard", to say "yes ma'am/sir", to obey. Obedience is considered a very key virtue in a child. When kids are acting up they are told that they are acting "ugly". "Sass" is not tolerated. Kids do, indeed, seem to have much better manners in Louisiana than they do where I live...but they learn them in a pretty harsh way.

TV - never been to a house in the area where my extended family lives where the TV wasn't on. Kids watch enormous amounts of TV and videos as a general rule.

Character clothing - rampant. It's a depressed area with few stores so most poorer people's clothes come from the thrift store or Wal-Mart. More prosperous people shop at the mall...there is a slice of society who dress their children in very nostalgic, retro clothes, like kids were dressed in the 30's - big hair bows for girls, saddle shoes for boys, etc. Think how Justice Roberts' kids were dressed when he was sworn in. These people would definitely not allow character clothes. But that's only the wealthy people. Other wealthy people dress their kids very preppy, and would also not do the character thing. It's definitely a sign of being "low class".

Toys - electronic four-wheelers, etc., are very popular. Toys tend to be plastic and very gender-segregated. Not a lot of Legos and "learning" toys. But it's a class thing - the wealthier kids have LeapFrogs.

Food - it's common to give kids nothing but junk from a VERY young age. Typical Southern food is unhealthy enough but many people put soda in the bottle, etc., and give their toddlers true junk food all day long. It's very hard to watch my cousin constantly giving her obese preschool boys soda, candy, cookies, and "fruit snacks". Constantly. They are hardly ever NOT eating. This is common but not universal. Food is a big part of the culture. Vegetarianism is considered extremely strange and suspect.

See why I don't live there? Much as I love my close-knit extended family, and miss them terribly, I would be a pariah and I don't want DD growing up in that kind of culture. But the good thing about it is that people do lots of things with their families; it's a much less atomized and individualistic culture and also more homogeneous, for better or for worse.

Also, a lot of these norms are changing, and a couple of my cousins, while not crunchy, have radically improved their parenting from the past generation. One of my cousins also homeschools and does a fantastic job.

I'm missing the family reunion down there right now and I'm sad...
I live in Southeast Louisiana, and it's pretty much the same.
post #44 of 111
I live in a small university town. The biggest employer (dh works for them) brings in people from major US cities and all over the world, so we have a diverse,progressive community within the town itself-which is a little more conservative and rural.

Breastfeeding: All moms I know do it or have done it. NIP is the norm.

*Co-sleeping: We do it, and I know of people who have done it with an infant. I do not, however, think it's common with older children, as we do.

*Vaxing: Most people I know vax on a delayed schedule, selectively.

*Babywearing-lots of slinged babies, ergo carriers seem to be most popular.

*Daycare: Most mothers stay at home. Especially with the wives from my dh's company-we relocate here and there's really no work for the spouses. I would say the majority of local mothers also SAH. I don't know what type of daycares are available.

*Pre-school: most people send their children to preschool after age 3. We didn't with our first daughter, but my second goes for a couple of hours a week.

*CIO: The moms I know do not, have no idea about others.

*Circ: as far as I know circing is the standard.

*Discipline: I would say parents from our "group" tend to be more GD inclined. Have seen many parents with poor communication skills on playgrounds and at the pool-yelling, belittling, shaming, etc.

*TV: Most people I know don't let their children watch it excessively.

*Character Clothing. Yeah, I would say it's also looked at as being "low class.
"

*Toys: we have an independently owned toy store that's wonderful-with unique, enriching toys. They do story hours and craft times-very popular. In our circle, people prefer to support this store than to go to Target or Walmart.

*Food: we have Trader Joe's, Clark's, a farmer's market, plus we get eggs from the ranch, citrus at the grove, and have our own avocado tree. The only thing we're lacking is good health food restaurants.
post #45 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by maya44
Some of the threads here got me to thinking about what people veiw as "mainstream" depends so much on where they live.

Where I live, an upper middle class suburb of a big city with a nearby University where many people work the mainstream on the following issues is:

*Breastfeeding: Almost everyone tries it. I'd say 75 precent do it for a full year. Few people do it after a year.

*Co-sleeping: Almost no one does it by making a decision to do it. I'd say a good 1/4 end up doing it but don't really talk about it.

*Vaxing: 100 percent done. Have never heard of anyone who resists though there is MUCH knowledge about issue out there (many scientists in these midsts.) Also many doctors here.

