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When does one call the police on carseat issues? - Page 5

post #81 of 104
I called the police a few weeks ago about an unrestrained child. I gave them the make, model, and license plate # of the car and in what direction it was headed. They sent an officer out to talk to me, and he said he'd go pay them a visit to talk about carseat requirements.

The officer wasn't really well-educated about carseat safety guidelines and said that they only have to be in a harnessed carseat until 4 years/40lbs (which is sadly the extent of the law), but hopefully the kid is still small enough to fall under that law and/or her mother gets an education about carseats and boosters.

I would not hesitate to call the police over a carseat issue. I don't believe child protective services would get involved over one complaint, and even if they do, it's still better than a potentially deadly car accident.
post #82 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blu Razzberri View Post
If they don't like the laws, the can move back home!

Look, I know that sounds harsh to immigrants, and that's not my intention at all. But you can bend cultural rules (dress your kid in traditional clothes from your country) but you CANNOT break safety rules. If you're not used to it - GET USED TO IT. I just think it would be incredibly irresponsable NOT to call the police if you saw that. My S/O always says "you can't change the world honey"; but you know what? It's me changing the world one child at a time, and if there were more of 'me'; this world would be a much safer place!

: This post is making me sick...especially since I know there's someone who's going to shake their head at what I just said and rip me apart for it...I just wish I could put all children in a bubble![/B]
I think maybe you are getting pretty emotional about this topic and it is clouding your ability to see things from another person's point of view.

of course the U.S. has all kinds of laws and norms that are different from other countries. That really is not the point.

The point is cultural conditioning. Here in the U.S. right now carseats are all the rage. They are discussed a lot and it is seen as very black and white by most people.

If you come from a country where that is simply not emphasized and doesn't have the same kind of education, you would come to the U.S. and initially not even realize it's an issue. Then when you realized it was an issue, you would shake your head and say "Man.. those Americans! Back home nobody ever did that kind of thing".

After a while you would probably get more information and become educated. But until that time you would probably be careless about it.


We do many dangerous things here that would appall people in other countries. Using a hospital for birthing would be seen as really stupid to some people; if an American went to another country where homebirthing was really popular, do you think they would automatically homebirth? Or push more for a hospital birth? What about using pain drugs at childbirth? That's very much a part of the culture here, despite being dangerous and having way too many unknowns.

I think instead of ranting and raving about how stupid people are and what horrible parents they are, maybe if we genuinely try to see things from another person's point of view it might be more helpful in the long run. Since we all share the same planet and stuff.
post #83 of 104
P.S. I just wanted to mention that this is why interacting and sharing more with other countries and cultures is so valuable. In American right now we have reasonably good awareness of car seats. We are intensely dense on some other topics, though. By sharing and learning about what other cultures value, you can really question why things are the way they are and make better decisions about parenting and life in general, I think.
post #84 of 104
I almost called the police on a mother today and decided against it...it was a mama (I assume) and another woman. Both younger, early to mid-twenties. They had an approx 18-24 month old baby boy...in a belt poss booster...with just a lap belt, the sholder belt they put behind the car seat because he was still too short. I saw the whole thing because they were parked next to me. Thinking about it now I wish I had called the cops on them...
post #85 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by KristiMetz View Post
P.S. I just wanted to mention that this is why interacting and sharing more with other countries and cultures is so valuable. In American right now we have reasonably good awareness of car seats. We are intensely dense on some other topics, though. By sharing and learning about what other cultures value, you can really question why things are the way they are and make better decisions about parenting and life in general, I think.
This is so true! I've learned so much about other cultures and really have found that there is a lot we can all learn from one another. I do know that here in Japan carseats are not the norm or the law, but then again, the highest speed limit is about 70km (maybe 50 mph). If a person is caught going over that the fine is at least $700-$800.00 and if a person is going 30kph over that they go to jail. People here don't drink and drive. If you drink and drive (limit is .01--1 drink) you go to jail. It seems the only people who tend to break this law are the Americans because the Japanese just don't do it. People here also drive way more carefully since there is never just one person at fault in an accident and people here really have more of a sense of not harming others in any way. It's pretty cool actually!
post #86 of 104

It's Just the Laws of Physics

Homebirth I'm postive is statistically safer.
Vaccinations-there's research on both sides.
Car Accidents as someone has posted are the number one cause of death of small children.
An unrestrained child is in serious danger.

