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That weird thing they do - Page 2

post #21 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by alisaterry View Post
I'm LDS (Mormon) if anyone has any questions.
Me too ... so fire away and DW and I will see what we can do to answer...

ETA: The Church has two main websites: www.lds.org (which is the official website of the Church) and www.mormon.org (which is a website designed for nonmembers with basic questions on worship and doctrinal beliefs).
post #22 of 838
Pagan Mama (Roman Reconstructionist) here. I love talking to people about our faith. I'll start, no I am NOT Wiccan .
post #23 of 838
Two questions: LDS mamas, can you tell me about the "garment" that I've been told Mormons wear? Does everyone wear one, and where do you buy them?
post #24 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by ledzepplon View Post
Two questions: LDS mamas, can you tell me about the "garment" that I've been told Mormons wear? Does everyone wear one, and where do you buy them?
It is a sacred undergarment. Not everyone wears one ... it is only members that have been through a temple and it is a symbol of the covenants that we make in the temple. There are "distribution centers" throughout the world where things such as scriptures, teaching materials, Church videos/DVDs, etc., including garments can be bought.

There is an article on lds.org entitled "The Temple Garment: An Outward Expression of an Inward Committment" by a member of the Quorum of the Seventy (which is kind of like a Catholic cardinal in terms of Church hierarchy) which explains - much better than I have - what the garment is and what it represents.

There is also this from the preparatory class the members take as they prepare to enter a temple:
Quote:
"The garment provides a constant reminder of the covenants you have made in the temple. You should treat it with respect at all times. You should not expose it to the view of those who do not understand its significance, and you should not adjust it to accommodate different styles of clothing. When you wear it properly, it provides protection against temptation and evil. Wearing the garment is an outward expression of an inward commitment to follow the Savior."
Hope this answers your question.
post #25 of 838

bs"d

A couple other Mormon questions:

Why do only men have the "priesthood"? Do you think that it will be revealed (thought a new doctrine given by the prophet, I guess) that women may receive the priesthood in the future that way people of color were allowed to receive it in the '70s? BTW, I am not trying to bait you or criticize the LDS church, just curious about your thoughts.

Why do LDS people collect nativity sets? I read about that here, so I really know nothing about that one.

Why does BYU, for example, have such high modesty standards (I have heard that women there must wear skirts below the knee, etc.), but it does not seem like many women/girls keep to these standards in many wards? I am just going off my very limited experience here, so if I'm totally off about other LDS women's modesty just let me know. I guess I am just wondering if these standards are supposed to be for all women, but not everyone is up to it (which is understandable), of if people are just supposed to do this for "purity" or some such during college life.

Do women go on missions when they are single? I always seem to only see male missionaries.

I hope none of this was offensive or pushy. I am just curious about some things I've seen or heard through some LDS friends when I was younger.
post #26 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
A couple other Mormon questions:

Why do only men have the "priesthood"? Do you think that it will be revealed (thought a new doctrine given by the prophet, I guess) that women may receive the priesthood in the future that way people of color were allowed to receive it in the '70s? BTW, I am not trying to bait you or criticize the LDC church, just curious about your thoughts.
The best and simplest answer I can give you for the first part of your question ("Why do only men have the "priesthood"?") is that that is what G-d revealed to Joseph Smith (according to our belief). I know that that sounds like a cop out, but that's pretty much it. As for the second part ... you never know. It's possible. That - in my opinion - is one of the greatest things about belonging to a religion that believes in modern revelation from G-d and not just relying on revelation that is 1000s or 100s of years old or even a decade old: you recieve "up-to-date" (for lack of a better term) and "current" guidance about what is going on in the world and what is the best way to act in accordance with that. This is not to say that we don't think for ourselves, but having some guide posts along the path of life that are constantly updated is certainly nice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
Why do LDS people collect nativity sets? I read about that here, so I really know nothing about that one.
I don't know that that one is LDS-specific, per se. My mom and grandmother only have one each ... but then again, I grew up outside of Utah and my family are "California Mormons" and not "Utah Mormons" and there is actually a very distinct LDS-cultural difference there ... I don't mean to say that there are doctrinal differences between the two states, but there are definite everyday cultural differences, much like a New York Irish Catholic is different from a Boston Irish Catholic (to use a tired stereotype )

Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
Why does BYU, for example, have such high modesty standards (I have heard that women there must wear skirts below the knee, etc.), but it does not seem like many women/girls keep to these standards in many wards? I am just going off my very limited experience here, so if I'm totally off about other LDS women's modesty just let me know. I guess I am just wondering if these standards are supposed to be for all women, but not everyone is up to it (which is understandable), of if people are just supposed to do this for "purity" or some such during college life.
As a private institution of the Church, BYU tries to uphold standards of modesty that are espoused by the Church. Thus they have the "Honor Code." Which is - when you get down to it - not much different than similar dress and honor codes in private schools across the nation. (BTW, women don't have to wear skirts all the time on campus, jeans, shorts and pants are fine ... just as long as they conform to the Dress Code.) As for why these standards seem to be abandoned in various wards... I think your assessment is fairly accurate. "I guess I am just wondering if these standards are supposed to be for all women, but not everyone is up to it" seems to be the best way to put it. (As a side bar: DW and I are currently in Provo, Utah for school, though I am not at BYU - for a variety of reasons (cost being one of them) but also because one part of the Honor Code reads as follows:

Quote:
If worn, moustaches should be neatly trimmed and may not extend beyond or below the corners of the mouth. Men are expected to be clean shaven; beards are not acceptable.
This is something I don't agree with (small wonder why ) and so I go to UVSC in Orem.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
Do women go on missions when they are single? I always seem to only see male missionaries.
Yes. DW served a mission in Southern France (the Marseille/Carcassonne/Nice/Antibes region). They can go when they turn 21 (for males it is 19-26), however it is not required. For males, formal, full-time missionary work is seen as a "responsibility of the priesthood" and so between the ages of 19 and 26 a male will recieve a formal invitation to serve a mission. So, long answer to a short question, that's why you see more male missionaries than female ... but they are out there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BinahYeteirah View Post
I hope none of this was offensive or pushy. I am just curious about some things I've seen or heard through some LDS friends when I was younger.
No, not offensive at all. That's what this thread is for, opening dialogues between members of different religions that are curious about the "oddities" in others' modes of worship so no offense taken and feel free to ask whatever you want and - I for one - will try to answer any and all questions to the best of my ability, and (as I tell my seventh graders) if I can't answer your question immediately, I'll do some research and give you an answer as soon as I can find one. But no ... you're questions are great. Its nice to be able to have an environment like this to clear up misunderstandings and misinformation (of which there is a lot, and not just for the LDS faith) and answer questions, don't you think?
post #27 of 838
Quote:
Why do only men have the "priesthood"?
This is actually NCDaddy's DW - we women will never receive the priesthood because we don't need it. It's a compensatory power that puts men under obligation to do things that women already do naturally - serve others, act intuitively and lead. This is coming from a very feminist woman, mind you. I do not need the priesthood, not even to give blessings. Women in the early church placed their hands on people's heads and blessed them all the time. I don't know why they don't do it more often, but we can, with our faith alone.
post #28 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
This is actually NCDaddy's DW - we women will never receive the priesthood because we don't need it. It's a compensatory power that puts men under obligation to do things that women already do naturally - serve others, act intuitively and lead. This is coming from a very feminist woman, mind you. I do not need the priesthood, not even to give blessings. Women in the early church placed their hands on people's heads and blessed them all the time. I don't know why they don't do it more often, but we can, with our faith alone.
BEAUTIFULY said, Alicia. thanks!
post #29 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post


Hope this answers your question.
Yes, thank you!
post #30 of 838
Still wondering about challah bread!
post #31 of 838
This thread is super cool! I have nothing to ask right now, but I am lurking.
post #32 of 838
I have a very sincere question. Please no one start anything! I am genuinely curious 'cause I just dont know.

