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Childcare providers' tribe? - Page 9

post #161 of 733

new baby in my care

wanted to share new developments in my little business. I have started watching an additional baby, 6 weeks old, in addition to the 6-month old girl and my own one-year-old boy (b-day tomorrow!). This is the first time in ages that I'll be watching two kids and making more moeny. We really need it (have to pay private school tuition for my 2 DDs) !!!

So far it has been good. All the babies are easy-going, and having 3 of them in the morning is a breeze compared to having my toddler here after she comes from school.
post #162 of 733
thanks so much you are all making me feel so much better and if i just keep waiting the right people will come. the analysis of pricing in my area was particularly help as i can now use that as a reference in discussions with parents! i have tried putting up fliers and they all got taken down, so i didnt really think about trying it again... now i think i will give it another try.
post #163 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaelita View Post
I think that people pay less when they bring the kid to you because of the inconvenience to them;
Just want to note, "inconvenience" is not the reason I expect to pay less to a care provider I drop off to, than to a care provider in my home.

Honestly I feel like the two are apples and oranges. All of the home child care providers I have known IRL use TV pretty liberally to keep the kids occupied so they can "get things done" (i.e., do their own housework). They run the kids all over town doing their errands. They typically have other families' kids there, so that there becomes quite a concentration of germs from multiple sources. Etc.

Not saying that any folks on this thread are this way, but as a WOHM who has looked at alot of home daycare settings at this point, I have a sense of what is "typical" and my expectations have dropped pretty low. This isn't meant in a snarky way at all, but I am always baffled by people saying they don't understand why they can't get nanny rates for doing care in their own home. Working parents who can afford to pay top-dollar nanny rates, do so for the very reason of having control over the situation, having the care provided in their own residence, on their terms, with the child exposed to only the foods/toys/people the parents have chosen and approved. You give up all of this when you take your child to someone else's home, where they are free to run things their way, take in more kids if they choose, etc. THAT is why a nanny gets $10/hour and a home daycare gets $3.

