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Do you fantasize about being a farmer? - Page 3

Poll Results: Do you fantasize about being a farmer?

 
  • 7% (10)
    No, never
  • 4% (6)
    Yes, about once a year
  • 13% (18)
    Yes, about once a month
  • 31% (41)
    Yes, about once a week
  • 36% (48)
    Yes, nearly every day
  • 6% (8)
    I am a farmer
131 Total Votes  
post #41 of 64
Every. Single. Day. Multiple times a day. I won't feel like my family's food supply is safe until I do it.

I could *maybe* satisfy myself with buying local from farmers I know, but I'm in urban Southern California. There are no local farmers. And even though DH and I talk frequently about our future hobby farm on one of those awesome BC islands, I need to work on making my mountain hillside productive. I have the chickens (only 6, but it's a start), but I need to work on produce. I have rocky, arid, steep slopes and 1001 ground squirrels and chipmunks. I can *see* in my mind how to terrace the hillside for raised beds, but actually doing the work is another matter all together. But you know what? If these guys can do it (http://www.pathtofreedom.com/), then I can do it
post #42 of 64
oh i wish i wish i wish i was getting my hands dirty...and building our house out of cob, too......all in good time, right?
post #43 of 64
yup me too!!!
post #44 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenmommy View Post
Ummmm... I voted, I "am" the farmer. I grew up on a farm, we now live just down the road from it. It's a LOT of work. We have a big garden (I'm in the middle of canning tomatoes, making salsa, freezing broccoli, etc.), we have chickens, cows, rabbits, horses, seasonally pigs. It is a commitment. You can't be gone for the day without making arrangements for who will take care of the animals while you're away. Farming isn't optional in yucky weather; animals need care, cows need milking rain or shine, snow, wind, hail, heat. The garden needs tending even when it's 95F, and you've been out in the field all day. Hay needs putting up, and it's *always* ready on the hottest day of the year (I think it's Murphy's Law or something).

There is always something to do, no matter how hard you work. I am presently in the middle of about 5 projects, all are big, and all need attention right now. (I'm making excellent progress, can't you tell?)

I'd love to have some fruit trees, but the goat ate part of them, and we've not gotten around to planting more.

It's very rewarding to open the freezer and see your own beef, veggies, and butter. To open the fridge and see milk, eggs, yogurt, etc. from your own cow. To know that the food you eat is what you planted. But it is a *LOT* of work. To watch the newborn calves get up and nurse for the first time. To go for a ride with my children. To go with Grandpa on a hayride and bonfire.

Don't have any fantasies about it being the easy life, because it isn't. It is a good life, but certainly not easy. Most people have no idea how much work it is to cultivate your own land. It's definitely not for the faint of heart or weak of body.

I wouldn't trade it, though! Every time we talk about moving, I think about what we would lose, and I just can't get excited about that. It is definitely a good life!
I grew up that way and miss it like crazy. The only thing I have to add is that there is nothing more satisfying than taking Grand Champion Quality at the county fair with a steer that you raised from a cow that you watched be born, that was bred to a bull that you helped select, and beating the snotty neighbor kid who traveled 6 hours to Montana to pick out a purebred. Snarky aint I!

And there is a lot to be said for the asset rich, cash poor farmer...btdt!
post #45 of 64
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurel723 View Post
there is nothing more satisfying than taking Grand Champion Quality at the county fair with a steer that you raised from a cow that you watched be born, that was bred to a bull that you helped select, and beating the snotty neighbor kid who traveled 6 hours to Montana to pick out a purebred.
We had a story or two like that at our fairs too. This one guy had the Grand Champion Springer Heifer in Kern County -- a big deal in a dairy area. He was as poor as a church mouse. Better than winning that contest is that he got all the girls as well.
post #46 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnC View Post
It took me nearly ten years to get to this point, but now I actually do get nearly all my food from local farmers whom I know! Beef, milk, butter, cream from my cow share friend; eggs, pork, more beef, bones, and lard from my best friend's backyard farm; vegetables from a local organic farm coop, plus I grow a few vegetables and herbs myself and freeze or dry them(herbs); chickens from Skagit Valley Ranch, a nearby commercial organic, pasture-based farm. Wild fish from my brother-in-law's fishing trips to Alaska, and wild clams from my brother who clams the Oregon and Washington coast whenever the season opens. Also, I often go to the Oregon coast and buy fresh-caught fish and crab from a local fisherman. Wild blackberries grow everywhere at this time of year, and I pick them and make unsweetened freezer jam. I go to the store for a few organic vegetables, wild shellfish, and dry goods. I think I feel more like a hunter-gatherer than a farmer

I LOVE this!