How many times do we drive per day or week.

I drive my kids through several dangerous intersections at least twice a day (to and from school) and often more than that (if we go to the park or store FE).

These are streets in residential neighborhoods but it doesn't matter. I see people driving 40-50 miles per hour. They drive 30-40 mph in the alleys behind the houses.

We live near a college campus. Most students live off campus and hundreds drive to class, work etc.

This is not even mentioning the people driving in town.

The risk is much greater than a bad outcome for a homebirth or a vaccine reaction.

I just hate to see preventable deaths happen. A couple of years ago there were two. A 3 yo not in a booster and a 2 yo in a seatbelt. Minor accidents in both cases and all the belted adults were fine but the kids were two small for the belts and they were ejected from their seats.

Our local health dept. rents car seats for 10 dollars. I would have paid the 10 dollars gladly to keep those kids alive.
post #87 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by annab View Post
If you see a person driving down the road with kids in the car who are young enough to be restrained, but aren't, do you call the police?

I have seen this several times in the last few weeks, and my first instinct is to act in the name of safety and call the cops. But I hate to be the crazy lady always calling the police when I see someone not using carseats.

Thoughts?

I call everytime I see this and try to get the license plate or at least a description of the car and the current location.

I have even called the police on my coworkers (and they know it and we are good friends).

They now use carseats around me, but by the action of their children I know they don't use them any other time. The kids ask WHY they have to get in a carseat : and they don't put it on automatically.

For them it's a control thing. They think I just want to be controlling. I don't think they realize their children not wearing a seatbelt might affect me if I am driving on the road with them (unbuckled children can be a distraction to the driver whose full attention should be on the road and conditions around her/him). What if a child bumped the driver and caused the driver to swerve and hit me?

Oy, don't get me started.
post #88 of 104
It's interesting to me that there are so many mamas on here who see lots and lots of unrestrained kids. Where I live, I've maybe seen one EVER. What I do see (and which drives me crazy but probably doesn't rise to the level of calling the police) is kids who aren't strapped in tightly enough. Those straps are supposed to be a whole lot tighter than a lot of people make them. What area of the country do some of you live in who see lots of unrestrained kids?
post #89 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainyday View Post
It's interesting to me that there are so many mamas on here who see lots and lots of unrestrained kids. Where I live, I've maybe seen one EVER. What I do see (and which drives me crazy but probably doesn't rise to the level of calling the police) is kids who aren't strapped in tightly enough. Those straps are supposed to be a whole lot tighter than a lot of people make them. What area of the country do some of you live in who see lots of unrestrained kids?
I'm in Fairfield County CT. I don't think I've actually ever seen an unrestrained child. However, the police around here are crazy about it. That and seatbelts. I have friends that have been ticketed for not wearing seatbelts. I think the police around here are pretty bored and are looking for people to pull over for something to do. People are pretty careful around here because of it.
post #90 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainyday View Post
It's interesting to me that there are so many mamas on here who see lots and lots of unrestrained kids. Where I live, I've maybe seen one EVER. What I do see (and which drives me crazy but probably doesn't rise to the level of calling the police) is kids who aren't strapped in tightly enough. Those straps are supposed to be a whole lot tighter than a lot of people make them. What area of the country do some of you live in who see lots of unrestrained kids?

