or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Homebirth › Birth Pool resources and information
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Birth Pool resources and information - Page 8

post #141 of 234
Where is your pool located in your house? WHich sink are you using? That is definitely not normal to only be filled a few inches after 30 minutes. Is it a 100 gal pool or a 200 gal pool? I would not use the outside spigot becuase boiled water would not be enough to warm up cold outside water. If you have everything on one floor, I would try to use the hookup for your washing machine to fill the pool - it would have better pressure and be hotter too. You can always drain it in another sink or out a door or window without the Python pump.
post #142 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by StacyL View Post
Where is your pool located in your house? WHich sink are you using? That is definitely not normal to only be filled a few inches after 30 minutes. Is it a 100 gal pool or a 200 gal pool? I would not use the outside spigot becuase boiled water would not be enough to warm up cold outside water. If you have everything on one floor, I would try to use the hookup for your washing machine to fill the pool - it would have better pressure and be hotter too. You can always drain it in another sink or out a door or window without the Python pump.
The pool will be in my living room. I have one of those split level homes where the kitchen, bedrooms and living room are upstairs and the garage, den and family room are down stairs. The washer and dryer are in the garage, so using that hookup is not an option.

I have a 100 gallon fishy pool that is going to be upstairs (I do not want to birth downstairs). I was thinking of filling the pool 1/4 of the way with cold water from outside and then the rest with hot water from the sink. At least the first 1/4 would be in the tub fast. My MW also mentioned that adding boiling water would not be enough to warm the outside water, so I figured using both sources would help somewhat.
post #143 of 234
It is supposed to be filled 1/4 way with cold wwater first anyway, so I guess using your outside hose for that will help speed things along. But, definitely make sure your water heater is turned waaaayyy up a couple weeks beforehand. At least you have a 100 gal. pool - that will help. It will probably take an hour. Mine took 30 minutes with normal water pressure.
post #144 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by StacyL View Post
It is supposed to be filled 1/4 way with cold wwater first anyway, so I guess using your outside hose for that will help speed things along. But, definitely make sure your water heater is turned waaaayyy up a couple weeks beforehand. At least you have a 100 gal. pool - that will help. It will probably take an hour. Mine took 30 minutes with normal water pressure.
Wow, 30 minutes, I must have looow water pressure. An hour or so is doable, I was worried that it would take like 3 hours with how slow if filled last night.
post #145 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by StacyL View Post
You just use regular tap water or well water - whatever your house has. you can add a cup of salt to kill germs if you want.
I've read this before on MDC and I'm curious why people think that a cup of salt in a pool will kill germs? I'm a scientist and to grow germs (bacteria) we add salt -- they need it! In fact, they'd much prefer water with a little salt than plain water! It is true that lots and lots of salt would kill germs. BUT that amount would be closer to one cup of salt in one gallon of water, not 100 gallons (or even more, I'd have to do the calculations). And then it would be so salty that any cuts on the mom (or the baby!!!) would be very, very painful.

Perhaps a little salt makes the water 'feel' smoother or better or the mom's skin wrinkles a bit less? I've not tried a WB (yet) so I don't know, but I would not believe that it kills germs.

Just don't want anyone to get the wrong idea! (and not that you should be really super concerned about germs in a waterbirth anyway...)

peace and happy birthings,
post #146 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by runner29 View Post
I've read this before on MDC and I'm curious why people think that a cup of salt in a pool will kill germs? I'm a scientist and to grow germs (bacteria) we add salt -- they need it! In fact, they'd much prefer water with a little salt than plain water! It is true that lots and lots of salt would kill germs. BUT that amount would be closer to one cup of salt in one gallon of water, not 100 gallons (or even more, I'd have to do the calculations). And then it would be so salty that any cuts on the mom (or the baby!!!) would be very, very painful.

Perhaps a little salt makes the water 'feel' smoother or better or the mom's skin wrinkles a bit less? I've not tried a WB (yet) so I don't know, but I would not believe that it kills germs.

Just don't want anyone to get the wrong idea! (and not that you should be really super concerned about germs in a waterbirth anyway...)

peace and happy birthings,
This is great information and thanks for sharing! I think it's so awesome we have MDC to share and post information
post #147 of 234
I just want to make sure. For the Python hose, I will need the hose, faucet pump and "C" flow switch open/close and that's it? http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...fm?pcatid=3922 right?

I have a utility sink that is already has threading on the outside (nothing to unscrew at the spout). The pump will screw right onto it, correct? Also, what is the "C" flow switch used for exactly?

BTW- My local Petsmart only carries the Python kit, no individual parts. I'm going to call Petco tomorrow. If not, I'll just order online.

Edited to add this diagram from Python which I found very helpful:
http://www.pythonproducts.com/repparts.html

My question is then, why do we need "C" flow switch open/close?
post #148 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by treehugginhippie View Post
I have a utility sink that is already has threading on the outside (nothing to unscrew at the spout). The pump will screw right onto it, correct? Also, what is the "C" flow switch used for exactly?

My question is then, why do we need "C" flow switch open/close?

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...fm?pcatid=3922
No, the pump will not screw onto the utility sink threads directly. You have to have a faucet adapter to attach the pump.

Perhaps you have confused part "C" for the part you REALLY need: part "G," the faucet adapter? That is what allows you to connect the pump to your sink, as shown in the illustration in "H" in the link above.

