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Discussion about UC birth - Page 7

post #121 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by fourlittlebirds
It seems like I (and many others) are constantly having to make the disclaimer that we don't hate midwives and didn't choose UC because we hate midwives. It is really tiresome.
: I think it's been said many times in this thread that no one is trying to be condescending towards anyone's birth choices. It has been said many times that each woman's individual preferences and choices regarding birth ARE respected and taken into consideration.

In my mind, my visual ideal of birth would be that globally, birth is considered normal, an everyday sacred event in which the woman experiencing it has the free, un-judged choice to give birth in any way she wants, with whomever she'd like to be present. Meddling's and the like would be kept to a serious minimum and medical intervention is reserved for serious emergencies, so as not to get carried away in the technocentric way that it is today.

Now, did that sound condescending? I hope not because it was never meant to.
post #122 of 238
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Originally Posted by moonfirefaery View Post
I tore with #1 and am afraid the same will happen with #2, for example.

Jenny, you say your second-degree tear healed naturally on its own. Are you 'altered' down there because of it? Did it take longer to heal than if it had stitches, do you think? This is one of my concerns. If everything can heal on its own, even a retained placenta, then that is a real relief. Do you think that's typical?
I healed naturally. I have "minor" alteration, but nothing that is really noticeable. I tore with my first birth (due to my birthing position), so I have nothing to compair it with. It was tender for a few days, and would sting a bit when I used the bathroom, but after that I have had no problems at all. I was surprised with my second birth when I did not sting for a few days (I just thought that was part of having a baby ). I never did tear again other than perhaps a skid mark. I have heard that everything can heal on its own so long as there is no fisure (sp?) and it is kept clean.

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When did you all go to the hospital for a postpartum check-up and well-baby visit? I would wnat to make sure everything was okay with me and the baby, just in case, or at least to be made aware of any thing I should watch out for maybe. I was thinking within two days would be good, but sometimes that seems like such a short time and sometimes it seems so long, too!
I have never gone to the hospital, ever. I have never gone in for a pp checkup, ever. I have taken my newborn to a pedi, usually within a day or two (at least before the cord drops off) for a well checkup (and I ONLY do this so that I will have the "new baby" record for the birth certificate; and I do this before the cord falls off for the verification of dates).

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What would you consider a circumstance where transfer would be required?
EXCESSIVE blood loss that could not be stopped.
Me passing out (high b/p).
Excrutiating pain (I am VERY high pain tollerant, and if I could not handle it I would know there was something wrong).
Real "gut" instinct.
A Word straight from God!

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Are there any circumstances where you would not consider a homebirth at all?
Placenta Priva only. If I was not considering a HB, it would be because I was planning a c/s.

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I feel safe and comfortable at home, where I am free and in control, and it seems so pleasant to give birth there.
This is one of the main reasons I feel hb is right for me. I also feel UC is right because I can not "perform" with an audience.

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I would love more info on pain management techniques
For me, I have to just focus on relaxing. Totally and completely when the contraction begins. I have found that working "with" the contraction (relaxing and allowing it to do it's thing) makes things much easier than if you work "against" it by tensing up (which is what I naturally do in pain).

But then again, I am sure I am not a great person to give advice on this. As I stated above, I am VERY high pain tollerant. I have nearly had my toe cut off, never saying a word, and broke my clavical (sp?) playing football with my brothers, and never saw a doctor, or even cried out loud (although I did shed a couple of silent tears), the same when I sprang my ankle. I have also given birth to eight children without so much as a scream, a raised voice, or even vocalizations. I just breath loudly (like "loud" sighs). That is just me.
post #123 of 238
Thanks so much. I feel a lot more comfortable about it now. I would be afraid of something happening but the nearest ER is only 10 minutes away so I'm not that worried. My big fear is that the baby will come out with something wrong that I cannot fix and die before he gets professional help if he needs it :/

Can anyone explain to me the procedure for cleaning/filling a birthing pool? What temperature should the water be? what should I clean it with, and when/how often before the birth?

What's the procedure for cord cutting? When should I do it, how should I sterilize the scissors? What about cord unwrapping?

Any tips for infant resuscitation / how long before I should call 911?

What about the placenta? Should I try to push it out right after the baby, or wait a few minutes? Or will it come out on its own or what? The doctor had me deliver it right after the baby came out.

