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How long would you labor.....?

post #1 of 62
Thread Starter 
How long would you labor before going to the hospital?

I believe the baby will come out on it's own time, and if I have to labor for a week then so be it. So how long would you trust and be paitient with your body? The women back then had to labor for as long as their body labored for no pain killers nothing to speed it up or give it a break, and they birthed a healthy baby, so why should time be an issue for transfer. It would not be for me.
post #2 of 62
I don't think the issue would be "how long" but a question of whether any complications are arising.

I'd be checking the heartbeat of the baby, how often would depend on what was going on (for example, just daily if I would just having mild contractions, but more frequently if I had PROM).

With PROM I'd take my own temperature.

If I were just in mild labor for days, I wouldn't sweat it. I'd probably do the usual - walking, sex (if no ROM), etc. Though I personally wouldn't do castor oil or anything nasty like that.
post #3 of 62
yeah, i'd only transfer if i felt/thought it was necessary, regardless of how long labor was.
post #4 of 62
I agree with the pp...

I had long labours (posterior babies)... I was transfered with #1... I tried to say no but I had no support besides DH and was not too informed on what labour could be like.. (the midwifes, my mother and my grandmother kept on arguing with me for about an hour before I finally said yes) I would have stayed at the birthing center if I would have known more... or at home f I would have known what I know now...

With ds#2 I did say no to the transfer and instead of trying all the things they wanted me to do I dicided to relax and try to sleep and slept through transition....

This time I am prepared to go for as long as it takes... to get as much rest as possible and let my body do what it needs to do...
I have confidence that I will know if I need to transfer...
post #5 of 62
Thread Starter 
Yeah I probably would not do anything like blood presure, temperature, pelvic exams etc, nothing other then remain positive and let nature take it's course. Doing all those things would stress me out.
post #6 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxye View Post
With ds#2 I did say no to the transfer and instead of trying all the things they wanted me to do I dicided to relax and try to sleep and slept through transition....



You slept through transition??????



I'm not worthy!!!! I'm scum!!! You are the goddess of labor! I'm not worthy!!
post #7 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by laohaire View Post


You slept through transition??????



I'm not worthy!!!! I'm scum!!! You are the goddess of labor! I'm not worthy!!
no please... get up! get up!
I am just a good example of how strong endorphins can be after 20 hours... I layed down and shut everyone out after about 10 hours of being at about 4 cm.... fell asleep and would wake up slightly when I had a contraction and then would fall asleep again... a medwife came in and talk me that I should wake up and try to start labour again so I just moved to go onto my right side and was hit by a massive contraction and my body started pushing...
I remember hearing about a woman doing something simular in another birth that was talked about in one of the pre-natal classes...
post #8 of 62
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post #9 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by freebirth2 View Post
How long would you labor before going to the hospital?...It would not be for me.
freebirth, PLEASE stopping ASSUMING you understand what a long labour feels like!!!!

I know you *believe* with everything in you that you would not transfer no matter what. With long labours (I mean 48hrs+), fatigue is pretty much inevitable. For some women, the pain of labour is far beyond all imagining--even if nothing is wrong.

I am one of these women. As you know from my previous posts, my first labour was over 60 hours, 48 of which were excruciating back labour at home. There was no ability to sleep between contractions. My second labour was still 22 hrs and I DID stay home--to most women, 22 hrs is still impossible to imagine.

It is very easy for people to say they would not transfer if they have not had a long labour themselves. I have an extremely high pain tolerance and it still kicked my ass. I know you think I "am not worthy of the species" or whatever. I am just tiring of all your assumtions given you haven't even been pregnant yourself.
post #10 of 62
I have never labored before... but I feel really safe in saying that with this one, I will not transfer unless I *know* something is wrong.

I know what timetables they use in hospitals, and I know the common ones for midwives to use. But, I refuse to put a limit on how long I, personally, will labor before transfering.
I feel that if I start telling myself now, while I'm pregnant, that "I will transfer after __________ amount of time if _______ happens, and after _________ amount of time if __________ happens," then I am setting myself up for a much more stressful labor than need be.

I truly feel that I will know if something is wrong, and if it is, I will transfer. But, no time limits here. Shoot- I'm a first timer anyway- its supposed to take a while!
post #11 of 62
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post #12 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by arboriamoon View Post
I am just tiring of all your assumtions given you haven't even been pregnant yourself.
Ouch Terra! That's some tough sluggin'! :
post #13 of 62
[QUOTE=L J;6093257]I feel that if I start telling myself now, while I'm pregnant, that "I will transfer after __________ amount of time if _______ happens, and after _________ amount of time if __________ happens," then QUOTE]

I completely agree. If labour is progressive, WHY would anyone transfer? A friend of mine was in gentle labour for 10 days with her twins! I agree to plan a transfer after a certain amount of time passes would be really dumb. I don't think you'd find many UC transfers out there who will say "ah, well, I just got tired so I transferred". Most UC transfers are not without some basis. The journey to UC is treacherous and nobody planning a UC gives up their dream easily.
post #14 of 62
Watching the sun come up three times was a little challenging at times in my recent labour. Second babies do often come quicker but since my first labour was interupted I have no idea how long it would have lasted. I suspect a while I was very tired by the end which I think contributed to a PPH and I'm a little sad that I don't remember much of Isobel's first earthside hours as a result but birth just is what it is and she was naked on me naked and that's what I wanted. I never felt there was anything pathological about my labour, it was just long. She sat low for a lot of it and once my membranes ruptured I had 1 1/2 hours of transition and 30 mins of pushing so it was all over pretty quick compared with the rest. I had a few moments at the peak of monster cx when I'd think "epidurals aren't THAT bad" but I know they are LOL. Emotional support kept me going and I don't know what kept the team going, it wasn't my problem If my gut had told me we needed help, I'd have gone and got it which IMO is an appropriate use of technology - lifesaving not routine.
post #15 of 62
Thread Starter 
It seems like most transfers are not are real true emergency, and alot of them was because women became impatient. All the uc transfers I have read were not true emergency's.

one more question
If you felt there is something would you tune in to your body, and ask your body how do I deal with this without hospitals?

