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Waldorf HS Support Thread January - Page 4

post #61 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimiharshe View Post
Well, since Jessica brought up the movies, that goes along w/my question. Do all of you do ZERO tv?
We don't do zero TV. I know the TV is not how I want to parent, but it slips in. I think the only way to honestly do zero TV is to not have it in the house, and I'm not willing to do that--I like TV for me And I would looooove to tell you that I only choose quality, educational shows for the kids. Nah, they like Kim Possible just as much as Zooboomafoo.

What I do do though is limit TV during the week. When we're humming along, the girls watch no TV M-F. They may watch TV on Saturdays and Sundays (though during football season, my need to watch the COWBOYS trumps all (oh how those 'Boys break my heart : )). On Saturdays and Sundays, I try to limit it to either a movie or 1-2 half-hour shows.

Having the TiVo has really helped, because if there's something the girls really want to watch, they know we can record it and they can watch it on their TV days. It helps.
post #62 of 230
MLW, Thanks for sharing so much! I love the idea of using fingerplays etc for end of quiet time and settling in time; I've been stumbling a bit there. And the family meeting sounds great, it would help my 5 yr old a lot to talk about the week ahead together so he knows whats coming up. Thanks again!
post #63 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
Question: what do your weekends look like? <snip> Does anyone else keep their basic rhythm even on the weekend when dp/dh is home, but just add in other activities that match the flow?
Nah. We totally relax on the weekends. We have some structure provided by Mara's ballet (she has two classes on Saturdays), and Dave usually has some sort of band practice on either Saturday or Sunday most weekends. Sometimes we get together with friends and go bowling or something fun. Or we might hit the bookstore as a family. Or this might be my day to sneak out and hang out with my sister and get pedicures I do love pedicure day with my sister!

I will say that, if I feel we haven't finished what I wanted to get done during the week, we will certainly work on a Saturday or a Sunday. I guess that's the benefit of homeschooling (and of having a Dave who sleeps late most mornings--we can get work done before he wakes up!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by konamama View Post
just wondering - when folks on this thread are speaking of "doing waldorf at home" they are talking about circle time, rhythm, crafts. are folks also offering academic subjects via a waldorf method (if kids are old enough)? <snip> and if folks do introduce formal academics do you use a waldorf curriculum? oak meadow, live education!, waldorf without walls, or piece different things together that are waldorf based OR do you take a variety of homeschooling materials and adapt it to the waldorf method.
Kona, we do academic lessons with my fourth grader (Mara) and kindy-plus with my 6yo, Daisy.

Most days I try to do some kind of warm-up activities, even if it doesn't look like what any Waldorf teacher would call "circle time." The intent is to get the kids moving, and if that's a morning nature walk whilst we sing a few seasonal songs, so be it. If that's a quick game with the beanbags (age appropriate) and a morning verse, that's cool too. Honestly, it's hard to do circle time with only three people!! And my youngest doesn't like circle time when it's just the three of us. She's much more responsive/better behaved in our homeschooling co-op's circle time than she ever is at home. I've got to respect that she wants to run around, yes, and then sit and read a book with me.

Curriculum... I put together my own with bits and pieces from:
* The Chiron Waldorf Homeschooling Intensives (week-long training up in Toronto in my specific grade--fabulous!)
* Path of Discovery
* Millennial Child (for the block schedule)
* Marsha Johnson/Waldorf Home Educators list
* Donna Simmons's Overview and grade-specific audio download

We also use the occasional worksheet (usually math practice/drill/review), and we love our Tuesday Tea Time with Ambleside Online's art appreciation prints/guidelines.

I will tell you, it took me years to be able to wrok up to piecing it together myself. The first year I had Enki grade one--the first, three-binder, two boxes of masters, horribly organized, terribly expensive, experiment from Beth and Enki. I understand it has gotten better now, but working with it taught me that no matter if you use a box curriculum or not, there's always going to be more prep than you imagined. The second year, I did PoD, Donna Simmons, Chiron (it was my first year at the Intensives). Third grade was more Chiron than anything else, and this year feels the same. I feel really in control of what's going on in our hoeschool, and unlike when I was following someone else's curriculum, I don't get surprised--I know what's coming next

OK, I've written a book LOL
post #64 of 230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderactivist View Post
Hey Guys,

Does anyone else here have two in different grades? That to me is the greatest challenge in this homeschool journey. At times, I do feel a bit like a tennis ball during our school time - we share some things, but now they are truly in different stages of childhood and I have to teach them separately.

