or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Breastfeeding › ? for mamas who breastfed and delivered vaginal
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

? for mamas who breastfed and delivered vaginal - Page 2

post #21 of 47
i had a vaginal birth in the hospital. i had my own room that DH was allowed to stay in with me and we BF. a friend of mine had medicaid and had to share a room. her DP had to go home at night and the nurses were more pushy about trying to get her dd into the nursery.

i've also heard the same about stadol--that it just makes you unable to communicate, but the pain is still there.

we were planning a home birth, but had to go to the hospital for pitocin, and i still did it without any pain meds. i would HIGHLY reccomend finding a doula. i couldn't have made it without mine. they are invaluable, and there may even be one that works on a sliding scale or even volunteer basis if money is a factor for you. (you may even be able to find one who's in training and needs the experience.)
post #22 of 47
All the L&D rooms and (separate) PP rooms were private (and tiny) at our local hospitals. We had a vag hospital birth--pitocin but no drugs. ds latched on about 20 mins after he was born (I had a pretty bad hemorrhage, so they needed to fix that first) and nursed pretty continuously after that. I roomed in with him and co-slept. dh was "allowed" to stay, though after one night of sleeping in the armchair I sent him to sleep at home the second night (he needed to go home to take care of the animals anyway, and it didn't matter to me).

The nurses left us pretty much alone, which I was grateful for--I think they saw quickly that we knew what we were doing (or SEEMED to, anyway ) and didn't try to interfere. I'm not bothered by whipping out my boob in public, and after taking off all my clothes during labor, I figured it wasn't a big deal for the nurses or anyone else to see me nursing.

You can do it! HTH
post #23 of 47
I have to agree with the other posters, stadol is worthless at managing pain. All it does is make you high-I had a shot of it at the very end of my labor with dd#2 (she came out fast and furious) and I cannot remember her birth. All I can remember is I was trying to look at the clock and then suddenly clocks where flying all over the room. We had a horrible start at breastfeeding that ultimately sabotaged our breastfeeding relationship way too early.

With my 3rd dd I had a totally med free hospital birth with midwives. It was the most wonderful experience I have ever had. I felt some empowered, actually working with my body and the pain to bring forth my daughter. I did have a room mate that time, but was there less then 24 hours and we had our privacy curtains pulled at all times.

I suggest laboring at home as long as possible, and check to see if your hospital has whirlpool tubs to labor in. That was a wonderful pain reliever for me.
post #24 of 47
Skip the stadol. Skip all of them honestly. I've have 4 births. 1 c/s, 3vbacs. 3 epi's, 1 unmedicated. I got the stadol with ds 2. I had to get up to pee. The nurses freaked out and asked me if I could walk. Maybe it's just my yesteryears, but I've driven more drunk feeling than the stadol made me.

It just makes you feel drunk. Doesn't really help for pain relief.

My last delivery was at the hospital 2 hrs total before he was born. Stay home as long as you can. I wish I would have stayed home longer. If we get pg again I'm having a homebirth with a midwife. Really. It isn't that bad.

Yeah, it hurts. It doesn't last forever, and being able to move around really helps alleviate the pain. You aren't going to be "allowed" to move around too much at the hospital. Once you get there they want you docile and on your back.
post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Poot View Post
Congrats on your doc "allowing" you to go vaginal. You want to know about Stadol? I'll tell you all about Stadol. They gave me an enormous dose of it, kept letting it run into my veins until I started hallucinating. Because of that drug I have little recollection of my first child's birth, and I have memory problems that will last me my entire life. I'm not trying to scare you, but I think you need to be given a straight education about pain meds in labor before you just go consenting to them without researching. Pain medication is not necessary, and you will have a LESS painful labor and birth if you just listen to your body, move around, and birth in a position that is best for YOU, not best for the "delivering" doctor. I had an unmedicated homebirth and it was nowhere even close to being as painful as my hospital birth. Some doctors will tell you that epidurals and other narcotic drugs have "little effect" on the baby and breastfeeding. THEY.ARE.WRONG. ALL pain killers have some detrimental effect on the newborn and their ability to breastfeed effectively. The baby needs to be as alert and awake as possible and before ANYONE does anything, that baby needs to be handed to you and nursed. No apgars, no weight or height measurements, no tests, no bath- Preferrably have your husband gently towel the baby off and hand him/her to you to nurse the moment they are born. Tell the hospital staff they need to wait.

