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Have you all seen this innovation in bread making??!! - Page 3

post #41 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by yitlan View Post
Oooh...yes, my crust was thick, too, and I used a clay pot. But dh loves thick crust, so I didn't even think about it. I prefer a thinner crust, though. Thanks for the tip! I'll soak my pot next time, too. Oh wait, will it still help if you soak the pot and then let it bake in the oven for that half hour before adding the dough? Or will the water just bake/evaporate right out before even adding the dough?
Good question . . . I think you have to heat clay with the oven anyway so it doesn't break from the shock of instant heat. But the oven itself would still stay humid, I would think.
post #42 of 189
well i tried this recipe twice over the weekend. first loaf i ground red wheat berries, dough didn't really rise, baked it anyway, turned out flat but tasty.

second loaf, i used king arthur whole wheat flour (didn't want to spend the time running wheat berries through the coffee mill till i'd worked the kinks out of the recipe), i realized i didn't have 'instant yeast' so i used warm water this time, and put it in my oven since my kitchens kinda cold. dough rose nicely by 12 hours, but had fallen some by 18 hours, when i poured it out to form my ball i realized the bottom half was really runny. the dough ran everywhere. i added some flour and let it sit for 2 hours, then baked it. a real disappointment, flat and hard. i think my oven was too hot, and i overcooked it a bit. when i broke it open there were a few holes in it, unlike the first time.

i like the idea of this recipe, but so far i'm pretty disappointed. maybe i'll try again with sourdough starter (i've been growing one and it's been over a week now and i think its ready). and less water next time. i don't have a le crueset pan, so i've been using a ceramic bowl with my baking stone on top for a lid.
post #43 of 189
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomlynn View Post
What are you using if you don't have plastic wrap.
I've just keeping mine in the bowl and covering the bowl with one of those shower cap looking things. So it's covered, but not wrapped. No problems so far.
post #44 of 189
yitlan, for the 23 hour rise I did, the dough did fall back a bit. Which was nice, because I wondered if my sourdough beasties were going to make it overflow the bowl I had it in!

The crust on my second loaf was not as thick as the first. Maybe less steam because the dough was not as wet?

To do rolls, I would consider plopping small balls of dough on the bottom of the pan and cut the baking time. Not something I have thought hard about yet.

There was no commercial yeast used in the kitchen this weekend, just sourdough. The sandwich bread I make, I have switched to using starter as well.
post #45 of 189
Here are mine: bread
bread pic

I did 3/4 unbleached AP and 1/4 stoneground WW with a 18 hour rise. It was a little flat so at the first "knead" I used almost another cup of flour. I'm loving my new Le Cruset pot for this though. I've got the 5.5qt size.

Deb
post #46 of 189
Thread Starter 
Beautiful, Deb! For my third attempt (I'm taking a loaf to my wapf chapter mtg tonight), I soaked my claywear and got a lighter looking crust, though I haven't cut into it yet. I let the stones heat up, and put some water into the lid pan as it heated. Then I put the dough in and dumped the water out before putting the lid on. It looks the best yet. I also made my dough a little more watery than my last loaf. It cooked up nicely!
post #47 of 189
i was going to try a third attempt at this bread, but my sourdough starter that i've been growing was moldy! : now i have to start all over again trying to catch one.
post #48 of 189
FYI, I gave a couple of slices of this bread to a friend who is from Italy. He told me that he and his wife have not had bread like this in the states. When his father comes to visit from Italy over the holidays, this is what they are going to make for him.

It was the sourdough version that got this response.
post #49 of 189
I just want to thank yitlan for posting the link to this recipe! I have tried before to make sourdough but my cultures were never great. In fact, once my culture developed some form of gluten-devouring beast that sucked all the gluten out of my bread before I could even get it kneaded. So I gave up (yeah, not too much stick-with-it-ness) and resigned myself to yeasted loaves, more-or-less. But using this recipe I made a nice sourdough-tasting loaf using some oatmeal and amaranth (about 3/4 c. oatmeal, 1/4. amaranth) that I soaked in about 1/2 kefir for 24 hours before adding the recipe ingredients to that mixture, and then letting the whole thing sit for about 13 hours. I think the dough was on the moist side, though, but great flavour! And all I had was a cast-iron skillet to cook it in. So thanks again - this will be my bread of choice.
post #50 of 189
Can someone post or pm the recipe please? I lost my word document where I'd pasted it, and I can't get to it from the links or my bookmarks anymore.
post #51 of 189
Links aren't working anymore. Anyone have the recipe?
post #52 of 189
Thread Starter 

Recipe!

