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raising a vaccine free child?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
what do you guys think of this book. i was really surprised how she believes you can catch a chill. is that true?
post #2 of 24
I am not an educated anti-vax mama; I am a mama who is not vaxing while I am in the process of getting educated. Just started when I was pregnant a year ago. This is the first book I read; all the rest of my research has been on the web. I am surprised by this chill business too. But most of all, I felt this book was very poorly written, which made it hard to take the info seriously. She seems very knowledgeable, but the book feels almost un-edited. A lot of people on here seem to conclude that hygiene is a huge factor in the incidence of these diseases, which seems logical, and she challenges that. She seems to be suggesting that "hygienists" are saying that improved hygiene keeps the disease from being virulent, but my understanding is that it would mostly just keep people from getting it and passing it on. I would love to hear more feedback on this book, too.
post #3 of 24
Well, I liked her book very much and feel her ill child care is fabulous. I agree with her, I do not think it is wise to put a feverish child in a temped bath to "cool" them down, a fever has a purpose, let it run, watch it, but let it do it's God's given purpose of fighting off whatever is making your child ill.

I haven't given it a recent read, it's been over a year. I think her advice is solid.
post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallacesmum View Post
I am not an educated anti-vax mama; I am a mama who is not vaxing while I am in the process of getting educated. Just started when I was pregnant a year ago. This is the first book I read; all the rest of my research has been on the web. I am surprised by this chill business too. But most of all, I felt this book was very poorly written, which made it hard to take the info seriously. She seems very knowledgeable, but the book feels almost un-edited. A lot of people on here seem to conclude that hygiene is a huge factor in the incidence of these diseases, which seems logical, and she challenges that. She seems to be suggesting that "hygienists" are saying that improved hygiene keeps the disease from being virulent, but my understanding is that it would mostly just keep people from getting it and passing it on. I would love to hear more feedback on this book, too.
Haven't read the book, but my take on the hygiene question is like this:

Dirty water spreads disease, no doubt about it. A normal degree of poor housekeeping does not, generally, cause ill health or make minor diseases more severe. However, in times past, people lived in a degree of filth that most of us cannot possibly imagine, especially in big cities. For poor people bathing may have been literally impossible, a change of clothes unavailable, drinking water a challenge to obtain. Of course the course of disease was more virulent! Add in chronic malnutrition, overcrowding, overwork...

An example I've used before. In the town of Pullman, ordinary folks had some of the finest working class housing in 19th century America. What did it offer? One cold water faucet for every 5 (five) households. Extrapolate to a slum and try to imagine how difficult it was to nurse a child through an ordinary illness, without running water, electricity, adequate bedding, privacy and lots of other stuff that we just take totally for granted.

Many of the people in the world still live in horrific conditions...

Deborah
post #5 of 24
She self published her book, so she didn't have a real editor. Combine that with poor writing skills, and the book was painful to read. I also had a hard time taking her seriously.
post #6 of 24
Wow, I'm really surprised at the reaction to this book. I am super nitpicky about writing style, etc. and I did not have this reaction.

I did think she seemed extreme in that she believes homeopathy can cure any severe illness. It may be true, but i haven't gotten that crunchy yet!

But I found the book to be extremely informative and gave me lots of food for thought.

I wondered about the chill thing too though.
XOXO
B
post #7 of 24
I am enjoying this book for the most part. I do agree about it being somewhat hard to read. I'm willing to follow her advice should ds ever get sick, as I'm a big believer in homeopathy and herbs (after seeing both work on me, ds, my husband, mom, dad, MIL, and some of my friends).

I'm thinking of getting Aviva Jill Romm's book as well, as that has a lot of good advice on treating sick children.
post #8 of 24
Can you give a page number so that people know where, and what you are talking about?
post #9 of 24
The chill issue is commonly found in natural/alternative healing modalities. Chinese medicine addresses this issue as does homeopathy, naturopathy and herbology and such. I've heard of recommendations to never sleep directly on the ground because of the chill it can give the body and how the chakras and qi are affected. Western medicine doesn't give any merrit to these issues. Chinese medicine also teaches that going out with wet hair can make you sick. It's a different approach to the body working as a whole and even it's components. I haven't read the book, but perhaps the author is writing from a different belief system than you are familiar with.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MammaV View Post
The chill issue is commonly found in natural/alternative healing modalities. Chinese medicine addresses this issue as does homeopathy, naturopathy and herbology and such. I've heard of recommendations to never sleep directly on the ground because of the chill it can give the body and how the chakras and qi are affected. Western medicine doesn't give any merrit to these issues. Chinese medicine also teaches that going out with wet hair can make you sick. It's a different approach to the body working as a whole and even it's components. I haven't read the book, but perhaps the author is writing from a different belief system than you are familiar with.
This makes sense.....my mom never wanted me outside with a wet head (every time I did I got sick!). One of the few times it snowed here I got pelted with snowballs at school and had my whole body soaked (and while I did try off my feet remained soaked) and I got sick.
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
MT (typing one handed here)

