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January 2007 Book Challenge - Page 3

post #41 of 237
Well, I've finished my first two of the year

#1 - Mothering Your Nursing Toddler (Rev Ed) - Norma Jane Bumgarner

It was an easy read, more reassuring than any new info, although the part on biting was timely . That being said, the part on working mothers did make me a bit uneasy as this first week back at work full time has been a bit rough.

#2 - Spirit of the Village: A Maui Memoir - Jackie Pias Carlin

I'm a sucker for the 'every person has a story to tell' genre of memoirs but this one was not to my taste. I found the writing flat and disorganized. The only saving grace was that I don't know much about the lives of immigrant Filipinos living in camps created by the pineapple/sugar cane companies in Hawaii, so that was interesting. However, I had to push myself to finish it.



I've started rereading the biography of Eustace Conway by Elizabeth Gilbert and am reminded how fascinating he is. Looking forward to getting further into this one.
post #42 of 237
ok... back.... I've resorted to reading the books that I got dh for Christmas and his birthday.

#2: The Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer
A quick read, and a great addition to the series.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...86849567&itm=1
Quote:
One hundred centuries ago, humans and fairies battled in a fierce turf war. When the fairies realized that their struggle was futile, they tucked ethereal tail and retreated underground. Only the demons lingered above, plotting to regroup and resume the attack against humans. But their plot went asunder and these would-be revolters wound up in Limbo, where they stewed for 10,000 years. The spell that holds them, though, is degrading; threatening the perilous peace. Only Artemis Fowl, teenage criminal mastermind, and his old comrade, Captain Holly Short, stand between his people and a violent demonic invasion.
#3: Here, There be Dragons by James A Owen
Another quick read, many literary and mythological references. Good for those of us who enjoy Arthurian legends and a rolicking adventure. Read this today and thoroughly enjoyed.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...16912279&itm=2
Quote:
An unusual murder brings together three strangers, John, Jack, and Charles, on a rainy night in London during the first World War. An eccentric little man called Bert tells them that they are now the caretakers of the Imaginarium Geographica -- an atlas of all the lands that have ever existed in myth and legend, fable and fairy tale. These lands, Bert claims, can be traveled to in his ship the Indigo Dragon, one of only seven vessels that is able to cross the Frontier between worlds into the Archipelago of Dreams.
post #43 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by frogguruami View Post
I would like to join. My realistic goal is to read on book a month. BUT I would be really happy to get through one a week!!!! I don't read fiction so sometimes it takes a little longer to read some of the book I pick up, LOL.
Right there with you! A book a month is doable...usually.

So far I've read:

"Kids Are Worth It" Babara Coloroso. Great parenting book. The author is amazing.

"Leaving the Saints" Martha Beck. Her personal story of her spiritual journey which led her to leave the LDS Church.

I just started "Muhammad : a biography of the prophet" Armstrong, Karen. Title is self explanitory.
post #44 of 237
I haven't been listing my reads for many months, but am starting the new year with The Village Voice's Film Guide:50 Years of Movies from Classics to Cult Hits.
post #45 of 237
Yeah! This thread is off to a great start. Glad to see so many new and returning readers.

"The Rug Merchant" by Meg Mullin

This was a great book - about an Iranian rug merchant in New York and his wife still in Iran. Very well done.
post #46 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by kofduke View Post
Hey guys - can anyone think of a new way for us to post synopses, since the amazon reviews are too long now? Is there a place they tend to be shorter? I'd hate to have to click on a link for every book that comes up in this thread, but I can't think of another way to do it...

I am just going to stop listing quotes. I don't have time to figure out if it's 100 words or not.
post #47 of 237
I'm in! I'll put myself down for 25 books over the year, since I have way too much reading for work to do. Am halfway through my second of the year

#1 The Right Address -- refreshingly light but not a great book. The characters are two-dimensional and the plot is atrocious. The actual scenes are fun, though, and since I love chick-lit/fashion/bitchy women stuff, it was pleasant enough. And, I got it for $1 at a going-out-of-business used book store.

#2 Beyond the Rainbow Bridge -- a nice, short, easy one.