I've got to figure out the specifics, the 'how-to' of birth. Last time I had someone directing me and wasn't really involved very much except for pushing.
post #124 of 238
I'll pick apart your questions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonfirefaery View Post
I would be afraid of something happening but the nearest ER is only 10 minutes away so I'm not that worried. My big fear is that the baby will come out with something wrong that I cannot fix and die before he gets professional help if he needs it.
MOST things that can and do go wrong with a birth, that can be prevented or corrected will have time for transport. So being only minutes away from help is really most all you will need. If you were in the hospital, in many instances, they would have to call the DR, and then wait for him anyways, so help from the ER DR would usually result in the same or faster response from a DR. There are always exceptions, though. However, many babies that die "minutes" from birth have problems that would cause survival to be in jepardy anyways.
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Can anyone explain to me the procedure for cleaning/filling a birthing pool? What temperature should the water be? what should I clean it with, and when/how often before the birth?
Sorry, I have never had a water birth.

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What's the procedure for cord cutting? When should I do it?
I wait until the cord is white and cold, and there in no blood left in it. It is usually after the delivery of the placenta. I may tie it or clamp it temporarily, but after a day, I trim it real short and remove tie or clamp at that time.

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How should I sterilize the scissors?
Sometimes I have totally forgotten to sterilize them at all. If there is no blood in the cord to transport the germs to the bood stream, then there is really no reason to fear infection. One of the benefits of delayed cord clamping.

However, I do try and sterilize them, usually with rubbing alcohol. If they are completely metal, you can place them in boiling water for, I think it is, 20 minutes. If you use alcohol, you should completely cover them (like by laying them in a bowl) for about 10 seconds. It is just as effective to pour the alcohol over the blade, but I think it is easier to have them in a dish, that way they are ready when you are ready.

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What about cord unwrapping?
If the cord is tight around the babies neck, you can just unwrap it once the head is out. However, in my cases, I have never really worried about it. The cord is usually plenty long enough and it is also stretchy and strong. So most of the time, you would never have to do anything at all.

IF there is a true case there the cord was around the neck, the baby's head was turning blue and would not come farther out (indicating the cord is too short) you would simply put two clamps (or tie it in two places) on the cord while it is around the babies neck and snip in between. Thus, the cord is realeased from around the neck and baby is no longer in danger. This rarely happens. Like my previous post stated (somewhere on this thread I believe), ALL my babies had their cords wrapped around their necks. Some once, some twice, and one three times. I never had any problmes because of it, and NEVER had to cut the cord before the birth for it.

As for a "knot" in the cord. (Although you did not ask, but many do) The cord is so slippery and squishy that knots don't generally cause any problmes at all. In the rare event that there is a knot in the cord, there is really nothing you can do about it, and there is nothing that any Dr could do about it. You can't tell there is a knot until after the birth, or at least until the cord can be seen. By that time the baby is completely usually out or almost out. And again, knots in the cord are rare, and a knot in the cord that causes a problem is rare in group that does have them. So there is no need to concern about that.

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Any tips for infant resuscitation?
I took infant/chil CPR. I believe any parent would benefit from it, especially if they are doing a UC.

The first thing to remember is that as long as the cord is pulsing (and still attached to baby) there is no need for them to breathe. Baby is getting oxygen from the placenta.

If a baby is not breathing or not breathing well after a birth, body stimulization usually works, all by it self. This is why the nurses are so "rough" with babies, rubbing them so hard. It stimulates circulation.

It would also be wise to succion out Baby's nose and mouth, in the event of breathing problems. A succion bulb, machine, or just your mouth on theirs would work.

If a baby is still not breathing, infant cpr can be performed. Most of the time, IF there is no birth defect creating the problem, it will not come to this. However if it does, you just have to do what you have to do. That is why you train for it. Take classes. Don't worry about doing it "perfectly". Most of the time, if it comes down to cpr, once the baby takes a breath, they pink right up and are perfectly fine.
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How long before I should call 911?
FOR ME, if my baby "pinked" up after whatever I did, I would not call 911. People always say, "sure you say that, but when it happens to you..." So I must qualify my statement with, "It DID happen to me".

My first born was born and did not breathe for 8 minutes. We gave her cpr for that time. Then she took her first breath, and pinked right up. Took her for a "check up" later that day, and they pronouned her perfectly healthy.

