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Healing the Gut Tribe--January 2007 - Page 9

post #161 of 390
No, he's not.

Caedmyn is right, you can get two separate sugar free preparations of Nystatin.
post #162 of 390
So if I am detoxing and getting enough to drink, I shouldn't be constipated, right? Alas, for the last two days, that seems not to be the case. SA should be arriving today. That should help, but I really like to know that my body can do it on its own, ya know?
post #163 of 390
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshine View Post
So if I am detoxing and getting enough to drink, I shouldn't be constipated, right? Alas, for the last two days, that seems not to be the case. SA should be arriving today. That should help, but I really like to know that my body can do it on its own, ya know?
If your gut flora is adjusting that can cause constipation. Kombucha caused a bit of constipation for me.
post #164 of 390
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know if there are any studies on whether eating low levels of known allergens which don't cause obvious symptoms actually causes an immune response or not? Bluets, can you find anything? (Sorry to keep bugging you but you always seem to be able to find something!)
post #165 of 390
ask and you shall receive....

Importance of gastrointestinal ingestion and macromolecular antigens in the vein for oral tolerance induction

Wakabayashi et al. 2006. Immunology. 119(2): 167...

Oral administration of a certain dose of antigen can generally induce immunological tolerance against the same antigen. In this study, we showed the temporal appearance of ovalbumin (OVA) antigens in both portal and peripheral blood of mice after the oral administration of OVA. Furthermore, we detected 45 000 MW OVA in mouse serum 30 min after the oral administration of OVA. Based on this observation, we examined whether the injection of intact OVA into the portal or peripheral vein induces immunological tolerance against OVA. We found that the intravenous injection of intact OVA did not induce immunological tolerance but rather enhanced OVA-specific antibody production in some subclasses, suggesting that OVA antigens via the gastrointestinal tract but not intact OVA may contribute to establish immunological tolerance against OVA. Therefore, we examined the effects of digesting intact OVA in the gastrointestinal tract on the induction of oral tolerance. When mice were orally administered or injected into various gastrointestinal organs, such as the stomach, duodenum, ileum, or colon and boosted with intact OVA, OVA-specific antibody production and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were significantly enhanced in mice injected into the ileum or colon, compared with orally administered mice. These results suggest that although macromolecular OVA antigens are detected after oral administration of OVA in tolerant-mouse serum, injection of intact OVA cannot contribute to tolerance induction. Therefore, some modification of macromolecular OVA in the gastrointestinal tract and ingestion may be essential for oral tolerance induction.


http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/lin...7.2006.02418.x


Actually, it looks like a very good read because it gives a good bit of background about the current thinking of food allergens. EMAIL me if you want the pdf as it is probably restricted access.
post #166 of 390
Oral tolerance and its relation to food hypersensitivities

Chehade M, Mayer L. JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY 115 (1): 3-12 JAN 2005 Review article

The gastrointestinal tract is the largest immunologic organ in the body. It is constantly bombarded by a myriad of dietary proteins. Despite the extent of protein exposure, very few patients have food allergies because of development of oral tolerance to these antigens. Once proteins contact the intestinal surface, they are sampled by different cells and, depending on their characteristics, result in different responses. Antigens might be taken up by Microfold cells overlying Peyer's patches, dendritic cells, or epithelial cells. Different cells of the immune system participate in oral tolerance induction, with regulatory T cells being the most important. Several factors can influence tolerance induction. Some are antigen related, and others are inherent to the host. Disturbances at different steps in the path to oral tolerance have been described in food hypersensitivity. In this review we provide an overview of oral tolerance and cite data related to food hypersensitivity wherever evidence available.


We don't have immediate access to this one but if EMAIL me if you are interested in reading more.
post #167 of 390
Immune privilege in the gut: the establishment and maintenance of non-responsiveness to dietary antigens and commensal flora

Iweala and Nagler. Immunological Reviews Volume 213 Issue 1 Page 82 - October 2006

Immune privilege in the gut is the result of a complex interplay between the gut microbiome, gut luminal antigens, and the intestinal epithelial barrier. Composed of both physical and immunochemical components, the intestinal barrier secretes immunoregulatory mediators that promote the generation of tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, phagocytic innate immune cells characterized by 'inflammatory anergy', and regulatory cells of the adaptive immune system. Innate immune cells mediate controlled transepithelial transport of luminal antigens as far as the mesenteric lymph nodes, where the intestinal and peripheral immune systems intersect. This promotes the generation of adaptive regulatory lymphocytes that actively suppress effector cell responses against gut luminal antigens and flora. The net result is the generation of tolerance to dietary antigens and the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Dysregulation of this complex immunoregulatory network leads to diseases such as food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. Future therapies for these diseases will likely involve the functional restoration of the barrier and regulatory cell functions at the epithelial/luminal interface.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi...X.2006.00431.x

Again, another review article... I have access to the full article and it looks like an interesting read. EMAIL me if you want a peek.
post #168 of 390
and another review article:

Food allergies: Prevalence, molecular characterization, and treatment/prevention strategies

Lee and Burks ANNUAL REVIEW OF NUTRITION 26: 539-565 2006

A significant proportion of the population is either affected by or concerned about food allergy. Our knowledge about food allergens and how they stimulate the immune system has increased dramatically over the past decade. However, reasons for the increased prevalence of food allergy are not clear. The diagnosis of food allergy requires that the patient and caregivers examine all foods for the presence of potential allergens in order to prevent inadvertent ingestion and further reactions. Fortunately, many children develop tolerance to allergenic foods after a period of dietary elimination. Various immunotherapy approaches are under investigation to alleviate or prevent food-induced reactions in those who have persistent food allergies.

