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How many are members of HSLDA?? - Page 3

post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by meowee View Post
Whether you agree with their politics or not, they are a powerful ally to homeschoolers.
Unfortunately, this is far from the truth. In fact, HSLDA has done much to make homeschooling more regulated and to make it more difficult to homeschool in many states. This page details some of HSLDA's many abuses state-by-state: Has HSLDA Hurt Homeschooing in Various States?.

HSLDA is doing more harm to the homschooling community than anything else I can think of.
post #42 of 55
No way would I join for all the reasons above.
post #43 of 55
Nope. Not now, not ever.
post #44 of 55
No. I'd much rather spend the money on actual homeschooling supplies.
post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedWine View Post
They could have just as easily joined an umbrella school (one with no discrimination issues) and been fine as well. There are ways to bypass inconveniences without compromising integrity.
An umbrella school in the early 90s? No way. No such creature.

It was a different time then. Think back to where you were in 1993. I know where I was. I had three children and I homeschooled in a city of 55,000 people. I was the ONLY one.

There was not a whole lot of homeschool curriculum back then. You had to use public school or parochial school textbooks. School systems had no idea how to handle homeschoolers. There is no way that they would even entertain the idea of a homeschooled Special Ed child using their services. There have been huge advancements in the treatment of homeschoolers, especially those with special education children.

It isn't like now when you can go out at any time of the day and see other children and know that they are homeschooled. I used to have a Truency Officer park right down the street from my house every day. You know that I had HSLDAs number posted on the refridgerator, just in case.

And it was a whole lot easier when I started than the ones who started homeschooling in the 70s and 80s.

The government believes that it takes a village to raise a child. They aren't interested in promoting homeschooling. They are only tolerating it since it relieves overcrowding in schools. They couldn't possibly educate all the children in this country. But do not be mistaken, the government is not pro-homeschooling.

Another point in response to a post, HSLDA will not help you to get your child back into public school. That isn't their battlefield. If a homeschooler wants to put their child back into public school and the PS is resistant, it is a matter between the family and the school board. They don't pick and choose as to whom they help. They just will not help you fight your way back into the public school system.
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ustasmom View Post
An umbrella school in the early 90s? No way. No such creature.


And it was a whole lot easier when I started than the ones who started homeschooling in the 70s and 80s.

.
I started unschooling in the 80's, and used an umbrella school in California when I needed to (1986-1990, if I remember right). I will admit it was all a little more underground; we sort of felt like we might get caught (the school was 200 miles away). But I never had any problem. At all. Period. ElderSon and I were out in the community during school hours, and he came to work with me a couple days a week in a bookstore I ran. I don't remember any more questions or funny looks than I get today with the Dumplings.
post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ustasmom View Post
An umbrella school in the early 90s? No way. No such creature.
We used Laurel Springs.
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ustasmom View Post
An umbrella school in the early 90s? No way. No such creature.

It was a different time then.
Okay, so....that was then, this is now.

HSLDA was possibly a different sort of entity than it is now, as well.

In present day, I see no reason to support them.

I'm not familiar with Laurel Springs, but Clonlara has had a home education support service since 1979.
post #49 of 55
There were umbrella schools in the early 90s my cousin used one for her son when she was HSing him. It was actually a local private school that offered it.
post #50 of 55
I guess that there were umbrella schools. I sort of remember when we had a possible move to California and an umbrella school was our only option for homeschooling, other than going completely underground. We didn't take the job as neither option sounded particularly inviting.

But, isn't the real argument here not whom should homeschoolers use for protection but rather why do homeschoolers even need protection?

The reasons for homeschooling vary from family to family. Some homeschooling for religious reasons, some for secular ones. Some homeschool for neither religious or secular reasons.

Really, the decision as to who to endorse, if anyone at all, comes down to your belief system. Belief systems are all over the map. It is unclear as to the original poster's belief system, so quite inappropriate to bash one organization just because it doesn't line up with your own beliefs.

The original poster's concern is the threat of Social Services. So, maybe we could throw out options that will protect her from Social Services rather than having this argumentative banter.
post #51 of 55
From my research, HSLDA does pick and choose who they represent. Even a member is not guaranteed support from them unless their case supports HSLDA's political agenda. I could be wrong, but that's my understanding. Frankly I am personally not interested in being a member. But they likely wouldn't have me anyway as I am not a Christian. My husband is Catholic, so we are a mixed religion family. Also, they do not believe in unschooling or very relaxed homeschooling and will not help you at all if these are your issues. It seems that if you do not use a set curriculum then you don't fit their idea of a homeschooler. We are not unschoolers, well we aren't anything yet, ds is only 5!
I am in PA, with some of the strictest hsing laws and still would not join. I'm not bashing them, just not joining them. And I do wish they would stop speaking for all homeschoolers.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by ustasmom View Post
But, isn't the real argument here not whom should homeschoolers use for protection but rather why do homeschoolers even need protection?
The homeschoolers who need protection are often in noncompliance with the very laws that HSLDA helped to create. Others are dealing with educrats who are ignorant of the laws, or who think their personal belief systems should apply to everyone who raises children.

Quote:
Some homeschool for neither religious or secular reasons.
I don't follow. If someone isn't homeschooling for religious reasons, then their reasons are secular ones (not pertaining to religion).

Quote:
Really, the decision as to who to endorse, if anyone at all, comes down to your belief system. Belief systems are all over the map. It is unclear as to the original poster's belief system, so quite inappropriate to bash one organization just because it doesn't line up with your own beliefs.
It's not inappropriate to give one's opinion when asked. Obviously, one's opinion is going to stem from one's belief system.

Quote:
The original poster's concern is the threat of Social Services. So, maybe we could throw out options that will protect her from Social Services rather than having this argumentative banter.
1) Know your laws. Read the actual statutes and don't rely on HSLDA or any other organization to give accurate information. Over the past several years, I've found three errors on HSLDA's website as pertaining to state laws.

2) If you're worried about Social Services, then follow your laws. Don't let truant officers, social workers, or police in your house unless they have a warrant. When your children become of age to stay home alone, instruct them to not let these people in or give them any information if they show up at your door.
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arduinna View Post
There were umbrella schools in the early 90s my cousin used one for her son when she was HSing him. It was actually a local private school that offered it.
The umbrella school I used in the 80's was simply a private school that did not require attendance.
post #54 of 55
That sounds similar to hers, she also got a curriculum from hers and I think she did do some record keeping.
post #55 of 55
We are not members of HSLDA and don't plan to join.
We don't feel we really need them and I haven't liked what I've heard about them.
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