I believe your body will tell you, I have read stories that it can, and you and your baby will be alot better off because of it. So, instead of giving up and going to a hospital, look into your body for guidance. I believe since our bodies have been birthing without hospitals, so they know how to tell you how to do it without hospitals, so I think it is more of your neocotex brain saying go to the hospital, not what your body is truly saying.

There is going to be a small 5%of women who will need a hospital.
post #16 of 62
well, I have not had a HB yet.

I usually wait for 1 hour before getting everyone up and on our way.
But my labors are short. 5 hours to 2 hours.
post #17 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by freebirth2 View Post
I believe since our bodies have been birthing without hospitals, so they know how to tell you how to do it without hospitals, so I think it is more of your neocotex brain saying go to the hospital, not what your body is truly saying.
Do you also think this applies to breastfeeding? Afterall, it is breastfeeding that has kept our species going this long. Still there are many women who didn't feel it was instinctual and require breastfeeding support (I know of a woman who UC'ed her first that felt this way). Sometimes in this modern society the messages of our bodies is muted among all the white noise.
post #18 of 62
Quote:
All the uc transfers I have read were not true emergency's.
Here's one
post #19 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by freebirth2 View Post
It seems like most transfers are not are real true emergency, and alot of them was because women became impatient. All the uc transfers I have read were not true emergency's.
We just had a recent UC transfer posted here that involved pre-eclampsia. I guess you missed that? She listened to her body, noticed that something was incredibly wrong during her labor, and got help. She likely saved her own life and the life of her baby, by getting medication before seizures (eclampsia) started up. Frankly, I'd call that a true emergency, even if it didn't result in crash C-section. And please don't start up with "more protein in the diet" stuff... whether that works or not (and that's highly debateable), it doesn't help when you're in labor with pre-e. At that point, it's too late. And yes, pre-e can persist after the baby is born if mom isn't treated. A friend of mine was hospitalized with pre-e a week after her baby was born. She had pre-e at the time of birth, but no one had noticed the very obvious signs (mainly because she has very low bp normally, so they didn't pay attention to the very-high-for-her bp readings that were still under 140/90 .

If a woman chooses to transfer, then that's probably what's right for her in her situation. There's nothing wrong with transferring to a hospital. No, it's not fun or ideal, but sometimes it is necessary for that birth. And while you might be thinking they're just going to torture any woman that enters the hospital, most hospitals are actually not THAT bad. Believe me - I had to be in one, and it wasn't nearly as bad as I'd thought it would be after all the reading I'd done. I'd read the hospital horror stories mostly and was scared to death of hospitals, but my hospital (even with it's 90% epidural rate) was not a horror story at all. And I still got a drug-free vaginal birth. Could I have stayed home? Yes, and my baby might have died because he was very preterm. I made the choice that was right for us, and had a healthy baby because of that choice. I'm thankful I had a hospital available to me when I needed it. And I didn't have time to talk to my baby and ask him not to come early - my family has SHORT labors, and mine was 2.5 hours total. Do I plan to birth in a hospital again? Hopefully I won't have to. So far, I'm 2 weeks past when my DS decided to come, so I'm optimistic. But if I need it again, it's there, and I've got a good OB lined up and can have a wonderful birth.

If I were having a long labor, I wouldn't transfer just because it's long, but if my body said to transfer - ie, either something was wrong or I was just in sheer exhaustion, it doesn't matter how long it's been. I'd go if my body said to go. As a PP said, I wouldn't say "I'll transfer after ___ amount of hours". That's silly. But if you're having a long labor (and the definition of long for various women will differ, usually based on how hard that labor is), and you feel you need help, don't be afraid to get it. And if you look inside you and decide that you CAN do it at home, then do it at home. But the important thing to do is to listen to your body - whether it tells you to go to the hospital or stay at home.
post #20 of 62
I had a planned UC with my first child, but ended up going to the hospital of my own free will.

I had contractions about 7 to 8 minutes apart for four days straight. By the fourth night of this, I was exhausted and overwhelmed. I was progressing, just very SLLLLLOOOOOWWWWWLLLLLLYYYY. When I hit transition, I gave up and being overwhelmed by lack of sleep, frustration and fear, I asked my family to bring me to the hospital.

When I got there, within 30 minutes my son was born completely complication-free. I've since kicked myself many times---If ONLY I'd just waited it out a little longer.

But it is hard when you're in labor and tired not to give up. My contractions weren't even particularly painful, it was just the cummulative effect of little sleep and the mental exertion.

In retrospect, I know I had a lot of psychological issues that were holding back my labor. My first husband decided he didn't want to be a father after all while I was pregnant and dumped me. He had nothing to do with the baby and was not present at the birth. Feeling that loss and loneliness I'm sure contributed to my labor being so slow and long. I was still "waiting" for him to show up maybe?

I've heard stories of women (especially first-time mothers) who labor for days without any problems. I know I didn't have any problems at all, but I just got plain exhausted and overwhelmed. Wish I'd had just a *little* more patience....what a difference half an hour makes!
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