FWIW, our back-up nanny (for when preschool is closed, I wish we could afford her fulltime but we can't) brings her 1-year-old with her and we're fine with it. But mainly that is because she has been a really good fit for our family, being naturally AP/NFL herself. We found her through a flyer she put on the bulletin board at our co-op, so that approach really does work!
post #164 of 733
I think that very reason is why i am having a difficult time finding families who are looking for the type of care i offer. as a natural, attachment mama, and educator i think it is very important that children are not plopped in front of a tv all day! i dont know how to help parents make that distinction with me. what i am trying to offer is something better than a daycare center where your whole child will be nurtured, loved, and provided for. it is so hard to leave your child in the first place, i want my home to be like their second home, not their hang out! on a side note i am not trying to get nanny rates of $10-12 an hour... i am trying to get $180 a week, or $4.50 an hour how many people with 2 degrees do you know who are willing to work for that?
post #165 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by femuhnistmama View Post
I think that very reason is why i am having a difficult time finding families who are looking for the type of care i offer. as a natural, attachment mama, and educator i think it is very important that children are not plopped in front of a tv all day! i dont know how to help parents make that distinction with me. what i am trying to offer is something better than a daycare center where your whole child will be nurtured, loved, and provided for. it is so hard to leave your child in the first place, i want my home to be like their second home, not their hang out! on a side note i am not trying to get nanny rates of $10-12 an hour... i am trying to get $180 a week, or $4.50 an hour how many people with 2 degrees do you know who are willing to work for that?
I get about $3 an hour per child on average...but I'm NOT making $3 an hour. I'm taking care of up to 7 children at a time....so when all 7 are here that's $21 an hour. 100% of my home is used for childcare 40% of the time...so 40% of all of my utilities are tax deductible. The percentage that daycare kids use my kid's toys is deductible etc. I think the main difference is a nanny is an employee and I'm a small business owner. I provide a service on my terms with my rules. Also, as a licensed provider I get a lot of perks. Easter Seals comes to my home to do a 6 week program every year (once a week). They do activities with the kids and help me evaluate their developement. The local resource and referal office sponsors really cool classes. I average one class a month. The last class I went to was called "Bust a Move" it was about gross motor activities and I got to take home a play parachute to use for gross motor games, a hullahoop and a big thick book full of activities divided by age group. Next month is a math workshop, the month after that an early reading skills workshop. There is a yearly tax workshop, brain developement classes etc. I can also take classes on curriculum developement. The best part is, that being licensed gets me on the referal list and I've never had to advertise. Granted, some of the regs are just plain stupid...but most of them are there for a good reason.
post #166 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by moondiapers View Post
I get about $3 an hour per child on average...but I'm NOT making $3 an hour. I'm taking care of up to 7 children at a time....so when all 7 are here that's $21 an hour. 100% of my home is used for childcare 40% of the time...so 40% of all of my utilities are tax deductible. The percentage that daycare kids use my kid's toys is deductible etc. I think the main difference is a nanny is an employee and I'm a small business owner. I provide a service on my terms with my rules. Also, as a licensed provider I get a lot of perks. Easter Seals comes to my home to do a 6 week program every year (once a week). They do activities with the kids and help me evaluate their developement. The local resource and referal office sponsors really cool classes. I average one class a month. The last class I went to was called "Bust a Move" it was about gross motor activities and I got to take home a play parachute to use for gross motor games, a hullahoop and a big thick book full of activities divided by age group. Next month is a math workshop, the month after that an early reading skills workshop. There is a yearly tax workshop, brain developement classes etc. I can also take classes on curriculum developement. The best part is, that being licensed gets me on the referal list and I've never had to advertise. Granted, some of the regs are just plain stupid...but most of them are there for a good reason.
I totally agree with this again.... I cannot stress enough HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO GET LISCENSED. if you are trying to start a business, why not jump through the hoops to do things right? I am not in any way suggesting that you arent going to do things right, but getting lisenced shows the parents that you are seriouis, you have made the nessecary changes in your home to make it safe, its been checked out by an expert. You need some training, like first aid/ cpr and a few other classes... this shows you are aiming to be professional, not in it just o make a quick buck. Once you are lisenced, I promise yuou will find families that will pay you what you are worth.

It took me from March until October (in 2004) to get everything done I needed to do to get lisenced in my home/town. It was a huge pay off though. I am now full to capacity, I have a waiting list of children. This is my business. And fwiw, I dont "plop kids in front of the TV" so I can get my housework done!! My daycare is on a different level of my house (its in the walk-out basement) so when the kids are here, thats where I am except for nap time, when I come to the office.
post #167 of 733
i have my first aid and cpr certification i also have a few hours of continuing ed aquired, several years of experience, etc...what else is typically required? I havent really gotten started yet and my fear is i will put a lot of time and effort into it and still not get any families.
post #168 of 733
Its defferent from State to State. You need to call your local Health Department (thats who handles it in Kansas) and they will tell you whet you need to know. In Kansas, you need 15 hours of training to start and then 5 hours of training every year after that. They offer training classes at the Health Department on all sorts of things, ALso you can take classes through referral agencies (look in the phone book for this info or maybe online) College courses count, as long as they are recent and relevant. I PROMISE you will get families if you put forth the effort. You might check your local laws as well, because in kansas it illegal to care for any number of children in your home on a regular basis if htey are not related to you. Even if its only one kid every thursday morning from 8am to 10am. But (if you go to previous pages you'll find this discuusion) in SF's state, she can watch a certain number without being liable. I'd just reccommend making a phone call to the Health Department and finding out what your states regualtion are... maybe you already have everything you need!!
post #169 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaelita View Post
I was wondering how other people deal with holidays. Up till now I have never charged for holidays (I charge by the hour, so I get paid only for the time the babies are actually here.) I never take time off for my vacation, so I am not talking about the parents paying for my time off. I am talking about those days that I am available to work, but the parents are off. We are Jewish and observant, so the holidays really add up, both Jewish and secular (like I said, I can work on secular holidays, but parents who work for large companies do get those days off, even if they don't celebraste them).

