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post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by balawre View Post
Don't want to hijack here, but I don't have a pregnancy/birth story elsewhere...

It was far different from what I'd imagined our 2nd pregnancy would be and not as bad as I thought it would turn out.

We planned a hospital (vbac) birth with a very natural-friendly OB - he was okay with water labor, pushing however I wanted, etc and then we found out we were having twins at 10W. He was still very happy with a natural birth, but added that we'd have to deliver in the OR. I think I posted around that time asking how to avoid that and looking back that was such a tiny detail!

Around 3 months, we got the final declaration of monoamniotic twins and our care was transfered to the head of MFM at our University hospital. I felt fortunate that he was a pretty "crunchy" guy, his wife delivered at our birthing center and he even encouraged triplet moms to delivery vaginally. That said, he told me there was no way around a c-section again and that the twins would be delivered sometime between 32-34 weeks. He told us at our first appointment that if we made it to viability, he would see us again. I thought at the time it was terribly rude, but then we started reading all the studies and literature.

We made it to 26W, our choice of viability, and from there out started monitoring the girls at home for two sessions per day, each lasting from 1-2 hours. We chose not to do in-patient, like most mono pregnancies, because we are so close to the hospital and I felt like I needed to be at home for my sanity and for my toddler.

At 29W, I had contractions every 4-6 minutes apart and was admitted to the hospital for a week. I was dilating and had severe cervical funneling, so we chose mag sulfate and steroids. The funneling actually improved which is supposedly quite rare, and I went home on light bedrest, natural progesterone injections, and ibuprofen as a muscle relaxant.

We chose a 32W delivery because we saw what an emergency situation would be like during the PTL scare. I didn't want to deliver under general, and we hadn't experienced any heartrate decels the entire time we'd monitored the girls. The whole pregnancy was somewhat of a game of playing the odds, so we decided to play them again.

Meagan needed CPAP for 3 days then a cannula and Morgan was on a cannula for a couple of weeks. They were out of the NICU within two weeks and home after five long weeks. They took awhile to discharge because of apnea and brady spells.

They just turned 6 months old, breastfeed like champs, and they roll over, giggle, play with toys, try to sit up, and babble like nuts. I wouldn't want to have the experience again, but it was certainly worth it to have my two sweet girls.

Wow - what a journey. How about the cord issues that they talk to you about with twins growing without a membrane to separate them. When they were looking for my boys membrane - they basically told us that if it is not found we would be strongly counseled to "reduce" (I hate that word) the boys as they would not survive and this would give me girl a fighting chance.
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TripMom View Post
Wow - what a journey. How about the cord issues that they talk to you about with twins growing without a membrane to separate them. When they were looking for my boys membrane - they basically told us that if it is not found we would be strongly counseled to "reduce" (I hate that word) the boys as they would not survive and this would give me girl a fighting chance.
Older studies do show a 50-70% rate of infant death, but some of the latest point to a very high survival rate (99%) with in-patient monitoring, twice per day. Supposedly it's the standard of care, or should be, for monoamniotic pregnancies now. Some practices are more lax about monitoring, but even more that I've read about are asking patients to commit to 24/7 monitoring from viability onward.

Our doctor was of the thought, as were we, that we would see decels leading up to a cod accident. We didn't think the risk of a sudden, instant accident outweighed the mental and physical toll that extended bedrest, hospital stay, and separation from family would take on me.

When the girls were delivered, their cords were indeed knotted together and very tangled. I can see how active babies, especially when tiny enough to move about or large enough to tug and pull, could easily have cord accidents.

We were not ever given the suggestion to terminate, but were warned not to have high expectations for the pregnancy.

On the monoamniotic.org forums, there are some triplet mamas that delivered a monoamniotic set. No one was going through it during my pregnancy, so I'm not real familiar with the odds or their stories. That would be such a tough choice though!