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2276/doi....061505.111211

not sure if that link will work if you're not in the IU network.

this one has at least defined the varying presentations of food allergy (IgE-mediated vs cell-mediated) and food intolerance. haven't read the whole thing yet but it looks like another promising read.
post #169 of 390
Thread Starter 
Thanks, bluets! Now what the heck do they say (can you translate into plain English?)!
post #170 of 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
Thanks, bluets! Now what the heck do they say (can you translate into plain English?)!
give me a few days... i'm in the middle of an office move and i'm working on the daycare newsletter at home. in the meantime, feel free to google words you don't know and give us a report
post #171 of 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
Thanks, bluets! Now what the heck do they say (can you translate into plain English?)!
ditto. too many years of baby brain since grad school...
post #172 of 390
Thread Starter 
I think I more or less understand what the abstracts are saying, but I don't think they answer my question, unless I'm just missing something. As near as I can tell, the first one is comparing injection vs. ingestion in the development of oral tolerance (or lack of it). The others seem to be talking about how oral tolerance works. The last one might possibly have some more useful information in the full text, I can't really tell.
post #173 of 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
I think I more or less understand what the abstracts are saying, but I don't think they answer my question, unless I'm just missing something. As near as I can tell, the first one is comparing injection vs. ingestion in the development of oral tolerance (or lack of it). The others seem to be talking about how oral tolerance works. The last one might possibly have some more useful information in the full text, I can't really tell.
Caedmyn, my uneducated observation from reading others' experiences and articles on allergies on the net is that even small amounts of an allergen cause a person's immune system to react. You may not see obvious outward signs, but the immune system is on alert and activated. Many people say they can tolerate their allergen in small doses, but only with breaks in between. Otherwise, they get a build-up response. So, a small dose one day does nothing (outwardly), but 3 days in a row finally produces observable reactions. In either case, their immune system is responding, but the reactions don't appear until later. Also, some people have reported that their responses (over years) became progressively worse, so that, at one time, they could tolerate small amounts, but constant exposure (presumably) caused them to react immediately even to single doses.
post #174 of 390

Yogurt question

Today I got my jar of yogurt out of the fridge... then left it out for about 5 hours before I remembered and put it back in the fridge. It's 75 degrees in here. Do you think my yogurt is bad or should I still eat it?

-Afton
post #175 of 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
I think I more or less understand what the abstracts are saying, but I don't think they answer my question, unless I'm just missing something. As near as I can tell, the first one is comparing injection vs. ingestion in the development of oral tolerance (or lack of it). The others seem to be talking about how oral tolerance works. The last one might possibly have some more useful information in the full text, I can't really tell.
You are pretty much right on. I'm not seeing the answer to your actual question, at least not here. Maybe in the full text. But, I don't know of anything that has been done to date that isn't a very medicalized study.
post #176 of 390
I tried really hard to get my doc to order a stool analysis today, but no go. And he asked me what leaky gut was. I didn't have enough impressive enough sounding science to roll of the tip of my tongue to make a true case of it. I have to jump through a few more of his hoops before we get there (like see a dermatologist). Sigh. However I do have an appointment with a homeopath in a bit over 2 weeks. I was almost tempted to ask if he treats leaky gut or similar, but then I didn't.
post #177 of 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshine View Post
I tried really hard to get my doc to order a stool analysis today, but no go. And he asked me what leaky gut was. I didn't have enough impressive enough sounding science to roll of the tip of my tongue to make a true case of it. I have to jump through a few more of his hoops before we get there (like see a dermatologist). Sigh. However I do have an appointment with a homeopath in a bit over 2 weeks. I was almost tempted to ask if he treats leaky gut or similar, but then I didn't.
this might be helpful to haul around with you: http://www.thorne.com/media/intestin...rmiability.pdf
post #178 of 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluets View Post
this might be helpful to haul around with you: http://www.thorne.com/media/intestin...rmiability.pdf
How awesome are you. Thanks bunches.
post #179 of 390
there's actually a few more on that website that are relevant but i can't remember which issues... if you do an advanced google search on "intestinal permeability" and restrict it to the thorne.com domain, you may be able to get a few more articles to lug around.

keep in mind that this is an ALTERNATIVE medicine journal, so your mainstream docs might still brush it off.
post #180 of 390
Moonshine-just keep in mind that a classical homeopath would answer "no". The idea in homeopathy is that you don't treat a disease, but the person as a whole. So a classical homeopath doesn't "treat" leaky gut any more than they treat cancer, infectious diseases or colds. That doesn't mean they don't in the end help you. It simply means that they won't likely spend alot of time on that. I don't want that to discourage you, so I just wanted to give you a heads up. In the grand scheme of things that is a small part of your picture believe it or not! I know that is why I first went to a homeopath years and years ago and we spent alot more time on which side of my body I sleep on, what weather I felt better in, and the fact that I have a huge affinity for christmas lights-lol. It was weird, but like most I experienced a pretty big shift with my remedy.

Let us know how it goes!
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