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Silly question about C/S hospital bag... - Page 2

post #21 of 61
I brought a package of Hanes Her Way cotton undies in one size larger than my prepregnancy size (the BEST for postpartum!), two thick fuzzy men's sweatsuits in my normal size (cause they are pretty stretchy) and a few pairs of warm socks (I had my baby in January 2004 and it was COLD that month!). I wasn't planning on having a C/S but everything I brought worked out perfectly! The sweatsuit allowed me to move freely without worrying about exposing by bits and pieces and the waistband was stretchy enough that the nurses were able to check my incision with no problem! It made me feel so much more normal to be in my own clothes - wearing a hospital gown made me feel too much like a patient!
post #22 of 61
Thread Starter 
Thank you all so much!! Wonderful, wonderful advice - I truly appreciate it. I'm still hoping he turns so that I can go ahead with the unmedicated birth I'd hoped for, but if he doesn't, it's great to have so much helpful info to go into a C/S with. Hubby and I are making 2 birth plans - one for a C/S and one for a VB.

Your posts gave me some great things to think about - great b/c I'd much rather think about them now then once I'm in hospital. The visitors vs. no visitors one is a good example - I'm no good with hospitals, so I will definitely want visitors(!), and thinking about this now is great b/c I can be sure to tell everyone that I WANT them to come see me, even if I am recovering from a C/S.

Will wait till we know which we're doing, but I'm starting a list of things I may need...granny underwear will be at the top!
Again, thank you all so much, straight from my heart. Your wisdom is so appreciated!!
post #23 of 61
I am in the hospital right now recovering from my C-section the 12th.

After day one, and I had my IV and catheter out, I've been in regular clothes. To me it makes me feel SO much better. I don't have any trouble with excessive bleeding, but that can vary. My bleeding now 2 days out is about like that of a regular period. Also, my baby is in the NICU, so I need to get out of the room and walk around a lot, so having normal clothes was important to me.

I use the mesh panties from the hospital.

I tell my nurse to bring me my pain meds at night at the scheduled times. That way I don't sleep through a dose.

I bring my own toiletries because my hospital only provides toothpaste and a bar of soap.

I bring two pillows from home for me DH has one for him too.
post #24 of 61
Beth I congratulated you on another thread, but wanted to say it here too. I am so happy for you and your family! What a blessing. I am sure Amy will be out of the NICU soon and you will all be home, as a family.
post #25 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheFence View Post
If you have a surgical birth or a complicated vaginal birth I dont think it is a good idea to be left alone. If you are left alone, some nurse could slip you drugs in your IV (like my aunt), intimidate you while you are tired, refuse to bring the baby to you if you are bound to bed due to surgery, and the list goes on. You should always have a strong advocate there for yourself if at all possible, one that is rejuvinated and can manage to let you rest and help you use your voice.

Kim
God forbid. Not some NURSE!

I am SO tired of the eternal assumption that the nurses in the hospital are there solely to sabotage birth plans, make breastfeeding difficult, cause pain, yada yada yada. Guess what? I just spent three days sitting on a very uncomfortable chair, 39+ weeks pregnant, to attend a conference in order to update my knowledge of lactation research -- you know, so I could BETTER support breastfeeding. Nurses are not the enemy here. There are systems in place that make it very difficult for nurses to practice our profession rather than protect hospitals from litigation. That's different.

I absolutely disagree with tight/synthetic panties over an incision. As a PP noted, air flow is extremely important to healing, because it keeps the area from becoming damp (sweat, serosanguinous discharge, any bleeding) and then macerated, which will delay healing and promote infection. Incisions need air. Wound healing research has repeatedly validated this.

I strongly suggest considering scheduling your meds through the night, so you don't wake up in pain. Also, request duramorph in your spinal or epidural -- good long-lasting pain control. And WALK! It will feel hideous. You need to do it. Really.
post #26 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmama View Post
I am SO tired of the eternal assumption that the nurses in the hospital are there solely to sabotage birth plans, make breastfeeding difficult, cause pain, yada yada yada. Guess what? I just spent three days sitting on a very uncomfortable chair, 39+ weeks pregnant, to attend a conference in order to update my knowledge of lactation research -- you know, so I could BETTER support breastfeeding. Nurses are not the enemy here. There are systems in place that make it very difficult for nurses to practice our profession rather than protect hospitals from litigation. That's different.
Nurses may not be the enemy, but the biggest favour they could do me while in hospital is go away. They don't listen to anything I say, and they drive me nuts. I hate having people hanging around and trying to "help" when I've already told them that I don't want or need their assistance (like the nurse who shoved a pillow under ds2 while he was nursing, causing him to break and re-latch badly when he had a perfect latch before-hand).