What is the signifigance of a bris? I've heard that it "brings" the baby into the family, is that true?

And can someone also explain bat mitzvah and bar mitzvah? All I know that it happens at 13 and since it was my dad that was jewish and not my mom, I got screwed out of one!

I LOVE all the info in this thread! I always wondered about the lighting of the candles and covering your eyes one......
post #33 of 838
Quote:
My question: what is the significance of dreadlocks
Please don't call them Dreadlocks. Call them locs. When people first saw them they said "my, those are dreadful" So it was morphed into dreadlocks.
post #34 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by alisaterry View Post
Still wondering about challah bread!
So anyway, around Rosh HaShanah and usually through the end of the Sukkot holiday (September to October) the khallahs are usually round "swirls" and often have raisins in them, symbolizing all sorts of things enumerated here.


In re the braided khallahs, also, besides what's mentioned in the link, the number of braids (meaning how many pieces of dough were braided) is significant ... you use two khallahs for each Shabbos (Sabbath) meal (to recall the double portion of manna received before Shabbos in the desert) and if you have two six-braid khallahs, then you have a total of 12, which recalls the lekhem ha'panim (translated usually as "showbreads," though I've never understood what the heck that was supposed to mean) in the Beit HaMikdash (Holy Temple in Jerusalem).
post #35 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shenjall View Post
And can someone also explain bat mitzvah and bar mitzvah? All I know that it happens at 13 and since it was my dad that was jewish and not my mom, I got screwed out of one!


A bar/bat mitzva means the child (13 for a boy, 12 for a girl) has reached the stage of adult obligation in the mitzvot. Meaning they are responsible for their own spiritual growth and lives.

A bar/bat mitzva is *not* a party. Though most everyone throws a party to celebrate their children reaching that age. If someone is Jewish, even if they don't have a party, they have still had their bar/bat mitzva.

FWIW I didn't have a party either. Big bashes are not my family's style. b'H.
post #36 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shenjall View Post
I have a very sincere question. Please no one start anything! I am genuinely curious 'cause I just dont know.

What is the signifigance of a bris? I've heard that it "brings" the baby into the family, is that true?



No. A bris brings the baby into the Jews' covenant with their G!d, first begun with their father Avraham (as described in the Torah, in the book of B'reisheet (Genesis) in the parsha (chapter/section) known as Lekh Lekha).



The baby's birth brings the baby into the family.
post #37 of 838
post #38 of 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by merpk View Post
So anyway, around Rosh HaShanah and usually through the end of the Sukkot holiday (September to October) the khallahs are usually round "swirls" and often have raisins in them, symbolizing all sorts of things enumerated here.


In re the braided khallahs, also, besides what's mentioned in the link, the number of braids (meaning how many pieces of dough were braided) is significant ... you use two khallahs for each Shabbos (Sabbath) meal (to recall the double portion of manna received before Shabbos in the desert) and if you have two six-braid khallahs, then you have a total of 12, which recalls the lekhem ha'panim (translated usually as "showbreads," though I've never understood what the heck that was supposed to mean) in the Beit HaMikdash (Holy Temple in Jerusalem).
Fascinating! And I love the link!
post #39 of 838
Another pagan momma here! I'll try to help feild any questions that pop up. I'm loving this thread can't think of anything to ask. I might have to ask my dh to give me some questions to toss out.
post #40 of 838
This is incredibly interesting. Thank you all for doing this!

I have a question for the Mormons.

I heard at some point in my life that Mormon men held the belief that they made their way in to heaven based partly on the good works of their wives and children, which is why the average family is so large.

Like I said, I was a kid, and dismissed it as total fallacy, btw. Just curious.
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