Should I charge maybe 50% for those days that I am available to work? I need to get compensated in some way. What do you folks do?
I'm an employee, so I don't get to set my own policies, but I know what you mean about the Jewish and secular holidays adding up. I get paid for the legal holidays here, but I wish I could work those and switch the paid days off to the Jewish holidays. I also get other paid days off for my own vacation (but the parents don't have to pay for those, I just get paid by my employer), but they get used up so quickly with all the Jewish holidays and then I don't have any left over to take a holiday when I can actually go away somewhere. I have been thinking of being open on yomim tovim (Jewish holidays). Not that I want to work a full day, but I know that a lot of parents use the shul's childcare services on those days. I'm not sure it would be possible for me to be open, halachically (have to ask a rav), but if I could be it might be cool. I would like to have a children's service or some such. It seems like it would be better than the childcare offered by some shuls, since they have non-Jewish teachers and I don't have any idea what the Jewish content of the care would be. My own kids would like it, too, I think. Probably the parents would only send their children for a couple hours, and I would still get paid for the entire day.

Anyway, sorry for rambling...
post #170 of 733
Do some of you have websites you'd be willing to share?
post #171 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
Do some of you have websites you'd be willing to share?
I wish I had a website... I would like to learn how to make one, though.

BinahYeteirah, thanks for your response. Maybe I should move to Australia?
Regarding being open on yom tov, that's an interesting idea. Except that the two families I work with probably won't need me. One family lives too far away to walk, and the othe one lives in the same building with one set of grandparents, so they grandparents would probably do the babyisitting if the parents wanted to go to shul.
On the other hand, I have a neighbor who brings me her baby part-time (twice a week at night), and she uses me occasionally on shabbos (we have an eruv in the building, but not in the city). I would not mind if she used me more - I am always home on shabbos anyway.
post #172 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday View Post
Just want to note, "inconvenience" is not the reason I expect to pay less to a care provider I drop off to, than to a care provider in my home.

Honestly I feel like the two are apples and oranges. All of the home child care providers I have known IRL use TV pretty liberally to keep the kids occupied so they can "get things done" (i.e., do their own housework). They run the kids all over town doing their errands. They typically have other families' kids there, so that there becomes quite a concentration of germs from multiple sources. Etc.

Not saying that any folks on this thread are this way, but as a WOHM who has looked at alot of home daycare settings at this point, I have a sense of what is "typical" and my expectations have dropped pretty low. This isn't meant in a snarky way at all, but I am always baffled by people saying they don't understand why they can't get nanny rates for doing care in their own home. Working parents who can afford to pay top-dollar nanny rates, do so for the very reason of having control over the situation, having the care provided in their own residence, on their terms, with the child exposed to only the foods/toys/people the parents have chosen and approved. You give up all of this when you take your child to someone else's home, where they are free to run things their way, take in more kids if they choose, etc. THAT is why a nanny gets $10/hour and a home daycare gets $3.

FWIW, our back-up nanny (for when preschool is closed, I wish we could afford her fulltime but we can't) brings her 1-year-old with her and we're fine with it. But mainly that is because she has been a really good fit for our family, being naturally AP/NFL herself. We found her through a flyer she put on the bulletin board at our co-op, so that approach really does work!
It is really unfortunate you feel this way or have had a bad experience with a home daycare provider. We are not all like the example you gave above.

I provide much warmth and care to my dckids. We do activities and play and snuggle. We read and sing and dance.

On thing that bugs me about some home daycare searchers is their expectations. Granted a provider needs to be upfront about her approach to daycare. But this said, I provide home daycare with the attitude that I want kids to feel like they ARE at home. Basically this means that there is not a curriculum ( I am NOT a school) but a schedule. We learn through play. We go outside when we want, we read when we want, we bake cookies when we want etc etc. And yes, we do watch TV when we want. Yes, it is limited but we do watch it.