If you aren't squeamish, we took images of the tangles and knots. It's pretty amazing! I'm not a big one for miracles, but it's pretty impressive to know that they were both okay even with such odds.
http://static.flickr.com/43/12289988...21e5d4.jpg?v=0
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by balawre View Post
Older studies do show a 50-70% rate of infant death, but some of the latest point to a very high survival rate (99%) with in-patient monitoring, twice per day. Supposedly it's the standard of care, or should be, for monoamniotic pregnancies now. Some practices are more lax about monitoring, but even more that I've read about are asking patients to commit to 24/7 monitoring from viability onward.

Our doctor was of the thought, as were we, that we would see decels leading up to a cod accident. We didn't think the risk of a sudden, instant accident outweighed the mental and physical toll that extended bedrest, hospital stay, and separation from family would take on me.

When the girls were delivered, their cords were indeed knotted together and very tangled. I can see how active babies, especially when tiny enough to move about or large enough to tug and pull, could easily have cord accidents.

We were not ever given the suggestion to terminate, but were warned not to have high expectations for the pregnancy.

On the monoamniotic.org forums, there are some triplet mamas that delivered a monoamniotic set. No one was going through it during my pregnancy, so I'm not real familiar with the odds or their stories. That would be such a tough choice though!

If you aren't squeamish, we took images of the tangles and knots. It's pretty amazing! I'm not a big one for miracles, but it's pretty impressive to know that they were both okay even with such odds.
http://static.flickr.com/43/12289988...21e5d4.jpg?v=0

Wow - your story is amazing - and thanks for sharing the photos. I am going to try and keep track of this thread as triplet moms in my local triplet mothers group periodically have this issue come up - would be nice for them to see some success stories. I sure wasn't given any? And my doc was not particularly overly conservative? I am really shocked by his advice in retrospect given this info - he told us reduction of both id twins would be the only way to go?
post #24 of 32
Very interesting -- I don't know any mamas irl who have mono/mono twins. You are a very lucky mama!

Mine had Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome so based on that, I knew they shared a placenta and were MZ. They were "monochorionic diamniotic" as the docs said all the time.

Also, I was a single mom of twins, and when I met my now-dh and we started the adoption process, we had to take them for a DNA test to prove that their sperm donor was, in fact, their sperm donor. :
post #25 of 32
We had to do genetic testing and found out that our girls are identical. We were kind of surprised even though they have the same birthmarks, cowlicks, and dimples. LOL We never would have known for sure if we hadn't done the test.
post #26 of 32
I am pretty sure my twins are fraternal, (they look NOTHING alike), but they have the same blood type so we don't know for sure.
post #27 of 32
I know mine are frat...they are boy/girl : Seriously though, I haven't read all the posts but the only wayto know for sure is if they shared a sac or if you have the test done.
post #28 of 32
Oops, wrong place. :doh:
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by balawre View Post
Don't want to hijack here, but I don't have a pregnancy/birth story elsewhere...

It was far different from what I'd imagined our 2nd pregnancy would be and not as bad as I thought it would turn out.

We planned a hospital (vbac) birth with a very natural-friendly OB - he was okay with water labor, pushing however I wanted, etc and then we found out we were having twins at 10W. He was still very happy with a natural birth, but added that we'd have to deliver in the OR. I think I posted around that time asking how to avoid that and looking back that was such a tiny detail!

Around 3 months, we got the final declaration of monoamniotic twins and our care was transfered to the head of MFM at our University hospital. I felt fortunate that he was a pretty "crunchy" guy, his wife delivered at our birthing center and he even encouraged triplet moms to delivery vaginally. That said, he told me there was no way around a c-section again and that the twins would be delivered sometime between 32-34 weeks. He told us at our first appointment that if we made it to viability, he would see us again. I thought at the time it was terribly rude, but then we started reading all the studies and literature.

We made it to 26W, our choice of viability, and from there out started monitoring the girls at home for two sessions per day, each lasting from 1-2 hours. We chose not to do in-patient, like most mono pregnancies, because we are so close to the hospital and I felt like I needed to be at home for my sanity and for my toddler.