I'm sorry but I do not recall the page number. Sadly there is no index. She talks about catching a chill in the beginning of her book. I understand not chilling a sick child but it almost like she believes you can "catch a cold" because you forgot your coat. Maybe she is right? sorry have to go...just interested in everyone's thoughts on catching a chill...wishi had time to type more.
post #12 of 24
Yeah, they did a medical study last year, which found that this "old wives tale" as they talked about it, was correct. I never looked at the study, but did cut out the article to put it in my "old wives tales proved right yet again" file.

You can "catch a cold" from getting cold.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MammaV View Post
The chill issue is commonly found in natural/alternative healing modalities. Chinese medicine addresses this issue as does homeopathy, naturopathy and herbology and such. I've heard of recommendations to never sleep directly on the ground because of the chill it can give the body and how the chakras and qi are affected. Western medicine doesn't give any merrit to these issues. Chinese medicine also teaches that going out with wet hair can make you sick. It's a different approach to the body working as a whole and even it's components. I haven't read the book, but perhaps the author is writing from a different belief system than you are familiar with.

My DH is always telling me not to do this or that b/c of these reasonings ...
his mom & grandma taught him these things & they are from Romania.
wet hair, bare feet , laying on the ground etc ... things like that my parents never told me not to do any of these things: we are always debating if it matters
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk_mum View Post
his mom & grandma taught him these things & they are from Romania.
wet hair, bare feet , laying on the ground etc ... things like that my parents never told me not to do any of these things: we are always debating if it matters
Do they also believe kids shouldn't eat anything cold, and windows should always be closed (in a country with NO A/C) because the breeze will hurt kid's ears?
My DH is Romanian, and my MIL stays half the year with us. I love her, but I get such a laugh out of horrifying her with cold drinks and windy rides!
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommietime View Post
Do they also believe kids shouldn't eat anything cold, and windows should always be closed (in a country with NO A/C) because the breeze will hurt kid's ears?
My DH is Romanian, and my MIL stays half the year with us. I love her, but I get such a laugh out of horrifying her with cold drinks and windy rides!
Kids shouldn't eat or drink anything cold, windows should always be closed unless we are airing the room in which case everything breathing should be evacuated, hats are to be worn outside all year round except for summer (ears covered), hot milk is the best remedy for colds, under no circumstances should children walk with bare feet inside or outside, and if girls sit on the ground or, God forbid, on cold stone, they will get ovarian infection and end up sterile.

Did I miss anything ? You don't have to be Romanian to know that
post #16 of 24
Yes, you missed a heap of stuff. But I'm too tired to add to the list.

But the bit about getting cold is true.
post #17 of 24
HAHAHA....oh man I think I peed a little!

I am barefoot the vast majority of the time, and nothing but Tevas for 2 years otherwise (of course I've been pregnant most of that time)....but my own DH is the ONLY Romanian I have EVER seen walk barefoot anywhere!!!! All the relatives are constantly trying to get me to wear their slippers!

But I thought the sitting on cold stone thing gave you hemorrhoids....that is I think what my grandmother said!
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momtezuma Tuatara View Post
Yes, you missed a heap of stuff. But I'm too tired to add to the list.

But the bit about getting cold is true.
Are you sure?
I know I'm a little eccentric,: : : but I've been testing that hypothosis for a while, and I haven't been able to get sick from getting cold.
And I've tried.
post #19 of 24
Well, it depends how much you believe the medical profession. They did a big study with the aim of proving wrong, the "old wives tales" about going out and getting wet and cold, causing colds.

I never got the study, but I did cut out the newspaper study reporting that they were a bit miffed that the old wives were proven correct.

I know that if I get cold, and wet, and don't get dry and warm pretty quick, I can easily get a cold.

But then, we know I'm queer.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 

old thread

mt- did you write this book? just wondering. sorry if that is a ludicrous question.

i really want to take ds1 outisde b/c he has cold and i think the fresh will help him hack up the gook. gross i know. but he hates to wear a coat and i don't want him to catch a chill. seriously. i'm not sure.

everyone is miserably sick except for me. ds1 almost completely vaxed and ds2 unvaxed and exclusively breastfed. dh and i took 2000 mg of vitamin c (emergen-c) but i think he should take more b/c he is heavier than i am.
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