I love my job and I honestly think I do a pretty darned good job at it. I do not watch "family members", I do not have visitors over during daycare hours, I do not do housework...... Right now, I am on the computer. Why? Because I am sitting here in my kitchen watching all of the wonderful little kids I have here smiling and giggling and using their imaginations while playing Play-Doh. So, many parents who share your opinion would say I was "not doing my job right now". I disagree. The kids are content and they are supervised and I am taking a 10 minute break. I work all day without a real break and don't see a problem with doing what I am doing right now.

As for money. Yes, each child I have equals about $3.75 per hour. But, I have 5 kids in my care. That is about $19 Per hour that I earn.
post #173 of 733
I am not licenced, but am registered with the state. I like that my state *Iowa* has really put forth an effort to get quality in home childcare providers. They have a new rating system that you can go through and you get $ rewards for completing it. Also you can apply for grants that will help get things for your daycare. I am looking at getting a $500 grant and will be getting $400 when I reach a rating of 2. The ratings go all the way up to 5 with a $1000 reward. I have to take a series of 10 classes, but the classes are free and can count for my required hours I have to take each year.

For me I am home with my kids and feel like I am actually using my degree (which is in child development) I was not registered for the first 5 years of doing childcare. Now that I am I realize how great it is to be because of the benefits and it causes me to be more organized in how I do things
post #174 of 733
I live in Ontario, Canada.


Most home daycare providers are NOT licensed here. Why? The government has a stupid set up for this kind of thing. Basically, to be registered you must work for an agency. This means that someone owns a daycare agency and 'hires' home providers. Then the agency provides the kids and collects all the money etc. So, as a provider all you have to do is be at home and care for the kids and you get a pay cheque. Sound wonderful? It isn't really!

First, in my experience, the provider is usually the one who ends up finding parents and then directs them to the agency. If you leave the agency you have to give up all your kids as there is a non-compete clause in their contract that both the provider and the parents sign. And, lastly, the agency charges the parents (in my area) $35 a day but the provider only gets $22 a day! Of course, the provider is still required to pay for all the food,k craft supplies etc. Some agencies have some bare essential equipment you can borrow.

Unfortunately, as you can see, being licensed has huge drawbacks here. If I were with an agency I could not survive financially. There is a big difference. For me being on my own and unlicensed is a difference of $65 a day!!!

So, you can see that sometimes being unlicensed is not always about someones lack of desire but rather something that is virtually impossible in a practical sense.
post #175 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by melissabb View Post
I live in Ontario, Canada.


Most home daycare providers are NOT licensed here. Why? The government has a stupid set up for this kind of thing. Basically, to be registered you must work for an agency. This means that someone owns a daycare agency and 'hires' home providers. Then the agency provides the kids and collects all the money etc. So, as a provider all you have to do is be at home and care for the kids and you get a pay cheque. Sound wonderful? It isn't really!

First, in my experience, the provider is usually the one who ends up finding parents and then directs them to the agency. If you leave the agency you have to give up all your kids as there is a non-compete clause in their contract that both the provider and the parents sign. And, lastly, the agency charges the parents (in my area) $35 a day but the provider only gets $22 a day! Of course, the provider is still required to pay for all the food,k craft supplies etc. Some agencies have some bare essential equipment you can borrow.

Unfortunately, as you can see, being licensed has huge drawbacks here. If I were with an agency I could not survive financially. There is a big difference. For me being on my own and unlicensed is a difference of $65 a day!!!

So, you can see that sometimes being unlicensed is not always about someones lack of desire but rather something that is virtually impossible in a practical sense.
Yes, but melissabb...when has our gov't ever made sense?

In all seriousness, that must be a provincal gov't thing, because there is no such program here, I'm in NS. There is a pilot program going on, but it's not through daycare centres, it's through the Dept of Community Services. They will help you fill your spaces but you are paid directly from the parents. There are only 3 towns in the province doing it so far, and the Dept is looking into expansion.
post #176 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by melissabb View Post
So, many parents who share your opinion would say I was "not doing my job right now". I disagree.
I am not exactly sure what opinion you feel I have. You gave examples of how when providing care in your home, you will do things your way (including limited TV since you feel that's appropriate). I think you have every right to do that. I was trying to explain why I would feel I had more control over things being done "my way" if I were to pay a nanny to come to my home. Sorry if I stepped on your toes.
post #177 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday View Post
I am not exactly sure what opinion you feel I have. You gave examples of how when providing care in your home, you will do things your way (including limited TV since you feel that's appropriate). I think you have every right to do that. I was trying to explain why I would feel I had more control over things being done "my way" if I were to pay a nanny to come to my home. Sorry if I stepped on your toes.
No hard feelings!