Recipe: No-Knead Bread

Published: November 8, 2006

Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery
Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising

Forum: Cooking and Recipes

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting
¼ teaspoon instant yeast
1¼ teaspoons salt
Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

Yield: One 1½-pound loaf.
post #53 of 189

Sweeeeeet

I did my first loaf today. Wowsa, this is the best bread I've ever made. I used King Arthur White Whole Wheat, raised the water to 1 3/4 c (not sure why; just felt better), let it sit for maybe 21 hours for the first rise, and baked in in a cast iron Dutch Oven. It was pretty flat, but not at all dense. The crust was amazing, and all three of us couldn't stop eating it (not really a good thing around here).

I'd like to hear how doubling the recipe goes as far as making sandwich bread. If it weren't for the fact that we pack DH sandwiches for lunch, I'd just pile stuff on the slices as they are, but ideally it would be a little higher.
post #54 of 189
why am i having such problems with this bread? : my 3rd loaf was a complete disaster. rose then fell during the first 24 hour rise, never to rise again. and while the consistency is fine in the beginning, after 24 hours its practically liquid. my kitchens fairly cold, so i've been sticking it in the oven with the light on, maybe thats too warm? oops. just noticed the recipe calls for rising at 70 degrees. my oven is 95. maybe thats my problem... my kitchen is only about 60 degrees though. why is this so difficult??!!
post #55 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaquitita View Post
my kitchens fairly cold, so i've been sticking it in the oven with the light on, maybe thats too warm? oops. just noticed the recipe calls for rising at 70 degrees. my oven is 95. maybe thats my problem... my kitchen is only about 60 degrees though. why is this so difficult??!!
My bread didn't rise very much either (my kitchen is cold too)...so I was going to put it in my dd's room overnight to rise. We keep it warmer in there overnight with a little heater. I am not sure what I am going to do about the second rising time.
post #56 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaquitita View Post
why am i having such problems with this bread? : my 3rd loaf was a complete disaster. rose then fell during the first 24 hour rise, never to rise again. and while the consistency is fine in the beginning, after 24 hours its practically liquid. my kitchens fairly cold, so i've been sticking it in the oven with the light on, maybe thats too warm? oops. just noticed the recipe calls for rising at 70 degrees. my oven is 95. maybe thats my problem... my kitchen is only about 60 degrees though. why is this so difficult??!!
I thought it only called for a 12-18 hour rise. That could explain why it is rising and falling. Maybe only let it rise in that range.
post #57 of 189
it did the same thing with an 18 hour rise. maybe i'll try 12 hours next time, it hasn't fallen at that point yet.
post #58 of 189
I really want to try this. I usually make bread in a breadmaker, but am craving an artisan type bread. I don't have a sourdough starter and am going to try it with the yeast. A couple of questions:

- What's instant yeast? Is it the same as the regular yeast that comes in those packets?
- Did anyone other than Phroggies try it with whole grain flour? Wondering if I will have a denser bread with whole grain...
post #59 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaquitita View Post
just noticed the recipe calls for rising at 70 degrees. my oven is 95. maybe thats my problem... my kitchen is only about 60 degrees though. why is this so difficult??!!
I don't know if this will help you troubleshoot, but for the first rise, I kept it in my oven, turning the light on now and then to bump the temp up just a little (our kitchen is usually around 59-61 as well, and I think with the light on my oven is about 90). For the second rise, I just left it out on the kitchen. Also, I went with the "poke" test for the second rise--it didn't really look as if it had risen that much but it wasn't bouncing back after I poked at it.

Just going by the size of the loaf I would have thought it hadn't risen enough. But the crumb was great--light and fluffy without too many big holes, which says to me that the rise was just about right.

Saratc, I think instant yeast is the same thing that comes in the packets. I've got a big jar of it that I got in bulk at the local co-op about 5 years ago. . . I'm surprised it has any power left in it at all. But I dimly remember not being sure whether they were the same thing and looking it up to find out that they were.
post #60 of 189
Yes, instant yeas can come in those packets. Just be sure you don't have "quick rising" on the packet. That could change things a bit. And, if you store yeast in the fridge, it will last longer. I have a big bag I bought at costco that "expired" a year ago, and it is still going strong.
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