*Babywearing. Done by maybe 20 percent. Babies are seldom heard crying in a stroller though. Moms here do pick up their kids and hold them, for the most part.

*Daycare: Very little outside of the home (nanny). Most women are SAH moms who do have "babysitters' help out 1 to 5 days per week. Babysitter used mostly to stay with kids while napping or stay with younger ones' while mom is out with older kids.

*Pre-school: Only one child in any of my dd's kindergarten classes came in without first going to preschoo. BUT this means TRUE "preschool" not some form of day care. No more than 2 hours 2 to 5 days per week. Most are "developmental" Almost no one interested in their children learning anything specific at this age (big feeling that there will be pleanty of time for that later since most expect kids here will go on to not just college but some form of post graduate degree

*CIO: Proabably done by about 60-70 percent of moms. Two of the biggest ped's in town trained under one of the big "sleep doctors".

*Circ: This is a heavily Jewish area. Every single person I know who has done it, has done it for religious reasons. (ETA...I know one person, who is not Jewish but works for a big health public policy iniative and did it becasue she truly believs it is best. She got a Jewish Mohel (Person trained in ritual Jewish circumcission) to do it because she felt they were the best at it (its all they do...a full time job) and because she feels that are very proactive about pain relief.

*Discipline: Spanking just "not done." It is considered "low class". So is yelling at your child in public. Majority uses some form of "time out" but a substantial number also just GD (Not TCS or CL though)

*TV: Education is EXTREMELY important to the parents here. Most people restrict both the amount and content of television watching. No one I know of is TV free though.

*Character Clothing. Again considered "low class" A shirt from Disney World might be worn as very casual clothes. But you dont' see much of this.

*Toys: Again character stuff just not considered very high class. Two very nice local toy stores do most of the business in town. Sell NO character stuff, though not NFL stuff by any means.
*Food: Natural Food stores do brisk business. Most parents resist buying the junkiest of the junk (trans-fats etc...). Mothers pride themselves on cooking healthy meals.
This sounds almost exactly like where we live, though I might just be describing my friends. Thank goodness; I don't know what I'd do anywhere else in the country.... Except we do have a higher and higher proportion of people not circ'ing.

Completely agree with the characterizations of the character clothing and toys, though I do know people who have some. Esp. Star Wars, which has crept into our house through ds's friends...
post #46 of 111
I'm the oddball where I live (I'm not native of this area).

Most:

*spank as the first course of discipline
*formula feed and teach children that breasts are sexual and therefore PRIVATE (I've met two moms who have breastfed and all others have formula fed- one woman refused to share her boobs with her child thought they were for her husband only)
*don't know what a sling is
*let children of all ages CIO, includes infants
*believe to much loving can spoil a baby, but don't think twice about indulging children with cheap plastic toys
*live at McDonald's or Burger King
*can't understand why our county has a high teenage pregnancy rate, yet don't mind 14 yr olds dating 19 yr olds and feel fine about young girls listening to music, watch shows that promote degradation of women
*are miffed by high and increasing drop out rate, but then flaunt how they didn't graduate from high school/college and are doing just fine. School is secondary in importance. Getting a "real" job is number one.
* many think homebirth is illegal in this state, but it isn't.
*TV is a great babysitter
*50/50 on SAHMS and WOHMS
*Vaxxing is natural and common place. I was the only one in our center who had an exemption
*All laws are created by God, heathens must die (although I have seen ONE Darwin fish on a bumber stick, last year)
*the only preschools we have in our county are church sponsored. Kailey didn't go to preschool yet learned everything she needs to know for kindergarten from...US

Quote:
*Discipline: Most middle-class people don't but otherwise pretty common.
Do most then punish as apposed to discipline? Could you clarify, I'm a little confused. Thanks.
post #47 of 111
Curious....many here have a petpeeve with the kinds of clothes kids wear and comment that wearing character clothes is seen as 'low class' . How can you tell these people are looked upon as 'low class"? ...do people actually comment and say "Ugh...this kid is wearing a spiderman shirt...how low class." I definitely can understand CIO, gd , baby wearing, non-vaxing....but clothes?....huh? Talking about the kinds of clothes kids wear seems kind of petty to me. ....and IF people are noticing and commenting on the clothes kids wear....well...that seems kind of low class to me.
Anyway...sorry had to get that in....carry on
post #48 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by dolphinkisser
Curious....many here have a petpeeve with the kinds of clothes kids wear and comment that wearing character clothes is seen as 'low class' . How can you tell these people are looked upon as 'low class"? ...do people actually comment and say "Ugh...this kid is wearing a spiderman shirt...how low class." I definitely can understand CIO, gd , baby wearing, non-vaxing....but clothes?....huh? Talking about the kinds of clothes kids wear seems kind of petty to me. ....and IF people are noticing and commenting on the clothes kids wear....well...that seems kind of low class to me.
Anyway...sorry had to get that in....carry on
I was thinking the same thing. I am not big on character clothing as folks call it (wearing Tweedy or Mickey Mouse has never appealed to me and by extension not what I would buy for my kids). However calling it low class just seems wrong to me but that's just me.