Next on my list is The Omnivore's Dilemma.
post #48 of 237
i hope folks keep posting reviews of their own or from a web site, it makes it way easier to judge if i might like it :-))
post #49 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by konamama View Post
i hope folks keep posting reviews of their own or from a web site, it makes it way easier to judge if i might like it :-))
My blog is dedicated to reviews of the books I read, so I'll post links of everything I read for you
post #50 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by konamama View Post
i hope folks keep posting reviews of their own or from a web site, it makes it way easier to judge if i might like it :-))
I agree! I really value other MDCers' opinions of books. Even if it's just a few words about whether you loved it or it was just okay, that's enough to help me prioritize my huge to-read list!
post #51 of 237
I'm with you snozzberry - I don't care about the amazon descriptions but I am interested in MDC'ers reactions and opinions of the books.
post #52 of 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
I'm with you snozzberry - I don't care about the amazon descriptions but I am interested in MDC'ers reactions and opinions of the books.
Glad I'm not alone! Several times now I've seen one of my to-read titles come up in this thread with a less-than-glowing review, so it helps me to prioritize them lower. And sometimes something I've never heard of gets a great review!

Have I mentioned how much I love this thread? :
post #53 of 237
I'm not setting a goal this year. I read 74 books last year.

1. Two Little Girls in Blue by Mary Higgins Clark

It wasn't as good as her others so I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who isn't already an MHC fan.

2. The 5th Horseman by James Patterson

The 5th book in his Women's Murder Club series - very good.

1. Two Little Girls in Blue by Mary Higgins Clark 2. The 5th Horseman by James Patterson

Jenn
post #54 of 237
I have a low goal for this year - 2 books a month!

#1 Eragon - I got this book because dh and I both like fantasy and we could both read it together and then go see the movie! I liked it. It was pretty easy to tell that it was written by someone who was not a very experienced writer. It's full of cliches in certain areas and then he over reaches in other areas and the story is just too fantastic. It's definitely at a younger level, but the story was still interesting. I am planning on reading the next book. I know that's not a glowing review - I wasn't crazy about it, but I did enjoy it.
post #55 of 237
#2 The Caesarean by Michael Odent

Michael Odent has an even-handed reasonable approach to birth and explaining caesareans. This is more research for my vbac, and I found it informative and interesting. One thing that really intrigued me was his statement that places in the world that have higher c-section rates tend to have more violent cultures, for example, he said in Amsterdam there is a very low c-section rate and in Sao Paolo there is a very high c-section rate. Which country would you feel safer walking the streets at night? His take on how losing the moments after birth to bond and establish breastfeeding are crucial to our learning to love others and ourselves. Supports my thoughts about "Peace on Earth Begins With Birth"
If you like to read about birth, etc, I would recommend it.
post #56 of 237
*subscribing* Aha - I just found this thread. I used to post regularly in Jan/Feb last year. My goal was 100, and I made it, but just barely (103). Here were the books I read, sorted by star rating. I counted all adult (and YA) fiction and some genres of non-fiction (but not others, e.g. reference, cookbooks). This year I'm also shooting for 100 but hoping to get in more fiction.

#1: Too Many Cooks by Rex Stout (mystery, 1938)

This is the 5th book with the brilliant gourmet-food-and-orchid-obsessed, detective Nero Wolfe. I'm reading them in order, which leaves 30- or 40-something more to go - what a joy knowing there are so many more to read - I'm the kid in the candy store. I enjoyed Too Many Cooks, but I haven't yet met a Nero Wolfe mystery I didn't. It wasn't quite as good as Fer-de-Lance or The League of Frightened Men though, but it was interesting to see the agoraphobic Wolfe so uncomfortable solving a mystery outside his house.

Next up is Natasha.
post #57 of 237
#4 Fablehaven by Brandon Mull and Brandon Dorman

A YA fiction book... I really liked it and am looking forward to reading more by these authors.
post #58 of 237
Oh, I have to join in this too! I'm going to set a goal of 100 books. I was trying to figure out how many books I should set a goal for, but I was spending too much time trying to figure it out- so 100 is it for me. We'll see if that's realistic by the end of the year, and then I'll know what number to choose for next year!

So right now, I am a student of the classics and I'm reading Laddie by Gene Stratton-Porter, the Lonesome Gods by Louis L'Amour, A Thomas Jefferson Education by Oliver van DeMille and Merchant of Venice by Shakespeare.
post #59 of 237
RiceMomma - Have you read Climbing Parnassus? If you like TJE, I think CP might be your cup of tea.
post #60 of 237
Book #1 down, finally. "Helen of Troy" by Margaret George. It was really good, very detailed and real feeling. She is very good at bringing her characters to life.

About Eragon, I agree that it is a simple read. I really enjoyed it as a light read, like I think of many romance books. I know that I read the second one, but don't really remember if it was better. I liked that the auther was homeschooled and young when he wrote it as a good selling point to my son though

Off to look for a new book now.



#1 Helen of Troy
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