How long would I have waited to call 911, I don't know. I do know that she ALWAYS had a heart beat, just did not breath. If there were no heart beat, then that could indicate additional problems, and I would probably have called. (By the way, she is a perfectly healthy, sometimes frusterating, 16 year old now. )

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What about the placenta? Should I try to push it out right after the baby, or wait a few minutes? Or will it come out on its own or what? The doctor had me deliver it right after the baby came out.
The placenta will come out on its own. You don't have to "decide" to push it out. After the birth of the baby, there is usually a lag in the contractions for a few minutes, at times it can be up to an hour or more. But at some point, they will begin again. Not the same intensity of before, but you will know them. And when you have one you may gently push (if you choose) or you may let your body do it on it's own. With my births, I delivered all my placentas within 15 minutes of the birth, and usually about 5 minutes after.

My experience goes something like this...
Baby emerges. Beautiful and "slimey". I take baby to my chest to hold, cuddle, and examine. Cord is left in tact. As I sit there enjoying my new baby, I feel the need to "pass off the baby". As I hand the baby over to whom ever, I feel a contraction begin, and after one or maybe two the placenta emerges. Then I am done and feel like showering.

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I've got to figure out the specifics, the 'how-to' of birth. Last time I had someone directing me and wasn't really involved very much except for pushing.
I have found that in the absense of someone else "directing" you on what to do, you will naturally just do what feels right. And it usually is. The only complication to this natural instinct is fear. Rid yourself of fear but prepairing yourself mentally. Educating yourself. Or simply by praying or thinking positively. Once you let go of the fear, natural instince usually just takes over.

Hope I have helped some. I love my HBs and UCs. I can not imagine doing it any other way.
post #125 of 238
Thanks! That is even more reassuring. I'm running out of questions here! Which is a good thing, lol. I'm still worried about something going wrong but not so afraid that something is going to go wrong that would have been taken care of better in the hospital. I'm going to have to tell my husband all this to reassure him and my family.
post #126 of 238
I am planning a MW assited HB but want to be prepared for an accidental UC.

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If the cord is tight around the babies neck, you can just unwrap it once the head is out. However, in my cases, I have never really worried about it. The cord is usually plenty long enough and it is also stretchy and strong. So most of the time, you would never have to do anything at all.
I had my last ds in the hospital and he had a very tight double nuchal cord. The OB said it was too tight and she had to cut it off before I finished pushing him out. He was limp and not breathing. His head was very blue compared to his body and he had to be resuscitated. My cord was not short so that was not the issue. I was told the issue was because the double nuchal cord was so tight. It may be worth noting that when my water broke during pushing there was heavy mec staining. I was 2 weeks past EDD and had been pushing for a good while, he was 9 and half lbs with a 15 inch head.

What would you do in that situation? Would you not have cut the cord off before fully birthing him?

A few months after having him I really got into processing the birth and even posted asking if others thought it was really necessary for his cord to be cut off like that. Every single response was a yes including more than one UCer. If you know something they didn't I would love to hear it because this is one point of contention with my hubby and I on the point of even having an HB this time.
post #127 of 238
i think the difficulty is whether or not there is true knot, how tight that knot is, and then whether or not there is blood flow through the cord. if there is blood flow, then there is also oxygen flow.

i would have birthed him more, removed the cord from his neck and tried to open the knot a bit (unless it was open enough), and continued with birth and then started infant CPR to get him breathing (if necessary).

the reason is that the cord--unless compressed completely by the knot--is providing oxygen, hormones, and nutrients through the placenta during (and after) the birth. by cutting the cord early, she cut off his oxygen supply through his cord before he was ready to breathe (which happens after birth)--which likely caused him to be 'more blue.'

unless the cord was compressed during birth--decreasing or stopping the flow of blood through the cord--the baby was getting enough oxygen to survive outside of the womb without breathing until the placenta detaches.

and if the baby isn't breathing on his/her own in the first few minutes, with the placenta still attached to mom, you're in good shape to start the breathing, typically back massage or infant CPR.

and here's a resource: http://gentlebirth.org/archives/nuchlcrd.html
post #128 of 238
there was no knot in the cord. I was told by the OB who caught him, that it would have been dangerous to push him further out without cutting the cord because it was so tight and would have become tighter the further out he came. Is that hooey?

Yes it is a shame that the ones who need delayed cord clamping the most can't get it. That was a part of my birth plan that didn't happen and I was dissapointed about that. I sought education to see if it could have been avoided and I have not found one source who says it should not have been cut off.