Shay
post #49 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by pookel
This is kinda OT, but ... I see a lot of Parenting bashing here, but aside from the commercialism, they don't advocate much that I object to. They definitely lean toward GD (a typical article I saw recently was on how to explain to your relatives that you don't spank) and support bfing and cosleeeping (not so far as to say "everyone should do it," but I think it's fair to say they're in the camp of "good for you if you want to").
Compared to Mothering magazine, Parents and Parenting are very different. They feature lots of ads for plastic toys, bouncy seats and other baby devices, bottles, etc. The articles are very different. They rarely have articles on homeschooling or not circumcizing or breastfeeding until toddlerhood and beyond or cosleeping or anything that Mothering features a lot. They are just very different. Not bad, but different.
post #50 of 111
I just moved to an area where I feel out of place because I am NOT tandem nursing at the library lapsit!! Not that DD would mind sharing.

Seems most people do extended nursing, baby-wear and consciously co-sleep.

Not sure on vaxing as I don't discuss it, even where I was which was quite holistic more people seemed to vax and I felt uncomfortable saying I don't. However a good number did not vax and used some holistic treatments but would use Tylenol and Antibiotics if needed (which I would but have not had to but my threshold to use them is higher but thats because also homeopathy has worked up to now!) I would say 50:50 vaxed but not sure where I am at now.

But yikes DD has character clothing!!!!
post #51 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by boongirl
Compared to Mothering magazine, Parents and Parenting are very different. They feature lots of ads for plastic toys, bouncy seats and other baby devices, bottles, etc. The articles are very different. They rarely have articles on homeschooling or not circumcizing or breastfeeding until toddlerhood and beyond or cosleeping or anything that Mothering features a lot. They are just very different. Not bad, but different.
I know they're different, I have a subscription to Parenting.

What I don't get is I've seen people talking about how awful Parenting is and how it makes them mad and advocates everything mainstream, etc., etc. ... I mean, OK, sure, it's not Mothering. It has lots of ads for bottles. (I pretty much ignore the ads, personally. I'm talking about the actual magazine content.) But it's not unusual to read articles in Parenting that mention nursing toddlers. They often have articles about learning how to breastfeed and what to do about common breastfeeding problems. A recent front-page article on "is spanking OK?" went over all the pro-spanking arguments and concluded "no, it's not OK." I have seen advice columns that talk about sleep issues where the columnist says in an aside, "I cuddle all my kids to sleep ..." or "my kids actually still sleep with us ..."

I don't see what is so evil about all this. Kinda mainstream, maybe - but not the stereotypical "mainstream" people talk about on MDC that consists of "yell and hit your kid, let them cry all night, feed them formula from day 1, and buy them lots of cheap plastic toys."
post #52 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by pookel
I don't see what is so evil about all this. Kinda mainstream, maybe - but not the stereotypical "mainstream" people talk about on MDC that consists of "yell and hit your kid, let them cry all night, feed them formula from day 1, and buy them lots of cheap plastic toys."
Plus its good a more mainstream magazine at least is mentioning things like nursing, baby-wearing and not spanking and putting the idea out there more. Most mainstream mothers I meet are not like that at all in any case!
post #53 of 111
Interesting thread. Here's my mainstream (fairly pricey areas in large, East Coast cities):

Breastfeeding: 3-6 month is the norm, often with supplementation; I know 2 moms who BF for over a year--incidentally, these are the only two SAHMs I know; every other mom I know works (law, business, etc.)

*Co-sleeping: Nope.

*Vaxing: Done by pretty much everyone.

*Babywearing. Some--I see lots of Baby Bjorns, some slings and wraps. Today I saw a woman with a Moby Wrap AND a Bugaboo Stroller.

*Daycare: Basically not done. It's nanny central in this neck of the woods.