With regards to the rooming in, I believe the majority of hospitals have that now, and even if it isn't their "policy", its YOUR child and YOUR right to have the child by your side at all times. If they hassle you, just leave. They can't chain you to the wall and force you to stay. ( Besides, you'll do much better recovering at home and not eating nasty hospital food ) When I delivered in the hospital I had a private room (well, meaning I didn't share it with another patient. It was anything but private with the endless parade of nurses and doctors coming in to check me ) Your husband will be allowed to stay with you. They had pull out beds at my hospital and my husband slept on it. I've seen them at other hospitals as well.

You seem like you are worried about privacy during breastfeeding. I agree that a newly delivered mom needs her space and should not be disturbed. You and your husband will have to be proactive at keeping people out of your room during your stay. You need to put a sign outside the door that says "Do not Disturb, Mom Breastfeeding" and "Please Knock" If you get really lucky your door will have a lock and you can use it. I had a hideous time breastfeeding my first baby in the hospital because people kept interrupting me every time I would get him latched on.

Good luck with everything. Hopefully your hospital encounter will be more humane than mine was and you will have lots of help and support. One more word of wisdom about pain meds- They just make the pain and the labor last longer. Do you really want to be in pain LONGER than you need to be? Skip the drugs- your body is completely capable of delivering a baby without them.
Mama Poot, Have I told you lately that I luuuurve you??? You sound so much like me on subjects I am passionate about.

To the OP..you can do it!
post #26 of 47
I think most mommas have had the same reply I was going to make. DD was a completely naturla hospital birth. She didn't bf right after birth because I was sorta out of it, and by the time I got my wits about me, she had been taking for observation as she was retracting...other than that, dh slept in the room with us, dd slept in my bed with me and I had a private room.

Ds' birth was not that great. I didn't have a good support team - dh wasn't able to be there and I was sort of bullied into an epidural. First I asked for demerol, like stadol, thinking it was a lesser intervention than the epi - all it did was make me loopy and out of it and less able to take the pain than I had been before I got it...don't do it! Although I don't feel "bad" about my son's medicated birth, I feel sooo great about dds natural birth.

I read "Birthing the Bradley Way" before dd's birth and knowing the checkpoints of the laboring process is what really got me through. Good luck!
post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pynki View Post
Skip the stadol. Skip all of them honestly. I've have 4 births. 1 c/s, 3vbacs. 3 epi's, 1 unmedicated. I got the stadol with ds 2. I had to get up to pee. The nurses freaked out and asked me if I could walk. Maybe it's just my yesteryears, but I've driven more drunk feeling than the stadol made me.

It just makes you feel drunk. Doesn't really help for pain relief.

My last delivery was at the hospital 2 hrs total before he was born. Stay home as long as you can. I wish I would have stayed home longer. If we get pg again I'm having a homebirth with a midwife. Really. It isn't that bad.

Yeah, it hurts. It doesn't last forever, and being able to move around really helps alleviate the pain. You aren't going to be "allowed" to move around too much at the hospital. Once you get there they want you docile and on your back.

This last statement is a generalization and certainly not true of all hospitals. Please don't let people scare you. You can go to the hospital and walk around, dance, rock, take baths, showers, ect . . . . Just like a woman having a homebirth, a woman having a hospital birth should go into it with postive birthing thoughts in her head, not fear.

I support you mama. You will do just fine.
post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PGNPORTLAND View Post
You can go to the hospital and walk around, dance, rock, take baths, showers, ect . . . .
Absolutely. Just be prepared in case you have to fight to do those normal things.

Personally, I didn't want to have to fight in labor.

-Angela
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Absolutely. Just be prepared in case you have to fight to do those normal things.

Personally, I didn't want to have to fight in labor.

-Angela
I didn't have to fight to do these things. I was encouraged and supported. Not to beat a dead horse (the dead horse being this same birth discussion I keep getting into that drives me insane : ) but not all hospital experiences involve fighting. Some are very peaceful.

pauline
post #30 of 47
I think it depends on your doctor and your nurse. Some of the nurses on L&D floors are laid back and willing to bend the rules to meet patient requests. Others are caught up in the medicalization of birth and do not allow freedom of movement.