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unless the cord was compressed during birth--decreasing or stopping the flow of blood through the cord--the baby was getting enough oxygen to survive outside of the womb without breathing until the placenta detaches
yes the compressing during birth must have been happening because of his condition when he immediately emerged from my body. I did not have any fetal monitoring during pushing. I only had a hand held doppler briefly hours earlier. I'm thankful for that because had I had the monitoring surely they would have wisked me off for a c-section when the compressing was happening and it wouldn't have been necessary because ds was fine after being resuscitated.

early cord cutting would not cause the baby to be blue that fast.
post #129 of 238
Quote:
First, she's not talking only about women on MDC, and second, she's not saying that for women to choose a midwife-attended homebirth in itself is sad. She's saying that it's sad for women to have to make the choice based on lack of confidence.
Ah, well, there is my mistake... I thought we were talking about the MDC community as this is a discussion amongst MDC members.

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It seems like I (and many others) are constantly having to make the disclaimer that we don't hate midwives and didn't choose UC because we hate midwives. It is really tiresome.
I'm sorry you feel that way. For the record I would never come on the UC board and comment one way or the other about the community there's opinions about midwives, because it is your community. I did share my feelings here in direct response to something which I felt/feel was disparaging of midwives (sadness over a woman choosing one) and because it is on a board which is not exclusive to UCers.

Anyways while I certainly meant no offense to you or any other UCer, I felt I needed to explain my position and why I was offended by that statement.
post #130 of 238
oh and I meant to talk about that link. I have looked at that before and it further supported the need for my ds's cord to be cut which is why I do worry about a UC because I worry about being able to do it myself safely. Such situation is rare but since it has already possibly happened to me once it is something that is real to me. I think I know why it happened though. I found out ds was breech and started Webster at 38 weeks and my ds flipped head down after the first visit. He went head up again within a day or two and I continued Webster and he went head down again. Maybe just coincidence, but I don't think so
post #131 of 238
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I was told by the OB who caught him, that it would have been dangerous to push him further out without cutting the cord because it was so tight and would have become tighter the further out he came. Is that hooey?
Imagine the mechanics of it: the baby's head stays close to the perineum, and the rest of the body somersaults out. What exactly is causing a tightening of the cord, then?

I have more thoughts about your situation, but I'm being very slow about formulating them, and I have to go right now, so that'll have to wait!
post #132 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by erin_brycesmom View Post
I had my last ds in the hospital and he had a very tight double nuchal cord. The OB said it was too tight and she had to cut it off before I finished pushing him out. He was limp and not breathing. His head was very blue compared to his body and he had to be resuscitated. My cord was not short so that was not the issue. I was told the issue was because the double nuchal cord was so tight. It may be worth noting that when my water broke during pushing there was heavy mec staining. I was 2 weeks past EDD and had been pushing for a good while, he was 9 and half lbs with a 15 inch head.

What would you do in that situation? Would you not have cut the cord off before fully birthing him?

A few months after having him I really got into processing the birth and even posted asking if others thought it was really necessary for his cord to be cut off like that. Every single response was a yes including more than one UCer. If you know something they didn't I would love to hear it because this is one point of contention with my hubby and I on the point of even having an HB this time.
First off, IF there is a real need, I would simply put two clamps on the cord and cut between them, just as the OB did.

HOWEVER, "My cord was not short so that was not the issue", tells me that it may not have been necessary. If the cord is just tight, but plenty long enough, it should be just a matter of loosening it and slipping it over the head.

As PP stated, if there was pulsing in the cord, then the baby was getting blood and oxygen. If the short amount of time that it would take from baby's head emerging to body emerging, I, personally, would have just let it happen naturally. Unless there was a large amount of time, or unless the cord was real taunt with no pulsing, I would not worry. By leaving the cord in tact, if pulsing, the baby is better off.

But again, if it were necessary to actually cut the cord, it is simply done. But OBs are, in general, "cut cord" happy. They want that cut ASAP and will do just about anything to get it done. I have seen so many births that the OBs, and at times even the MWs, cut the cord before the baby totally emerges, no matter what. The sooner they cut the cord, the faster they can wisk away the baby after the birth. It is a very rare circumstance where NOT cutting the cord early is dangerous.
post #133 of 238
fourlittlebirds - I would love to hear any additonal thoughts you have

kidzaplenty - I'm not sure how much more clear I can be. The cord was so tight that it could not be loosened. Somehow I am not getting that accross it seems.

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Unless there was a large amount of time, or unless the cord was real taunt with no pulsing, I would not worry
yes it was taking a good deal of time and the cord was very taut. I am not sure about the pulsing. I know there was no blood spatter when she cut it.