*Pre-school: Everyone--people tend to start their kids in activity classes (swimming, art, music) at around 2 years old.

*CIO: I do know a few people who "sleep-trained" their babies, but I don't think this is universal.

*Circ: Close to 100%.

*Discipline: No one spanks. As someone said, it's considered "low class." I think GD is more the norm, although people wouldn't call it that. Some time-out kinda stuff going on.

*TV: Some, but more often than not "educational" TV.

*Character Clothing. Nope. Considered very tacky.

*Toys: Combination of traditional toys (wooden blocks, etc.), character toys, lots of "educational" toys from places like Babies R Us (Lamaze, Baby Einstein, etc.) People definitely try to combat strict "gendering" of toys.

*Food: People eat pretty well relative to the SAD. I do see lots of jarred baby foods and pre-packed teething bicuits, etc., but there's also a lot of organics (dairy, produce, Whole Foods snacks, etc.). Just hung with a friend whose 2 yo ate 3-bean stew, a fish and spinach soup, and some organic crackers during the day. Fresh meat and cheese, rather than packaged stuff is the norm. Fast food very rarely, if at all. A lot of the kids I know go to upscale restaurants regularly.
post #54 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by boongirl
Compared to Mothering magazine, Parents and Parenting are very different. They feature lots of ads for plastic toys, bouncy seats and other baby devices, bottles, etc. The articles are very different. They rarely have articles on homeschooling or not circumcizing or breastfeeding until toddlerhood and beyond or cosleeping or anything that Mothering features a lot. They are just very different. Not bad, but different.
: Its funny that you mention this, I just bought a copy of Parenting yesterday and while it wasn't a bad magazine it was different. Definitely less substantial than Mothering. I also was not too enamoured of the ads.

Shay
post #55 of 111
Quote:
*Discipline: No one spanks. As someone said, it's considered "low class." I think GD is more the norm, although people wouldn't call it that. Some time-out kinda stuff going on.
I'm wondering if there is another name we can use to call people who spank, perhaps uneducated?

As spanking is not found solely in lower class households. I know some well-to-do families who spank, and some poor folks who know better.
post #56 of 111
Maybe I'm misinterpreting, but I believe that when people say that certain clothes or behaviors are considered "low class", they mean literally low class (not e.g. what people mean when they say that a rude person has "no class"), and they are reporting on the social patterns they see around them, not speaking from their own point of view. There are many ways in which people convey that clothing has class meaning. You can often pick out what socioeconomic group people belong to, within a community, by the way they dress. "High class" people often have contempt for the possessions and customs of "low class" people -- but without much awareness that their thinking is following a social class pattern. It is subtle: "Ugh, I would never buy that for my child" flows into, "I don't like my child to play with Johnny, because he is a bad influence" or "his parents have different values" (which coincidentally most of the other parents in the trailor park happen to share). In another thread here, we touched upon the issue of suburban kids wanting to look "like they're from the hood" (that's the urban equivalent of the trailor park). While of course there are always exceptions, spanking does, in general, attach to social patterns -- and that comes out in people's feelings and belief about it.
post #57 of 111
That's just odd. I'm personally glad that I don't know people who would say such things (and by know I mean people who are in my circle of friends. Sounds rather elitist to me.
post #58 of 111
i live in a rural, predominately caucasian, very low income region ~ our mainstreams:

*Breastfeeding: pretty much not done, not even attempted usually

*Co-sleeping: again, not really done.

*Vaxing: everyone vaccinates here, except one person i know, because it's a requirement for schools and just about everyone is in some kind of public school

*Babywearing: more parents are doing it ~ mostly younger parents. (oddly, i've seen lots of carried babies holding bottles of formula )

*Daycare: just about all the parents around here use daycare, even some of the ones who don't work

*Pre-school: it's considered very, very strange ~ by parents, teachers and doctors ~ if a child around here hasn't gone to preschool before starting kindegarten. one elementary school teacher didn't even want to admit a child to her class who hadn't attended preschool.

*CIO: it's expected

*Circ: again, pretty much everyone does it.

*Discipline: i don't know anyone around here who doesn't spank, except for the home visitor we've had (and she can't advocate it, by law )

*TV: most kids around here have a TV in their room; that's the main pasttime...

*Character Clothing: i honestly don't know. i don't see a lot of kids wearing character clothing... but my own kids loved their character shirts. i really don't know. for clothing in general, most kids just seem to wear whatever is popular at the local Wal*Mart. (right now that means that almost all the kids i see seem to be in uniforms of pink, brown and pseudo-camo.)

