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Line dryers help

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
okay, so I got and installed my indoor clothsline. I have hung up three loads of laundry. First I can never get my whole load up. It worries me that the only retractable line I could find has a 20 lb weight limit. But it is only 20 ft long. I was able to put up about 16 because of the length of the room. But my biggest problem is that I thought my clothes weren't susposed to be wrinkly. I never had wrinkly clothes out of the dryer. I had heard that one plus was that your clothes wouldn't get wrinkly like they do in a dryer. So what is up here? Am I not doing it right? My husband is just kinda laughing at my efforts here. He used to line dry, outside, all the time. He has shown me a few tricks, like to only use 3 pins to hold up two clothes, but I am not sure if it is just my lack of wind that makes my clothes look so crumpled or what. Help, so I can get my husband to stop laughing at me
post #2 of 12
I wish I could say that hanging clothes when I was growing up left them w/out wrinkles........as our ironing board was a fixture or piece of furniture back then! I would still line dry if hubby would support it, but he won't (and if I were home full time). It's much easier on the clothes, and they last longer. Sheets on the line??? Now, you're talking!
post #3 of 12
I usually have some wrinkles, but there are some ways of minimizing them. Do you shake out the clothes before you hang them? I find that really snapping them hard helps a great deal (it also makes them dry faster). If you can, you can also give a firm tug on the item once it's on the line. Finally, I find that hanging dress clothes on hangers and smoothing them a bit works fairly well (but we've never been big on that whole crisply ironed look).

As for hanging the whole load, is your concern about the weight on the line, or about fitting things on there? If it's the latter, try hanging dress clothes on hangers. This saves space and omits a step since you can then just transfer them directly to the closet (I also put the hangers on shower rods if I run out of space). Another tip that I just came across in a book is that sometimes you can clip smaller objects (socks, for instance) to the bottom of larger ones. If you're hanging a light item (say, a dish towel) and it doesn't matter if it gets pulled out of shape, just hang it by one corner.
post #4 of 12
Ummm, I can't really give you any line-drying advice but I just wanted to say if you end up with wrinkly clothes you can always spray them with water and flatten them out on a bed or other flat surface before you wear them if the wrinkles are bothering you. That is how I iron! :
post #5 of 12
The 20lb limit is because you've got a 20ft span. It's hard to explain the physics involved without being able to draw diagrams, but basically think of the clothesline as a lever, and the clothes as a force applied to the lever. If you can support the line along the middle, you'll be able to hang up more clothes safely (i.e. without ripping the line out of the wall.)
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by VnJW View Post
okay, so I got and installed my indoor clothsline. I have hung up three loads of laundry. First I can never get my whole load up. It worries me that the only retractable line I could find has a 20 lb weight limit. But it is only 20 ft long. I was able to put up about 16 because of the length of the room. But my biggest problem is that I thought my clothes weren't susposed to be wrinkly. I never had wrinkly clothes out of the dryer. I had heard that one plus was that your clothes wouldn't get wrinkly like they do in a dryer. So what is up here? Am I not doing it right? My husband is just kinda laughing at my efforts here. He used to line dry, outside, all the time. He has shown me a few tricks, like to only use 3 pins to hold up two clothes, but I am not sure if it is just my lack of wind that makes my clothes look so crumpled or what. Help, so I can get my husband to stop laughing at me
We constructed our own indoor clotheline system, so I can't tell you much about the weight limit - except, that your lines are problably "too" long.

Regarding the wrinkels - there are 3 things that help me getting almost wrinklefree clothes:

1. I pat every piece of clothing down, before I hang it up
2. I never let things sit in the washer, if it has to sit, I fold it up before hand, that really helps
3. I hang things that will go on a hanger right away on a hanger - except woolen or cotten knitted sweaters, as the water will misform the shapes.

Hope my explanations were helpful.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Our line isn't actually installed the way it should be. I messed it up. My husband again laughed that it would only happen to me that I tried to hammer the anchors into studs. So it is actually in studs on both walls, you think that would help the weight limit?
We actually hang pretty much all of our clothes, so if I were to hang them instead of pinning them I could fit a load on the line. I am a poor judge of weight when I am pregnant though, everything feels heavier and gets heavier every week. Maybe i should have my husband tell me about how heavy a wet basket of clothes is. I have actually been pretty good about getting them right out of the washer.
I will try ya'lls suggestions though. I am sure they will help a lot. Thank you. I will get the hang of this. I will save us money and I will make our clothes last longer
post #8 of 12
If it starts sagging--stop hanging?
post #9 of 12
Here's my lazy-line-drying:

I drape everything over the line, no pins. Yeah, it's wrinkly and it has a fold line (from where it's draped over the line). Once everything is dry, I put it in the dryer. I have a 'wrinkle release' setting that is done in ten minutes or so. It just fluffs the clothes with a minimal amount of heat. So yeah, I am still using the dryer, but it's only running for 10 minutes instead of 80.

Aven
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for bringing this back up, I was actually going to search for it today as I pulled down my clothes from the line. I am hanging up all of our clothes that would be hung up anyway, except for pants, those I am doing like the pp said, just hanging them over the line. It is the best way to dry for them, since my clothes line is hung low, I am short, my dhs pants can't be hung. And that is how I am doing our undies and socks too. I haven't had many wrinkles since shaking them out either. There are a few things that are wrinkled but I will check my dryer to see if there is a wrinkle release. I am still running all my cloth through the dryer, so I still do use it. There is a slight down side I am finding. This may mostly be because I am pregnant. I kinda depend on my dryer to slightly shrink my pants. They tend to get stretched out and then they keep falling down. So my dryer used to keep this from happening
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by VnJW View Post
T I will check my dryer to see if there is a wrinkle release.
FWIW, I don't think you need a specific setting for this. If you don't have that setting, just try the last 10 minutes of the normal cycle.
post #12 of 12
Yeah, most dryers have a Timed option. Ten minutes should be fine.

Aven
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