I guess sometimes as a home daycare provider I am quick to perceive someone as judgemental.

Honestly, in this business I have come across so many people who think that we just sit around all day watching soap operas in one room while the other kids are plunked in front of the TV all day in another room. KWIM?

Home daycare is hard work if you are a good provider. And yes, I CAN see why some parents view us as glorified babysitters. I too, know of that "kind of provider" . I wouldn't send my own kids to her to spare my life.

So, no hard feelings.

I guess I am so used to trying to get people to put value into what we do that I am always on my soapbox. KWIM?
post #178 of 733
When I worked in 'big daycare' I always felt like it was difficult to get respect from the general public for the hard work I did, and my level of education. I felt like I needed to walk around broadcasting that I was university educated. Now?? I really feel like it is hard to get respect at all. I don't plunk kids in front of the TV ever! I do high quality programming everyday! But, when I worked in daycare, I had others to cheer me on. At home, I feel like I can actually do more with the children, because the numbers are smaller. However, I definitely feel less valued.

Hi lesley! I just want to say I have been reading your posts with great interest. They are very well written and I agree with your suggestions and opinions. That is a lot coming from someone who is known to love to argue!!!
I also like your idea about the little rocking chair. I think I will pick one up for the new little girl (12 mos) starting in March. Hope you are feeling well during your pregnancy, and I hope to run into you again soon.

Natalie
post #179 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by zipworth View Post
When I worked in 'big daycare' I always felt like it was difficult to get respect from the general public for the hard work I did, and my level of education. I felt like I needed to walk around broadcasting that I was university educated. Now?? I really feel like it is hard to get respect at all. I don't plunk kids in front of the TV ever! I do high quality programming everyday! But, when I worked in daycare, I had others to cheer me on. At home, I feel like I can actually do more with the children, because the numbers are smaller. However, I definitely feel less valued.

Hi lesley! I just want to say I have been reading your posts with great interest. They are very well written and I agree with your suggestions and opinions. That is a lot coming from someone who is known to love to argue!!!
I also like your idea about the little rocking chair. I think I will pick one up for the new little girl (12 mos) starting in March. Hope you are feeling well during your pregnancy, and I hope to run into you again soon.

Natalie
Hi Natalie!
I totally agree with how you felt in daycare centres, and at home I do feel like I am explaining myself to others about the value of what I do. Which is why I want to get back involved in the NSCCA and get my memberships re-activated with CCFC and CCCAA. No one is going to respect us unless we tell them why they should.
As for the rocking chair, that was discovered totally by accident. I set him in there one day because he seemed overwhelmed by everything that was going on and gave him his cup and a toy....he settled right away and then seemed to associate the chair with comfort. He's getting over a cold right now and a bout of strep throat, so he's not quite himself today...and whenever he starts to melt down he goes to the chair (himself!) and rocks it. I'm glad he found his own little corner here.
We should be back to regular playgroup in the summer time...hope to see you there!
post #180 of 733
Quote:
Originally Posted by wednesday View Post
Just want to note, "inconvenience" is not the reason I expect to pay less to a care provider I drop off to, than to a care provider in my home.

Working parents who can afford to pay top-dollar nanny rates, do so for the very reason of having control over the situation, having the care provided in their own residence, on their terms,

That's one of the reasons I do not want to work in people's homes (besides the fact that I have my own kids at home). When I used to work in families' homes, some of them (depended o nthe family, really) asked me to fold laundry (including mom's and dads' clothing, not just kids'), etc. I was happy to clean up after the children, but I do not hire myself out as a housekeeper.

If I have time to do housework, I'd much prefer folding my own laundry and doing my own dishes, IYKWIM.
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