*Toys: cheap and plastic are the norm. lots of people get stuff from yard sales around here. the most used "toys" are video game consoles.

*Food: lots of fast food, lots of frozen and packaged stuff. the local school is sponsored by pretty much every major food corporation (including having Cheetoh days : ), and organic / natural foods are not readily available. the ones that ARE available cost so much, only the really upper-class people can afford them. i've been considered extremely odd for feeding my kids whole grain bread (one parent was astonished to see my child eating the crusts on the sandwich ) and i've been completely shunned before for not allowing my son to have a can of soda right before dinner.
post #59 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eminer
Maybe I'm misinterpreting, but I believe that when people say that certain clothes or behaviors are considered "low class", they mean literally low class (not e.g. what people mean when they say that a rude person has "no class"), and they are reporting on the social patterns they see around them, not speaking from their own point of view. There are many ways in which people convey that clothing has class meaning. You can often pick out what socioeconomic group people belong to, within a community, by the way they dress. "High class" people often have contempt for the possessions and customs of "low class" people -- but without much awareness that their thinking is following a social class pattern. It is subtle: "Ugh, I would never buy that for my child" flows into, "I don't like my child to play with Johnny, because he is a bad influence" or "his parents have different values" (which coincidentally most of the other parents in the trailor park happen to share). In another thread here, we touched upon the issue of suburban kids wanting to look "like they're from the hood" (that's the urban equivalent of the trailor park). While of course there are always exceptions, spanking does, in general, attach to social patterns -- and that comes out in people's feelings and belief about it.
Well what I think people around here are thinking (no one says "low class" unless we discuss it) is that they want their kids to look a certain way. Here it is sort of hip and cute.

A typical "cute" girls outfit would be like the one's I saw today at my best friend's daughter 7 y.o. b-day party: Leggings (tight to the lower calf in black, white or gray, blue jean mini skirt and lets say a tye-dye top) or a pair of pink capris with a pink and white flowered peasant top, or a pair of khaki walking shorts with pink flowers and a pink top with khaki flowers.

Very matched. Very pulled together. With matching sandals or crocs with jibbitz in them.

And , yes the two and three year olds are dressed the same way.

Character clothing would be viewed as ruining this look. As someone else said "tacky". It's not really expressed but what I gather from when we have talked about it directly is that wearing clothes with characters all over it is done by people who don't know better. I think that people would sort of view wearing garage sale or thrift shop clothes as understandable and not look down on it at all. But I think the thinking would be "if you can afford to buy your child new clothes that aren't super cheap why would you want them to walk around with some tacky character of their clothes."

As for spanking I think it is a thought here in the urban midwest, that it is only done by people in the lower classes here or by people in the South. It's a generalization/sterotype but that's what people I know think.
post #60 of 111
I live in a afluent mostly "white" suburb of LA (maybe about 30% Hispanic)- just 10 minutes from the Reagan Library- so that'll tell you the political leanings of this crowd.

*Breastfeeding- I think a great majority try it- many make it a year- very few beyond, but I'm always getting positive comments nursing my toddler.

*Co-sleeping: Many of the nursing moms do this very early on- but most so some form of CIO by about 6 months

*Vaxing: I have a skewed sense of this one, the only people who I talk to about this are my AP group- (over 100 members in our county) so I'm not sure.

*Babywearing. Some--I see lots of Baby Bjorns, once in a blue moon I see some slings and wraps. I'm leading a local babywearing NINO group and only have 30 members.

*Daycare: I would say 50-50. Half the mamas stay home the other half would be professionals using daycare.

*Pre-school: Everyone--people tend to start their kids in activity classes (swimming, art, music) at around 2 years old.

*CIO:Seems the norm at about 6 months.

*Circ: In the hispanic population almost 0- in the "white" I would guess 70-80%

*Discipline: Mostly "time outs" some spank out of "Biblical mandate" *gag*

*TV: Some, but more often than not "educational" TV.

*Character Clothing: Tons- especially the Disney Store stuff- I'm surprized it's considered low class in some areas cause it is real pricey!!!

*Toys: Combination of traditional toys (wooden blocks, etc.), character toys, lots of "educational" toys from places like Babies R Us (Lamaze, Baby Einstein, etc.) People definitely try to combat strict "gendering" of toys.

*Food: Whole Foods and Trader Joes are almost always jam packed!

This is fun and interesting!
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