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But again, if it were necessary to actually cut the cord, it is simply done.
huh? Definitely NOT simply done in my eyes. I could barely even reach down there and I could not see what i was doing. Taking scissors to something very tightly wrapped around my unborn baby's neck area is not anything I would describe as simple. I would have to get a mirror and try to somehow get it into a position where I could see which would be extremely difficult given that I could not squat and would need both hands to be able to cut a very tight cord. I have played it over and over again in my head and it scares the crap out of me. If I were to end up with an accidental UC that would most likely be just me, not my husband given his military work schedule.

I don't think the OB was cord cutting happy, but I am not fully convinced what she did was necessary either. She did know that I wanted DCC and she fully respected all of my other birth desires with no contest (and they were all uncommon). She was very hands off up until that point. My doula actually took a picture of her cutting the cord. Can I tell from that if it was still pulsing? What do I look for?
post #134 of 238
I'm glad this thread was started, as I had never even heard of UC (unless it was an accident ) until I came to MDC.

From where I stand today, if/when we have another child, I would not be comfortable with UC. My reasons are sad, but the truth is, that I'm afraid of the birth process. After two hospital inductions, my impression of birth is that it's scary, full of complications, and it's a tug-of-war between my wants and what a doctor thinks is "best" for me. I do know with every fiber of my being that I will NEVER have another hospital birth, but even birthing at home with a midwife will be a new, and somewhat fearful experience for me. I don't have the sense that I can handle the amount of pain that I may have, because I've been medicated the other two times. The pain is an unknown part of birth for me.

We hope to have many children, and my hope is that just by having a natural birth at home, maybe I can learn to trust my body again. Perhaps after one successful HB, I could consider UC. I love the idea of it because I really believe that my ideal birth would be quiet, peaceful, and intimate.

Thank you to those of you that shared such an intimate part of yourselves with all of us!
post #135 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by erin_brycesmom View Post
kidzaplenty - I'm not sure how much more clear I can be. The cord was so tight that it could not be loosened. Somehow I am not getting that accross it seems.
I am sorry if I gave you the wrong impression. I was not suggesting that your situation could have been different. I was just stating how I would have handled the situation given a certain set of circumstances. Not knowing anything about your birth, I would never presume to say what should or should not have been done.

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yes it was taking a good deal of time and the cord was very taut. I am not sure about the pulsing. I know there was no blood spatter when she cut it.
It sounds to me like the cord was indeed tight and MAY have needed cutting. However, time does seem to stand still or rush ahead at any given time depending on the circumstances. It is possible that the time frame was not that long. If the cord is tight, it could prevent decent of baby down the birth canal, although I have never heard of this if the cord was long enough. But your OB could have been absolutely correct in cutting when she/he did.

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But again, if it were necessary to actually cut the cord, it is simply done.
huh? Definitely NOT simply done in my eyes. I could barely even reach down there and I could not see what i was doing. Taking scissors to something very tightly wrapped around my unborn baby's neck area is not anything I would describe as simple. I would have to get a mirror and try to somehow get it into a position where I could see which would be extremely difficult given that I could not squat and would need both hands to be able to cut a very tight cord. I have played it over and over again in my head and it scares the crap out of me. If I were to end up with an accidental UC that would most likely be just me, not my husband given his military work schedule.
Again, not really responding to your specific situation, as every situation is different, there are ways to do what must be done. I keep on hand three items, in the event of this rare complication; 2 cord clamps and 1 large pair of surgical scissors (these are very sharp, but have a blunt nub on the bottom tip to allow them to slip between layers without poking or cutting in the wrong place).

Generally this situation is so rare that there is no need to worry about it. Also, there is usually a possibility that someone will be nearby to help if necessary. However, I have found, that for ME, in emergency situations, I can do most anything that I put my mind to. I would have to do it by touch, of course, but could reach down and put on the clamps, then feel again and cut where needed. It is quite a simple procedure, yet due to the very nature of having a baby sticking out down there, it could be tricky. But I must state again, that the true emergency in a situation like this is very rare.

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I don't think the OB was cord cutting happy, but I am not fully convinced what she did was necessary either. She did know that I wanted DCC and she fully respected all of my other birth desires with no contest (and they were all uncommon). She was very hands off up until that point. My doula actually took a picture of her cutting the cord. Can I tell from that if it was still pulsing? What do I look for?
I am not sure that a picture will be able to show one way or another, but maybe I am wrong. The one thing that you could look at would be the color. If there was no blood in the cord (cord so tight that no blood could get through), the cord should be white. If there were blood in the cord, it should look blue or purplish.