Ann
You should love it! You're living my dream life. :
post #47 of 64
That is great Ann!!
post #48 of 64
My dream is to own and live off of a farm!
post #49 of 64
yeah me too.
post #50 of 64
Every day! We would like a large homested where we are almost self-sufficient (couldn't raise meat except for chickens). We fantisize (sp?) of fruit orchards, large garden of veggies and herbs (mostly medicinal), dairy and eggs. It truly is our dream but I don't think it'll ever happen as we don't want to leave our parents and I don't see them ever moving.
post #51 of 64
Laurel, yeah, it was always fun to beat the pants off the kids whose parents spent a boatload on their steers or whatever. And I had a great compliment from a trainer working with a girl who leased one of my horses. The girl was having trouble getting my horse to listen to her, and the trainer wanted to know who had finished him, because he was so quick, anticipated what you were going to ask, and super smooth in everything. We bought that horse with only one speed, fastforward. I taught him everything. I rodeoed on him, did hunter-jumper with him, trails, dressage, showmanship, you name it. And we beat people on expensive horses with name-brand trainers! It was fun!

I miss those days, they were great!
post #52 of 64
you make me sad...hehe..We had horses growing up and I am not likely to be able to own them again..I miss them....bums me that my kids won't get to experience that like I did.

What fun it was.
post #53 of 64
My husband fantasizes about us becoming farmers/ranchers. I really long to live a simpler life, closer to the land, where I learn to be more self-sufficient, but I don't know if I would say that I want to be a full-fledged farmer I do want to have a couple of chickens and a garden, and lots of room for my kids to roam.
post #54 of 64
I voted once a week. I fantasize about having organic, free-range, raw everything but then I quickly come down to earth and realize I couldn't handle the committment and work. I grew up in the city, oh well. I would like a little property one day to have a decent garden and live near an organic farm and ranch to get these products locally.
post #55 of 64
Yup. Almost every day. Traded the horse for dd2 and now I fantasize about having our own cows, chickens, goats, sheep, a couple of shepherd dogs, more horses . . .

The only thing I wouldn't be able to do is slaughter.
post #56 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobluegirl View Post
you make me sad...hehe..We had horses growing up and I am not likely to be able to own them again..I miss them....bums me that my kids won't get to experience that like I did.

What fun it was.
As much as I love how we live, it is really not very much like the way I grew up. I was defnitely a farm kid, and my children are not. I have two who don't particularly like to be dirty, although they do enjoy what comes out of the dirt, and eating stuff we've grown/picked. I feel sad sometimes that they won't experience a lot of the things I did, because I know that I'm better off having had those experiences. Growing up a farm kid really makes you a strong person, in a way that you don't get growing up in a suburb or the city. Not that those kids don't have other things going for them, it's just different.
post #57 of 64
yup totally....my sis never enjoyed it. I love the country...I am smack in the middle of the city now and I dont really enjoy it...lol

at one point in time my folks had:
7 horses
1 donkey
5 goats
2 pigs
10 cows
lots of chickens

I would at least be able to have a horse, cow and a few chickens...hehe
post #58 of 64
Yes, I wanna live in the country and grow some veggies and have chickens and either a goat or cow for milk! I'm sick of city living.
post #59 of 64
Yeah . . . I think about it everyday. Somedays I want a farm/homestead more than anything and the next day I grateful I live in town (although we do have chickens and a large garden).
But living in town on 1/3 acre has taught me how much I can do on that small chunk of earth. At one point we had 8 chickens and two goats (don't tell the zoning people at City Hall). I figure if I can't make good use of the land I have, I probably don't need that much to begin with.
post #60 of 64
I like to think about it as well... but mainly just for myself. I cannot stand the idea of growing food for people and leeching the minerals from the soil..

the only way i would do it voluntarily is if i set up my own high tech community that would return all the raw sewage, composted back to the soil in a perfect little eco system.

In fact sometimes i imagine building this community... i know it sounds crazy. but at least i know the food will taste better than anywhere else on earth
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