Talk to your OB beforehand about your requests. When you check in, if the nurse rubs you the wrong way dp/dh should ask for a new nurse and be persistent about it. Knowing what to expect in labor and keeping a positive attitude, as mentioned by the pp are extremely important.

I wish you a truly peaceful hospital birth.
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by PGNPORTLAND View Post
I didn't have to fight to do these things. I was encouraged and supported. Not to beat a dead horse (the dead horse being this same birth discussion I keep getting into that drives me insane : ) but not all hospital experiences involve fighting. Some are very peaceful.

pauline
Notice I said to be prepared -in CASE- you needed to. I realize in some places there is no fight. Here there would be. I'm happy for you that in your area there isn't.

-Angela
post #32 of 47
mama don't get stadol!!! i got it with ds2 he was in the NICU after birth because moms are not supposed to get stadol if they have a chance of delivering within 2 hours because it does something to the babies lungs and they have a hard time breathing on thier own. ds was in the NICU on oxygen for a few hours. It was HORRIBLE for me. I felt so guilty. please stay far FAR away from stadol
post #33 of 47
I think this varies by hospital, but I had a private room and my husband and older child were able to room in with us too, though we chose for me to stay there by myself overnight rather than have a three-year-old running around my hospital room. The nurse was very helpful, though she was quite busy because every other mother on the floor that night had had a c-section and was therefore helpless! We checked out 36 hours after delivery.

Nealy
Mama to Thales, 12/9/02, and Lydia, 2/26/06
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamamom View Post
Mama Poot, Have I told you lately that I luuuurve you??? You sound so much like me on subjects I am passionate about.
: Aww really? You know, at the end of my 2nd pregnancy an LC and friend of mine loaned me two books- Ina May's Guide to Childbirth and another called "Effects of Birthing Practices on Breastfeeding- Protecting the Mother-Baby Continuum" . That book really opened my eyes to how modern medicine is a recipe for disaster. I kept finding myself reading things and going "Oh my god I would have never thought that XYZ would have caused a problem but it sure did!" ( in regards to my first birth ). OP if you see this, see if you can find a copy of that book. It should be required reading for anyone giving birth anywhere other than at home, IMO.
post #35 of 47
I gave birth in a UK hospital. I did have a private room, but dh was not allowed to room in. The rooms that were not private still had a curtain you could pull around your area for privacy. Most hospitals in the US ususally have the privacy curtain for each bed.
post #36 of 47
And like another poster said, just because I was in a hospital didn't mean I coldn't move. I had a midwive, birthing ball, chair, tub, I could move and was encouraged to be in any position I wanted. I didn't get an IV or any other drugs or hooked up to any machines at all.
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steady101 View Post
And like another poster said, just because I was in a hospital didn't mean I coldn't move. I had a midwive, birthing ball, chair, tub, I could move and was encouraged to be in any position I wanted. I didn't get an IV or any other drugs or hooked up to any machines at all.
But again. That was in the UK, not the US. THere is a VAST difference in birthing culture between the two.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PGNPORTLAND View Post
This last statement is a generalization and certainly not true of all hospitals. Please don't let people scare you. You can go to the hospital and walk around, dance, rock, take baths, showers, ect . . . . Just like a woman having a homebirth, a woman having a hospital birth should go into it with postive birthing thoughts in her head, not fear.

I support you mama. You will do just fine.
It's not a generalization. It's my experience, and the experience of other women in my area that I know. Some people have lovely hospital births. MANY don't. Being prepared for that eventuality isn't bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PGNPORTLAND View Post
I didn't have to fight to do these things. I was encouraged and supported. Not to beat a dead horse (the dead horse being this same birth discussion I keep getting into that drives me insane : ) but not all hospital experiences involve fighting. Some are very peaceful.

pauline
Pauline. I'm betting my your name you're in Portland. Isn't the PNW known for being fairly crunchified and liberal in birth circles? Isn't it possible that your experience is the exception, and not the rule?
post #38 of 47
Don't worry! You'll do great! Not all hospitals are horrible!

I think it really depends on the hospital and the particular nurses on staff at that time.

I had both my boys in a hospital - both were medically necessary inductions with pitocin. I had no pain meds. One labor was 30 hours long, the other was 4 hours.

My insurance only paid for a shared room, but with both births I really lucked out and was the only one birthing at the time, so my shared room was private!