Plus, the cord being wrapped is in no way "genetic" or in any way foreseeable or preventable. It will happen or not happen. You can prepair for the worst, but you must deal with birth as it happens, on it's terms. Learning infant CPR is a VERY good idea, and one that could be very useful in UCing. That is about as prepaired as you can get for cord problems; that, and keeping cord clamps and scissors on hand.

I hope that something I have shared from my experineces has helped you in any way. But I never want to infer that I know the "right" way. All anyone can do is to share what is right for them and pass on advice based on their own experiences and education. The rest is up to you.
post #136 of 238
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Originally Posted by prettypixels View Post
I did share my feelings here in direct response to something which I felt/feel was disparaging of midwives (sadness over a woman choosing one) and because it is on a board which is not exclusive to UCers.
Which is totally appropriate. My comment was in regard not to that but to your generalization of UCers as having disdain for midwives.

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Originally Posted by erin_brycesmom
I was told by the OB who caught him, that it would have been dangerous to push him further out without cutting the cord because it was so tight and would have become tighter the further out he came. Is that hooey?
Once the head is out, the body doesn't continue to just inch out. The body comes out all at once, and at that point the baby can be unwrapped. If the cord is very short, but long enough that the head has been able to be born, the baby's body will simply somersault out.

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Originally Posted by erin_brycesmom
It may be worth noting that when my water broke during pushing there was heavy mec staining.
Hm. Well, this indicates to me that there was distress before the baby started descending. Because the baby wouldn't have been trying to breathe at that point, it wouldn't have been caused by choking and because the baby had not descended yet it wouldn't have been caused by cord compression. So there must have been other issues going on. For instance, were you on your back? If so, that could have compromised the blood flow to the baby.
post #137 of 238
so much to know-- to say that at home I have never seen a situation where the cord had to be cut before birth- I have talked with many other midwives and it is a very rare occasion indeed-- so when I hear that it was something of import in the hospital it could be or more likely they fell back on the routines they are use to if the doc who catches your baby is not a GP then he/she is probably not going to be comfortable dealing with the baby- that is left to others in the delivery room who are there for that purpose.
and I wanted to comment about this statement
"early cord cutting would not cause the baby to be blue that fast."

it can be very normal for a baby to look blue at emergence and for a small amount of time after birth- leaving a pulsing cord attached actually means that the baby is not going without a gas exhange- many babies come out a little stunned and take a small amount of time to organize good breathing- the act of breathing is what causes shunting and the cord to transition from the primary source of gas exchange to being not used in some babies it is instantly and in others it takes a bit of time---
post #138 of 238
Jenny, thanks for sharing your perspective and experiences with me. It has been helpful. The cord does look very white in the picture but what I thought was scissors may be a metal clamping devise so that might explain it.

ETA - I have actually read some evidence that suggests that it is not unusual for the same mother to continue to have nuchal cords and cord accidents with subsequent babies.

Fourlittlebirds - thanks for your perspective as well. I guess I just don't understand why the cord was so taut and whether it would have become more taut but I suppose I'll never know.

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Hm. Well, this indicates to me that there was distress before the baby started descending.
The baby had already started descending when my water broke. My water broke while I was pushing.

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For instance, were you on your back? If so, that could have compromised the blood flow to the baby.
Nope, no back pushing for me. First I squatted for a while but I wasn't making any progress that way and I eventually became physically unable to squat anymore so I pushed the rest of the way on my hands and knees which felt amazing.

thanks for all the info. I think everyone should try to prepare themselves for a UC even if they plan on having an attendant.
post #139 of 238
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"early cord cutting would not cause the baby to be blue that fast."

it can be very normal for a baby to look blue at emergence and for a small amount of time after birth- leaving a pulsing cord attached actually means that the baby is not going without a gas exhange
What I was trying to get accross is that my son had a blue/purple face and the rest of his body looked much better. I can even see in the picture that his face was purple before the cord was cut. I pushed him out immediately after the cord was cut...well I started pushing while she was still cutting, lol. His head already looked that way and looked that way immediately so I know the cord cutting isn't what caused his face to look so blue.
post #140 of 238
could have been the cord or could have been just pooling of blood in the head-- cutting the cord asap actually necessitates resuscitation efforts to be taken because the baby is cut off from its life support at that point which would be before the body has shunted the heart to increase circulation to the lungs--- so there is not time for transition the baby has to breath instantly- or else use up oxygen that is already in the body...
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