Quote:
I strongly suggest considering scheduling your meds through the night, so you don't wake up in pain. Also, request duramorph in your spinal or epidural -- good long-lasting pain control. And WALK! It will feel hideous. You need to do it. Really.
Think twice about duramorph. I hate that stuff. I'd rather be in a thousand times worse pain that itch like that. Unfortunately, with my third incision, the anesthetist put it in my IV without telling me - I'd told my OB that I didn't want it, but I expected to be told before it was administered (my previous anesthetist had warned me, but I didn't know at that time that it made me itch). I also don't like a lot of pain control - that's how I ended up twisting a staple last time, which resulted in poor healing and an infection.
post #27 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
Think twice about duramorph. I hate that stuff. I'd rather be in a thousand times worse pain that itch like that. Unfortunately, with my third incision, the anesthetist put it in my IV without telling me - I'd told my OB that I didn't want it, but I expected to be told before it was administered (my previous anesthetist had warned me, but I didn't know at that time that it made me itch). I also don't like a lot of pain control - that's how I ended up twisting a staple last time, which resulted in poor healing and an infection.
Duramorph doesn't go in the IV. That's part of the point.
post #28 of 61
Stuff that's good for any hospital birth:

-socks
-comfy pillows
-loose pants or skirt to go home in
- your own soap/shampoo/toothpaste, the hospital stuff sucks
-underwear that you don't mind ruining if you don't like the mesh hospital panties, one size bigger than your pre-pregnancy size.
- your own pads, either cloth or disposable, once again, the hospital ones suck.

Specifically for a c/s:
-make those underwear granny panties. You don't want bikinis rubbing on your incision site!
-a Boppy or something similar. Makes just even holding the baby much easier
-if you want your own pjs, go with a gown, or something with a very loose waistband. (though personally, I prefer the hospital gowns. Easy to get in and out of, and I don't have to wash it when I go home! )
-something to read or work on-- crosswords, easy knitting, whatever, since you're likely to be there longer than with a vaginal birth and you probably will get bored at some point.

And I'm in total agreement with getting up to walk ASAP. It will not feel good at all in the moment, but definitely helps with recovery! Even if you just get up and walk over to a chair, sit down for a few minutes, then walk back to bed. Or walk to the bathroom. And take the pain meds (insist on ones that are safe for bf)! You don't want to be totally zonked out, but stressing over how much pain you are in isn't good for your recovery either.
post #29 of 61
My sister is a nurse, she is a former L&D nurse. I often have her with me for my hospital stays because she readily admits that if a doctor writes on a patients form that they can have XYZ, that the nurses will do it so they will have compliant patients and they will sleep at night so not to be bothered. So if you have an IV, and fall asleep and they see you are able to get X med, they can go and put in your IV without you even saying yay or nay -- because it was ordered. I can't count the number of times a nurse has brought me the wrong medication or tried to dose me based on something written on my chart. I have the right to deny or accept VERBALLY any medication on there.
I have been treated badly by nursing staff. With Katie I had a nurse try to intimidate me and tried to take my baby to the nursery without my consent for a sugar test. Finally my sister stoof up for me, indicated that she too was a nurse and that I was within my legal rights not to have the test performed on my child. (Because my babies have to have blood draws, I requested that if a sugar test needed to be done it could wait until the next draw, they just were not going to randomly stick my kid for blood) This so called "nice nurse" never came and checked on me or my baby again for the rest of the night, even though I had been having problems with my anest. from my SURGICAL birth. My sister was the one who checked my foley, emptied it, changed the pads on my bed, and even checked my blood pressure.
I love nurses! But they are trained to go with the grain of the hospital and follow the proceedures. The status quo so to speak.
post #30 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmama View Post
Duramorph doesn't go in the IV. That's part of the point.
I actually knew that, but I forgot. I certainly couldn't tell at the time, because I didn't even know he'd put it in. So - he put it in my spinal without telling me - it doesn't really matter whether it went through my bloodstream or my spine.
post #31 of 61
Maxmama- if you're a nurse, you certainly there are good nurses and bad nurses. It sounds like you're one of the good ones. When I was in the hospital for all of my kids (only my 3rd was csection) I had some EXCELLENT nurses and some horrible ones. The nurses can make or break the experience for you. I had some nurses that couldn't give a rats a$$ if I was able to breastfeed and i had some that were as good as the IBCLC.

