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Autism study criticism

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Anyone know anything about this?
http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/20...ield_was_p.php
post #2 of 12
I don't know much of the particulars about Wakefield's alleged conflict of interest, but I do know that others have replicated his findings since the original study. Others have also found highly elevated measles antibodies in some kids with autism.

Unfortunately many researchers still don't recognize that autism is a disorder with multiple causes and subsets, so many people assume that just because epidemiological studies don't show a link between the broad categories of "MMR vaccinated" and "autism" that this means the MMR vaccine is exonerated. You'd have to identify the right subset of the population in order to study the link, rather than lumping all autism together as one group. No one reputable has ever claimed that the MMR vaccine caused ALL autism.
post #3 of 12
Brian Deer is an ....erm...very unreliable source.
When you fact check him, most of what he says isn't even correct.

But I guess to figure out what's going on with all that, we need to dig a little deeper....again.
I'm getting really sick of having to debunk this dude's conspiracy theories. It just never ends.
Oh, well....
post #4 of 12
With all due respect, what studies have been done that replicated those results? Everything I've read shows no link whatsoever between MMR and autism. I'm not saying that vaccines have never caused autism, but the studies that have been done since then have shown no link to any form of autism. Especially considering that if I'm remembering correctly, MMR does not contain thimerasol anymore. http://www.vaccinesafety.edu/cc-mmr.htm has a lot of info regarding the link.

I have just never seen any compelling evidence that would cause me to not vaccinate, and plenty of reasons TO vaccinate. With that said, I will be delaying the MMR, but not avoiding it altogether.
post #5 of 12
post #6 of 12
MMR has never contained thimerosal. The theoretical link to autism involved a different mechanism of the virus inhabiting the gut of children with autism, and the connection with thimerosal was that previous exposure to thimerosal might have made kids predisposed to be affected this way by the MMR (I think). This is another example of how the whole vaccine/autism link is becoming muddled. Mercury/autism is a separate issue from MMR/autism. Many different mechanisms are believed to be at work here, and there are many subsets that cannot be grouped together the way that researchers are doing.

Anyway, to answer your question, I'm aware of at least one researcher who replicated Wakefield's findings and here's an article about that: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.../23/nmmr23.xml

Other researchers have found highly elevated measles antibodies in children with autism: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...5c4b97e67e6da3

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12145534

But again, I must stress, that this is not being claimed to explain ALL autism. My DD, for example, has never received the MMR shot so obviously it did not cause her problems. There are many subsets of people with autism and many different causes.
post #7 of 12
Thank you for the links. That answered my question nicely.
post #8 of 12
Here's more studies that verify the Wakefield findings by researchers who have nothing to do with Wakefield:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...t_uids=9756729

Quote:
Singh VK, Lin SX, Yang VC.
College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan
, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109-1065, USA.

Considering an autoimmunity and autism connection, brain autoantibodies to myelin basic protein (anti-MBP) and neuron-axon filament protein (anti-NAFP) have been found in autistic children. In this current study, we examined associations between virus serology and autoantibody by simultaneous analysis of measles virus antibody (measles-IgG), human herpesvirus-6 antibody (HHV-6-IgG), anti-MBP, and anti-NAFP. We found that measles-IgG and HHV-6-IgG titers were moderately higher in autistic children but they did not significantly differ from normal controls. Moreover, we found that a vast majority of virus serology-positive autistic sera was also positive for brain autoantibody: (i) 90% of measles-IgG-positive autistic sera was also positive for anti-MBP; (ii) 73% of measles-IgG-positive autistic sera was also positive for anti-NAFP; (iii) 84% of HHV-6-IgG-positive autistic sera was also positive for anti-MBP; and (iv) 72% of HHV-6-IgG-positive autistic sera was also positive for anti-NAFP. This study is the first to report an association between virus serology and brain autoantibody in autism; it supports the hypothesis that a virus-induced autoimmune response may play a causal role in autism. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16512356