Any input on improving this is helpful:
We always start together with a walk or movement activity. Then we often do bean bags or tongue twisters together. Then I do spend a good 40-50 minutes focused on the first grader while the sixth graderr does independent work. After lunch, I work with the sixth grader on our main lesson while the first grader plays. Then, a break. Sometimes, we get a separate art lesson - and sometimes we just don't because I'm tired of school...and there's usually some sort of art in their main lessons. I think to improve this Spring, we'll just do afternoon art block on Mondays and Fridays - when we have no other activities. Maybe then I won't beat myself up about not having art 4 days a week. (We take Weds off)



Dear Konamama-
Lucie,
It sounds to me like you are doing a great job. I too, have two different grades. My youngest is only four while my oldest is 10. I find that it is easy for me to do a lot of things together and ping pong between them for things that they need individually. I set the youngest one up with a play scene while the oldest and I work together. While the oldest is working independently, I will put on a puppet show, read a book, or whatever I need to do for the little one.

We all do handwork together, circle time, music, walks, gardening (Spring/Summer), nap/quiet time, and chores. The oldest is building things right now, and the little one helps by holding pieces together. It's really sweet. We have art or baking as our evening activity after dinner clean up before our bedtime ritual.
post #65 of 230
Thread Starter 
faerierebecca~ Really inspiring post! Thanks.
post #66 of 230
Hi all I'm new to this thread. I've been doing some digging into Waldorf and have bought AM's Seasons of Joy winter set and am getting ready to start some basic hsing w/ DS (he's not quite 3 yet). I'm drawn to Waldorf for the beauty and respect for nature and would like to at least start DS off this way. I'm wondering if anyone has any resources on developing your rhythm? Maybe some guidelines? DS is VERY *spirited* and I need some "structure" to our day so that we both know what's coming next.

I'm excited to take this next step in our lives I look forward to all the advice and support you mamas have
post #67 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
Question: what do your weekends look like? I'm hoping, especially since our Tuesday-Thursdays are prescheduled in the mornings, to keep our rhythm going on the weekends, but instead of doing more hs'ing stuff, use the expansion/contraction to do family things - like trips to the aquarium during our contraction/adventure time or roller skating and Farmer's Market during our morning excercise time. Does anyone else keep their basic rhythm even on the weekend when dp/dh is home, but just add in other activities that match the flow?
I can't kep any rythym when hubby is home.
post #68 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimiharshe View Post
Do all of you do ZERO tv?
The TV is programed to not come on before 3pm during the week. Typically the boys get so into doing other things they don't even ask for it. Even hubby is getting better about it. I realized the other day that it hadn't been on for over two days. The computers are off until they have finished their work for the day. I am starting to limit them to one hour increments after that. (hour on, hour off) After reading "Raising Your Spirited Child" I am realizign that even though K seems to be calm while on it he is actaully becoming over stimulated.
post #69 of 230
Good afternoon, mamas! I'm finally feeling almost-human. Hooray!

So, last week was a bust with all the illness and snot and all. This week is our big rededication to routine. Except we're leaving town Tuesday after we pick up Michael, spending the night in Lancaster, and taking the older two to NYC to see Mary Poppins on Broadway!!!! I know, Holy Overstimulation, but DH and I are both theater geeks and we are so, so, so excited to share this with the kids. So it will be peaceful only 4 out of 5 days here.
post #70 of 230
Hi! I am here...we are doing Kindy homeschooling right now...I just ordered our spiritual syllabus winter book by Susan Whitehead. I also like the Wynstones seasonal books and A Child's Seasonal Treasury. A lot of our homeschooling right now is just being outside... getting lots of movement watching the seasons change...

Where are you staying in Lancaster annettemarie btw? That's where I live.
post #71 of 230
Oh really? I grew up in Lancaster! My parents and my in-laws are still there. We're spending the night at my inlaws in Manheim Township.
post #72 of 230
subbing
post #73 of 230
Lucie, I just had to pop in really quickly and tell you THANK YOU for the link to the Living Values site! We downloaded the free "Peace" unit over the weekend and did a handful of the lessons over the past few days - really wonderful stuff there I think we may be getting the whole book as both dh and I really like what we've done so far. So, thanks!



Hope everyone had a wonderful weekend! Best Wishes!
post #74 of 230
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post #75 of 230
Whoops! Posted this on the December thread, LOL!
Hey, we're doing The Mitten this week too!

I hope this doesn't sound snotty or anything, but I've been revisiting my own stuff and I keep catching myself by surprise, like, "Wow! I forgot I came up with that idea. That's sort of good!!"

We had a lovely day. Some highlights were
--making a bird feeder from an OJ carton
--making a little grey felt mousie for a nature table, which we changed from Epiphany to a Winter Woods theme today
--sewing and singing together while we made the mousie
--starting "Little House in the Big Woods" as a read-aloud

I also have a dilemma I was wondering if you all could help me with. We were doing k12 : and Katie Grace has actually tested out of the kindergarten math curriculum and was doing first grade math (we were up to grouping tens and ones). She's also reading, she has all the letter sounds and short vowel sounds and we've done a few digraphs (th, sh, ch, and wh). I feel like now that we're there we can't really unring the bell. And I don't think it would make her happy if I just said, "Whoops, sorry, no more math, no more reading."