To the OP, I agree about the granny panties. I couldn't wear my bikinis until way after the birth. I just wore the gown when I was there so I could remember I was recovering from surgery as well as birth. I had maternity pants, like sweat pants, I wore home. I didn't plan anything different b/c my csection wasn't planned.

After I got home, I did sleep semi reclined on the couch for about 2-3 weeks b/c I couldn't get up from being in bed. Try not to watch anything too funny, either. The day I got home, I saw the funniest episode of Malcom in the Middle and laughed so hard, I caused myself pain and started to cry it hurt so much. Not good. I tried to not laugh too hard, but I did anyway.
post #32 of 61
i had to comment on the "nurse" thing too. i am also a nurse, and some of these posts start to get to me. i completely understand that there are some nurses out there who maybe shouldn't be nurses. but sometimes things that are posted lump all nurses together like we're all evil or something. i did not become a nurse to torture people and secretly "slip drugs" into someone's iv.

i work postpartum right now, and i completely respect my mamas and babies (and families). i don't try to separate moms and babies, or drug moms, or intimidate anyone. i provide gentle care, and i always respect their space.

not only am i a postpartum nurse (soon to be doing labor and delivery also), but i am also a homebirth mama who didn't circumsize her son, or vaccinate. i am still breastfeeding my 2 year old, i cosleep and i babywear. and i've also been a doula and a midwifery student. you can't just assume all nurses are horrible. my favorite mamas to take care of in the hospital are the ones who transfer in from out of hospital births, i can very much relate to them and feel that i can still provide some "midwifery" care in a gentle way.

so, off my ranting.

i definitely agree with the comment about a blanket, i'd also recommend bringing your own pillow, it can make it feel more like your own space. i also like the idea of making a little sign to stick in babies bassinet or somewhere politely mentioning that baby is breastfed and not to receive anything other than mama's milk without your permission (pacifiers included). i've not yet seen moms do this where i work, but i know that if i were to deliver in a hospital i would make sure staff knew. i feel that sometimes people will give a baby a pacifier without even thinking about it or realizing- and if you're okay with that then that's one thing, but if not, then you want people to be aware.
post #33 of 61
I just want to say that nurses probably treat people the way they are treated, like almost everyone else in the world. If you walk in suspicious and defensive I would be less likely to even want to help you, let alone make sure all your wishes are followed. TG most nurses are professional and see past that. Not all are great, not all are terrible, but for the most part they are overworked, underpaid, unrespected and deserve better.

< I'm not a nurse, BTW. And I have been blessed with wonderful nurses. So I may be biased. I have also heard horror stories, but it doesn't hurt to give someone a chance.
post #34 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
I actually knew that, but I forgot. I certainly couldn't tell at the time, because I didn't even know he'd put it in. So - he put it in my spinal without telling me - it doesn't really matter whether it went through my bloodstream or my spine.
Well, it does matter. The systemic effects for most people are much lower with spinal or epidural narcotics than IV narcotics, and many people would require much higher doses of IV narcotics to get the same pain control that they do with epidural/intrathecal morphine. Higher dose=more side effects, for most people. I'm sorry you have itching with duramorph, but the amount of IV morphine needed to give the same pain relief would be much higher and the itching likely to be that much more intense if given IV.
post #35 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmama View Post
Well, it does matter. The systemic effects for most people are much lower with spinal or epidural narcotics than IV narcotics, and many people would require much higher doses of IV narcotics to get the same pain control that they do with epidural/intrathecal morphine. Higher dose=more side effects, for most people. I'm sorry you have itching with duramorph, but the amount of IV morphine needed to give the same pain relief would be much higher and the itching likely to be that much more intense if given IV.
Okay - I didn't know that. But, I don't want the duramorph at all. I personally find pain easier to cope with than itching. I'd take the pain from my first section (no duramorph) over the combination of pain and itching from my last two any day of the week.