My partner was allowed to stay the night - they had a nifty reclining chair/cot for him to sleep on. Baby slept with me in the hospital bed.

The nurses were horrible the first time - I was young (19), and I think they were "punishing" me, if you will.
The second time I was 25 and there was none of that punishing attitude - and a whole different batch of nurses. The nurses were so great the second time! They left us alone at night and didn't bat an eye about me having the babe sleep in the bed with me. They also applauded me for not circ-ing and didn't even give me a hard time about refusing eye goop, Hep. shot, vit. K, etc.

Neither time was I asked to be confined to a bed. I walked, showered, birth-balled, you name it! They even had an external fetal monitor that was remote - so it could be strapped on with a big cloth band and you could walk around - no wires! But I refused it anyway!

Both times, my decision to BF was strongly supported, and had I needed it, there was an LC who popped in occasionally.

The only thing I would change, was there was no tub. Although, I think they got one shortly after my time there.

Have a really good birth plan written, make lots of copies. Check out where you're birthing - it will help if you can see some familiar faces when your special day arrives!!

Good luck to you! You'll be fine, whatever way it goes!

ETA: I'm in Vermont, for what it's worth...
post #39 of 47
Hospital births are not always so bad. Both of mine were wonderful experiences that I remember and cherish. Just be sure to talk to your hospital and doctor before hand. Get it all out there, plan what you can, and when you get to the hospital, you (your husband) can always say, "we'll we went through this beforehand and we were told, "x, y, z". We agreed before hand that I wouldn't be the one standing up for us, he would be.


Private room/HMO:
I had HMO insurance and a private room for my first daughter's birth-that was 5 years ago. I got a private labor and delivery room with baby #2 8 months ago and was moved to a recovery room where we all stayed together and moving the baby to the nursery was never suggested. Medication was not offered (I asked for it, my husband did his best to encourage me to not get it, the nurse didn't intervene--I went for it--my choice).

Breastfeeding:
I don't remember them ever acting like not breastfeeding was even an option. They helped me (even changed a few diapers) and then checked on us.

Privacy:
You have to stand up for yourself. After not sleeping and getting no longer than 45 minute intervals-we put up a sign on our door (after talking to the nurse) to ask people not to come in unless it was truly necessary.

Non-medicated birth in a hospital:
I had the most wonderful nurse in the hospital who supported us through 12 hours of non-medicated labor. She filled the tub for me, got me a birth ball, massaged my back, complimented my husband on how well he was supporting me, never offered pain relievers, and never once made me stay in bed. I got a hep lock upon check-in and was able to have the birth experience I communicated. I didn't make anything else an option-it just was what it was and I was given a fabulous nurse and have a fabulous husband who was my voice.

Suggestions:
Know what you want, do your background research, communicate what you want, and if they offer otherwise, just listen and say, "no, we want to do it this way." This always works for me-it's not combative, it's assertive, and you'll likely get what you want. This got me a wonderful nurse, stopped the nurses from following my doctor's orders to induce labor (this was at an earlier appt.--but it was the nurses I talked to who went to bat for me), and left me with pride that things weren't just done to me.
post #40 of 47
I had a semi-private room (which means I had one roommate at a time). I had two other new moms in my room when I was in there (all of 2 days) and we all three were BFing. I don't think it was ever mentioned that anything else was an option. I don't remember being asked if I was going to breast or bottle feed - it was just assumed I'd be BFing all along, I think. My L&D nurse was the one who helped us get latched on and showed us a couple of holds after her initial latch on right after birth.

There's a cloth curtain style partition between roommates. I have no idea what my second roommate looked like - she could have been purple with green polka dots for all I know. I stayed in my section with the curtains closed or was out walking the halls with my DH and/or the babe.

DH was not allowed to stay the night, but he was allowed to be there much later than "visitor's hours." No one ever told him he had to go, or anything, but my one very inconsioderate roommate the second night had to be told her SO, brother and father (??? odd, right? No women wanted to stay, but three men did?) could not stay the night when she wasn't in a private room.

Write up a birthplan. Tell them what you hope for. You don't have to assume hospital birth = medicated birth. Tell them in writing you want to BF and that you may need help doing it - that's what the lactation consultant is there for!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Breastfeeding
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Baby › Breastfeeding › ? for mamas who breastfed and delivered vaginal