So, I think I want to come up with little "mini-main lessons"--less than an hour, including circle, lots of hands-on stuff--that still weave in what we've done and maybe pick up some new stuff, but at a much less frenetic pace. I know this is completely outside the scope of the Waldorf curriculum to have main lessons in kindergarten, but I was wondering if you all could help me come up with some ideas anyway.

Sweet story of the day--I ordered a few things from A Toy Garden (which I highly recommend; I've been nothing but pleased with them!) and one item was a new tin of stick crayons for her. She was thrilled. I don't think she's ever been so grateful in her life! She drew a beautiful rainbow and rainbow fairy and a ladybug (Sonya at The Toy Garden includes this tiny ladybug stuck to the invoice, and Katie Grace moved it to her tin of crayons) and when Daddy came home she was all over him with, "Thank you, thank you, Daddy, for my new crayons!" It was very sweet.

Oh, I also ordered the Waldorf Kindergarten Snack Book, partially for inspiration and partially because one of the ideas I had for a Seasons of Joy book was a recipe book and I wanted to make sure it wouldn't be too similar (it's not). It's a really sweet book with some great ideas and insights. AND we know the author! She's from the Susquehanna Waldorf School, which is where we went for parent-child classes when Michael was a toddler.
post #76 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
She's also reading, she has all the letter sounds and short vowel sounds and we've done a few digraphs (th, sh, ch, and wh). I feel like now that we're there we can't really unring the bell. And I don't think it would make her happy if I just said, "Whoops, sorry, no more math, no more reading."

So, I think I want to come up with little "mini-main lessons"--less than an hour, including circle, lots of hands-on stuff--that still weave in what we've done and maybe pick up some new stuff, but at a much less frenetic pace. I know this is completely outside the scope of the Waldorf curriculum to have main lessons in kindergarten, but I was wondering if you all could help me come up with some ideas anyway.
We're in a similar place in that my daughter taught herself to read this summer. Hubby and I have been joking that this is what happens when a new baby comes along and there's not as many free grown ups to read to you: you teach yourself

Like you, I've had some concerns, but I also feel like this is where she is right now and what benefit is there to homeschooling if I can't tailor it, even Waldorf homeschooling, to my individual children? So, yeah, we're doing some reading, too with a little bit of math as well, again just following her lead. I'm torn because I know there is a fear of too much, too soon but I don't want to hold her natural learning back either (I think maybe you talked about this with your son on the other thread?) and she already has a great love of reading and writing and I feel in my heart I should be encouraging. I imagine throughout her learning there will be an ebb and flow ... times we'll be going ahead of traditional Waldorf order and perhaps times we'll be slowing?

I'll be taking notes to see what others recommend to you.

Today we worked a bit on the UN Peace lessons (thanks again, Lucie!), changed out our Nature Corner, and made a Fairy paper chain from the Usborne book How to Draw Fairies and Mermaids, and did a bit of watercoloring on coffee filters (fun!) We also hung laundry together and made dinner together (bow tie pasta and red sauce with a big salad - she helped chop the veggies for the sauce & the salad and set the table for us)

All in all, a very nice day

Best Wishes!
post #77 of 230
I'm looking for a fun teacher's resource for Spanish...spanish songs and games, etc. to teach to the children....so far I've only found like workbook-y type things and children's books written in Spanish...any ideas?
post #78 of 230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluttermama View Post
I'm looking for a fun teacher's resource for Spanish...spanish songs and games, etc. to teach to the children.
http://www.naturallyyoucansing.com/books/cante.htm

I do not have this particular book, but I have a few of her others. This is one of my favorite and well used Waldorf resources. The books are beautiful with instructions on how to do finger plays, circle games, and the like. The CDs are high quality. Mary has a very lovely voice. I know you would be pleased.
post #79 of 230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post

So, I think I want to come up with little "mini-main lessons"--less than an hour, including circle, lots of hands-on stuff--that still weave in what we've done and maybe pick up some new stuff, but at a much less frenetic pace. I know this is completely outside the scope of the Waldorf curriculum to have main lessons in kindergarten, but I was wondering if you all could help me come up with some ideas anyway..
How about doing Waldorf first grade?

We love A toy Garden also. Sonya has been great to work with on several occasions. I second the recommendation to order from her. Besides that $5 playsilks. Who can beat that!
post #80 of 230
Thread Starter 
I placed an order with Bob and Nancy's and they were wonderful! Shipped everything right away, except one book is back ordered and they will send that when they get it in. They did a great job packaging it nicly with bubble wrap and the like so that my books reached me safely. Plus they included a free novel for me.
http://www.waldorfbooks.com/

They included an ad for Renewal magazine. Does anyone here get that? I think I'm going to subscribe, but I would like to hear a review. I am also interested in learning about any other Waldorf periodicals out there.

http://www.awsna.org/publicationsren.html
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