I live in Rockingham, NC and see it all the time, several times a week. I see them at the bank, fast food restaurents, driving from grocery store parking lots, driving by me in the car. Not loose belts, but children be-bopping around the backseats. Just this evening a friend and I went to her bank to deposit her check through the drive-thru window. Right next to us was a co0worker. Her 4 year old was bouncing around in the backseat. She and I have had it out before about the carseat issue and she wouldn't even look at me this evening.:
post #91 of 104
I guess I've seen it when visiting relatives in other parts of the country. I know that in Oklahoma I saw three young children just bopping around the back of a pickup truck, and I was shocked. I just do not understand why people who know better (like Potty Diva's coworker) let their kids ride that way.
post #92 of 104
I live in south central Indiana and see unrestrained children quite often. Today I saw a 2-3yo child sitting in a regular seatbelt.

Several weeks ago my friend saw a child strapped into one of these in a car.
post #93 of 104
Uh, Michelle...

It DOES have a 3 point restraint system, duh.
post #94 of 104
Just playing a bit of devil's advocate here.

Even though I am truly horrified when I see children unrestrained or improperly restrained I have to wonder where the line should be drawn at.

I know that this isn't the best comparison... but it shows the slippery slope...

It has been shown over and over again that carseats are safer than not being restrained. It is generally accepted by american society that this is best.
(I have first hand experience...DS would have died too if he had not been properly restrained.)

American society also generally accepts what is fed to them about vaccinations and western medicine. CPS/Police are called far too often because some of us don't accept.
(and yes I have first hand experience on this as well)

I guess I am having a hard time making my exact point.
Why is okay for one and not the other? What perspective are we truly looking at this issue from? Are we being just as discriminative as those we claim to discriminate because we don't follow the mainstream and accepted society.

Car seats protect children and we all want all children to be protected. But some argue that vaccinations protect children and want all children to be protected.

Am I making any sense?

Nina
post #95 of 104
I live in a small town in south central Iowa, it's TERRIBLE here. I've called the police on unrestrained kids probably 10 times, just since DS was born.
post #96 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by busybusymomma View Post
I live in south central Indiana and see unrestrained children quite often. Today I saw a 2-3yo child sitting in a regular seatbelt.

Several weeks ago my friend saw a child strapped into one of these in a car.
I feel really bad for those parents. It is not surprising to me. I truly believe that someone, somewhere at sometime suggested that their 2-3 year old go into a booster seat, and this is what they thought it meant. I have seen MUCH MUCH worse. Oh, I am sad. : Now I won't be able to get them out of my head. :

DC
post #97 of 104
I would call without a question. I nearly lost my mom and little sister in a car crash. I have lost an uncle and several friends to car crashes. This is not a debate about parenting philosophy or choices. Car crashes kill people, they kill children. They are the leading cause of death for children and adults ages 1 to 34. This is a very serious issue. I find it truly hard to believe that CPS is interested in hunting down parents who get a car seat violation and taking their children. I don't think it is more than a ticket (if that) in any state. These threads are suprising to me... I find it hard to defend not putting your child in a car seat.
post #98 of 104
I think the difference between carseats and vaccines is that (to the best of my knowledge), no child has ever died from simply being strapped in a carseat. The same cannot be said about vaccines - and I do have firsthand knowledge of that unfortunately.

That said, I don't see children freely roaming around the backseat, in fact I saw it once and was so shocked by the time I got over the shock enough to think about talking to the parents, the car was gone. If I saw a child of any age in the back of a pickup, I would call the cops. -I saw a dog perched on top of metal doors in the back of a pickup once and I got out at the light and yelled at the driver. If I saw a child unrestrained in the back of a car, I would just say something to the parents.
post #99 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by aslmere View Post
Car seats protect children and we all want all children to be protected. But some argue that vaccinations protect children and want all children to be protected.

Am I making any sense?

Nina
You're making sense to me. I hear you Nina.
post #100 of 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by busybusymomma View Post
I live in south central Indiana and see unrestrained children quite often. Today I saw a 2-3yo child sitting in a regular seatbelt.

Several weeks ago my friend saw a child strapped into one of these in a car.
My dad put me in one of those when I was little, because he didn't understand the "booster seat" thing.
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