Quote:
Int Rev Neurobiol. 2005;71:317-41. Links
Immunological findings in autism.Cohly HH, Panja A.
Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Mississippi 39217, USA
Quote:
MMR vaccination may increase risk for autism via an autoimmune mechanism in autism. MMR antibodies are significantly higher in autistic children as compared to normal children, supporting a role of MMR in autism. Autoantibodies (IgG isotype) to neuron-axon filament protein (NAFP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are significantly increased in autistic patients (Singh et al., 1997). Increase in Th2 may explain the increased autoimmunity, such as the findings of antibodies to MBP and neuronal axonal filaments in the brain. There is further evidence that there are other participants in the autoimmune phenomenon. (Kozlovskaia et al., 2000). The possibility of its involvement in autism cannot be ruled out. Further investigations at immunological, cellular, molecular, and genetic levels will allow researchers to continue to unravel the immunopathogenic mechanisms' associated with autistic processes in the developing brain. This may open up new avenues for prevention and/or cure of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder.
post #9 of 12
From the CDC website:

The Autism and Biopsy Study.
This study is investigating the question of whether the MMR vaccine may cause autism by a mechanism involving persistent measles virus infection in the intestine. This study involves examining the intestinal tissue of children with autism for the presence of measles virus. Results are anticipated in June 2007.


FTR, this study was supposed to have been concluded a year ago. They keep pushing back the "anticipated" date every time I check the page.
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIsland View Post
From the CDC website:

The Autism and Biopsy Study.
This study is investigating the question of whether the MMR vaccine may cause autism by a mechanism involving persistent measles virus infection in the intestine. This study involves examining the intestinal tissue of children with autism for the presence of measles virus. Results are anticipated in June 2007.


FTR, this study was supposed to have been concluded a year ago. They keep pushing back the "anticipated" date every time I check the page.
Oooh..I get it.
They just wanted to protect Merck from a flood of lawsuits related to the "autism epidemic".
They'll say the measles virus might have a causative role, or at the least a correlative one, on their own terms.
That's why they told the IOM to look at epidemiology and stay away from the biology.
post #11 of 12
post #12 of 12
And about the mercury thing, which is now "old news"..
But still...

Yes, this information is hosted on an "antivax site"...and I pretty much never, ever link to "antivax sites". But these people really did get classified information through the FOIA. And it's the real deal..

http://www.putchildrenfirst.org/chapter2.html

Quote:
"the number of dose related relationships [between mercury and autism] are linear and statistically significant. You can play with this all you want. They are linear. They are statistically significant." - Dr. William Weil, American Academy of Pediatrics. Simpsonwood, GA, June 7, 2000
Quote:
"the issue is that it is impossible, unethical to leave kids unimmunized, so you will never, ever resolve that issue [regarding the impact of mercury]." - Dr. Robert Chen, Chief of Vaccine Safety and Development, Centers For Disease Control, Simpsonwood, GA, June 7, 2000
Quote:
"Forgive this personal comment, but I got called out at eight o'clock for an emergency call and my daughter-in-law delivered a son by c-section. Our first male in the line of the next generation and I do not want that grandson to get a Thimerosal containing vaccine until we know better what is going on. It will probably take a long time. In the meantime, and I know there are probably implications for this internationally, but in the meanwhile I think I want that grandson to only be given Thimerosal-free vaccines." - Dr. Robert Johnson, Immunologist, University of Colorado, Simpsonwood, GA, June 7, 2000
Quote:
"But there is now the point at which the research results have to be handled, and even if this committee decides that there is no association and that information gets out, the work has been done and through the freedom of information that will be taken by others and will be used in other ways beyond the control of this group. And I am very concerned about that as I suspect that it is already too late to do anything regardless of any professional body and what they say…My mandate as I sit here in this group is to make sure at the end of the day that 100,000,000 are immunized with DTP, Hepatitis B and if possible Hib, this year, next year and for many years to come, and that will have to be with thimerosal containing vaccines unless a miracle occurs and an alternative is found quickly and is tried and found to be safe." - Dr. John Clements, World Health Organization, Simpsonwood, GA, June 7, 2000
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