At 29W, I had contractions every 4-6 minutes apart and was admitted to the hospital for a week. I was dilating and had severe cervical funneling, so we chose mag sulfate and steroids. The funneling actually improved which is supposedly quite rare, and I went home on light bedrest, natural progesterone injections, and ibuprofen as a muscle relaxant.

We chose a 32W delivery because we saw what an emergency situation would be like during the PTL scare. I didn't want to deliver under general, and we hadn't experienced any heartrate decels the entire time we'd monitored the girls. The whole pregnancy was somewhat of a game of playing the odds, so we decided to play them again.

Meagan needed CPAP for 3 days then a cannula and Morgan was on a cannula for a couple of weeks. They were out of the NICU within two weeks and home after five long weeks. They took awhile to discharge because of apnea and brady spells.

They just turned 6 months old, breastfeed like champs, and they roll over, giggle, play with toys, try to sit up, and babble like nuts. I wouldn't want to have the experience again, but it was certainly worth it to have my two sweet girls.
Wow what a story, glad everyone's healthy. My neighbor also had mono-mono twins and she was told it wouldn't be a viable pregnancy, then after that she was told that the babies heads were fused together until one during one of her ultrasounds she coughed and the heads separated. She got a c-section, her girls had some apnea and acid reflux (so did mine) they are 6yrs old now and very healthy. To go through all that was not fun.
post #30 of 32
We have identicals, mo/mo's. We had always hoped a dividing membrane would show up one one of the early ultrasounds but it never did! We developed twin-to-twin transfusion at 20 weeks. To make a long story short we had placental laser surgery in Florida at 23 weeks and were lucky to deliver both babies at 30 weeks! We had no choice. They were in the NICU for 56 very scary days. They both had PDA surgeries (heart valve) but are totally healthy and on schedule now thankfully for babies born at term. One baby is still a little heavier than his brother and has a strawberry on his forehead, so strangers always tell us "how can they be identical" LOL I don't explain to everyone, I try to stop rolling my eyes when strangers in the mall ask how they can be identical if one baby is slightly larger and has a birthmark. LOL
post #31 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2QTs View Post
We have identicals, mo/mo's. We had always hoped a dividing membrane would show up one one of the early ultrasounds but it never did! We developed twin-to-twin transfusion at 20 weeks. To make a long story short we had placental laser surgery in Florida at 23 weeks and were lucky to deliver both babies at 30 weeks! We had no choice. They were in the NICU for 56 very scary days. They both had PDA surgeries (heart valve) but are totally healthy and on schedule now thankfully for babies born at term. One baby is still a little heavier than his brother and has a strawberry on his forehead, so strangers always tell us "how can they be identical" LOL I don't explain to everyone, I try to stop rolling my eyes when strangers in the mall ask how they can be identical if one baby is slightly larger and has a birthmark. LOL
Thank God your babies are okay, that must of been scary. Funny, people ask me if mine are identical and I say Yes and they say, but one is looks bigger then the other? I say Yess she is.
post #32 of 32
I have nine week old identical twin girls.

Twin A was 7-7 and her name is Alaina. Twin B was 8 lbs and her name is Patience. My husband named Alaina, I named Patience after a childless family friend.

They were monochorionic diamniotic, the most common presentation for identical twins. Curiously, they're what's called "mirror" twins: their difference in size and Alaina's mildly cruddy eye are their only differences. Well, Alaina's called "Squeaky" for a reason and Patience's name seems to be remarkably suitable, but that doesn't help strangers tell them apart.

I had severe edema with the pregnancy (70 lbs worth) and also developed pneumonia afterwards. It bit the big one.

By the way - hello. Dunno where else to introduce me, but I'm Misty, and I have two other daughters and twins as well. Kyrie died of complications from Down's syndrome before her birth, but Adia is cheerfully snapping pencil lead out of the pencil over by the changing table where she thinks I can't see.
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