Since there's been another post about, I just want to clarify something about my feelings about nurses. I think most of my nurses have been of the "good" variety. They try to help, etc. However, one important aspect is overlooked. I don't want "help".. I want to be left alone. Come and take my blood pressure and temperature, then leave me alone. And, if a nurse is trying to help, I want them to listen. I think I mentioned the nurse who jammed a pillow under my arm - I'd already told her I was fine, and didn't need any pillows. So, she moved me from a reasonably comfortable breastfeeding position to a tremendously uncomfortable position...out of what seemed to be a sincere desire to help.
post #36 of 61
Whatever they put into my spinal (duramorph, I think) made me puke as it started wearing off. Then the pain relief started wearing off, so I could feel my incision as I was puking- very, very painful. They couldn't give me anything by mouth, so I got a shot of something (they didn't put it in the IV)- I think it was phenergen (?). Helped me stop puking, but I was knocked out- hard. I remember doc coming in to talk to me, but not sure about what was in the conversation. Not pleasant at all. The itching was HORRIBLE as well.

Once that wore off, I just had ibuprofin/percocet alternating for pain, no drowsiness that way.
post #37 of 61
Surgery by itself will make some people vomit. Phenergan is one of the most useless post-op drugs for nausea because of the sedation. Zofran or anzemet should be given prophylactically in the OR IMO; they're often not because they're expensive.
post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxmama View Post
Surgery by itself will make some people vomit. Phenergan is one of the most useless post-op drugs for nausea because of the sedation. Zofran or anzemet should be given prophylactically in the OR IMO; they're often not because they're expensive.
You can refuse phenergran and request only Zofran to be administered. I have the last two times, and will again. I didn't have to have them thank goodness. I think it is key, if you are able to talk to the anest. beforehand!
post #39 of 61
I spent a long time talking to the anesth ahead of time this time. I explained that it was VERY important to me to remain as alert and clearheaded as possible at all times throughout the surgery. She was great at accommodating my wishes. At one point I felt a little nauseated and she gave me Zofran and something else for my blood pressure and that seemed to help. But otherwise I loved that I felt totally in control and alert during and after the surgery.

I also had a doula with me who came into the OR after my Dh had to leave. That way I had someone with me the entire time that I was in the OR and in recovery while DH was free to go with our daughter to the NICU. (We knew she would go there ahead of time since she was born at 34 weeks.)

I also talked to the anesth about morphine since it made me very itchy last time as well. She gave me two options: 1) have no duramorph at all and opt for a PCA with a different narcotic instead or 2) use a lower than normal dose of the morpheine to see if that helped. I went with option 2 and kind of regretted it. I still itched and didn't get terrific pain relief. But this time they gave me Nubain for the itching which helped quite a bit. After 2 doses of that I was fine. They gave me oral percocet too since I was not getting the best pain relief from the morpheine, but the next day after the morphine wore off I realized it *had* been helping alot, I just hadn't realized it.

I really think its key to dialogue with the anest ahead of time about your wishes. I have also had nothing but fabulous nurses this time, although I think that having a big flag in your chart that your baby is in the NICU and that your previous baby died generally makes people nicer to you than usual.
post #40 of 61
I'm sorry for everyone's bad experiences...

When I had my c-section, they DID leave me alone. So much so that I thought I had offended all the nurses. I was alone with the baby the first night post-op (had my section at 10:30 pm, my dh had to go home to let the dog out as my relatives were acting useless, nad he was exhausted so he stayed there). One nurse came in ONE time to change a diaper. They came in to do vital signs and change out my IV fluid bags. Around 6 am, she emptied my foley. Otherwise, I was alone. THen, the next day they took vitals, brought in food, brought in drugs, and that's about it. Oh, and a tech came in and said "yep, that's a big mess" after I got up the first time, and she called housekeeping.

We went home right after lunch the 2nd day, but I think I had a pretty good experience. I'm still not sure about the postpartum nurses--maybe I did offend them? Maybe that's par for the course? Who knows...
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