Those threads on your utility sink most likely DO disconnect, and you can see an example of this in the photos in post #104. You may have to use pliers.



I am curious where you got the notion you needed the flow switch "C" as that's never been mentioned here?

At any rate no, you don't need that part.

You only need the pump, which has a valve at the bottom that rotates into a 'closed' and 'open' position for the water flow.
post #149 of 234
StacyL, in your first post to this thread you say that adapter C is needed. On the diagram you have linked, C is the switch adapter. I know this confused me at first too.

Treehugginhippie, the Petco in my town sells everything individually, so maybe yours does too.
post #150 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzmin View Post
StacyL, in your first post to this thread you say that adapter C is needed. On the diagram you have linked, C is the switch adapter. I know this confused me at first too.
A ha! Good catch - -that explains it!

THis thread is very old, and over the years some of the links have become defunct and I've had to update them. The text naming part "C" must have been for the original link, which died about a year ago and I had to update it. Must've forgotten to change the text accordingly.

It's all fixed now in the original post #2.
post #151 of 234
Aaaaah now that makes more sense...thanks for clarifying

I called my local Petco. They only have the faucet pump...no hose extensions. They don't carry them. So, I'll just order online.
post #152 of 234
There have been several questions lately about what type of faucet adapter is needed to attach a Python pump and hose to your faucet and how to attach the faucet adapter to the faucet itself. So, I took some pictures and will try to show how the two different types work.

This info applies to either kitchen or bathroom faucets.

All faucets have a tip that must be unscrewed and removed in order to attach the faucet adapter.

One type of faucet design has internal threads when the tip is removed, and the adapter will actually screw inside the faucet itself.

Here is an example of a bathroom faucet that will have internal threads when the tip is taken off.

And here is how it looks with the tip removed:

Faucet with tip unscrewed

Now, you must make sure to take out all THREE nested parts (the metal tip, metal screen, and black rubber washer). If you do not have all three of these parts removed from the faucet, you cannot screw in the adapter!

Faucet tip parts

Now, you can screw in the plastic (or brass) faucet adapter into the faucet:

Adapter attached

Finally, you attach your Python Pump and hose to the adapter, like this:

Python Pump & Hose

And, voila! You are done! If you are not using a Python pump, you can also attach the hose (any type - garden, aquarium, rv) directly to the faucet adapter.

The other type of faucet design is one that has external threads when you remove the faucet tip.

Here is an example of a bathroom faucet with external threads when the tip is taken off.

And here is how it looks with the tip removed:

Faucet with tip taken off

Here you can see the external threads. This requires a different type of faucet adapter and it is called a "dishwasher adapter." If you are attaching one to a bathroom faucet, it is generally a 1/2" size, and if you are attaching it to a kitchen faucet it is generally a 55/64" size. They are about $3 at Lowe's or Home Depot or a plumbing store. One brand is called Danco and here is what it looks like:

Dishwasher faucet adapater

Now, you can screw the dishwasher adapter on to the faucet. You will see it does NOT go inside the faucet, since the threads on the faucet are external - it will be on the outside of the faucet when screwed on, the same way the tip looked before you took the tip off when you started.

Adapter attached

Finally, you attach your Python Pump and hose to the adapter, like this:

Python Pump & Hose

And - voila - you are done!

Here is one last photo of how it looks if you are not using a Python Drain & Fill Pump and are just using the hose. The hose just hooks directly to the faucet adapter:

Just the hose
post #153 of 234

Filtering the birth pool water?

Has anyone filtered the tap water to be used for the birth pool? I know it has chlorine in it and who knows what else. A friend mentioned an attachment that goes on the hose or a ball that goes in the water. Anyone used these?
post #154 of 234
Is there anything other than the AquaDoula that is heated??
post #155 of 234
My main concern (hopefully unwarranted) about the fishy and la bassine type blow-up pools is my 2 and 5 yos leaning over the edges and climbing in and out of the pool while I am in it and the water overflowing the sides??? any first hand experiences?
post #156 of 234
We had the three ring fishy pool and the sides were surprisingly stable. You can lean on the side without fear of collapsing it and water rushing over.
post #157 of 234
Thanks so much to all for this invaluable information. It is so incredibly helpful.

Are there adapters for bathtub faucets? Seems that one can get a lot more water out of the bathtub faucet than the sink. Is this possible to do? Any adapter parts made for this purpose?

Thanks!
post #158 of 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by treehugginhippie View Post
Has anyone filtered the tap water to be used for the birth pool? I know it has chlorine in it and who knows what else. A friend mentioned an attachment that goes on the hose or a ball that goes in the water. Anyone used these?
Chlorine from tap water will off-gas (evaporate). But I don't know how long this takes... I can't imagine that the % of chlorine would be an issue—it is, after all, safe for drinking.
post #159 of 234
I have not seen this question in this thread. Please forgive me if I am beating a dead horse.

So, how deep and wide does the pool need to be? I am a large person (1x-2x clothing size) and I am concerned that I will not be able to find a pool that is affordable and big.

Does the water have to be a certain # deep to be affective?
post #160 of 234
It should cover your belly, so only you know for sure. Usually that's at least 20 inches. As for width, that's a matter of comfort and accessibility.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Homebirth
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Pregnancy and Birth › Birth and Beyond › Homebirth › Birth Pool resources and information