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The "how to" and the benifits of water-birth discussion thread. - Page 3

post #41 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by violet
I don't like plastic in general--I know that some plastics are made with pretty toxic stuff and others aren't so bad but you really have no way of knowing. We have thoroughly washed and aired out the tub and we can run tons of water through the hose prior to the event, but we'd just never really know would we. So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Reassurance that everybody uses plastic birthing tubs and garden hoses or perhaps I should just jump in our tiny little bathtub and call it a day.

puzzled, violet
Just jump in our tiny little bathtub and call it a day.


Does the tub smell stongly of plastic? More say than a baby's plastic bath?

Don't clean with cleaning solutions that can react chemically. Just soap and water. As for the hose... If you are worries, go down to the hardware store and get a couple of meters of copper pipe. (how far is the tub from the hot tap?)

a
post #42 of 84
I'm planning for a homebirth/waterbirth any day ("due date" passed on 4 April) and was planning to use candles, along with a dim lamp across the room, for lighting. I appreciate the good words on the avoidance of point sources of light that can hurt a newborn's eyes. My midwife had planned on snuffing the candles before the birth in case she needed to use the blowby oxygen, for which I understand the necessity, but someone pointed out that blowing out candles might break the mood. Any thoughts?
post #43 of 84
I forogt that i had also used a red light bulb in one of my lamps - the light is soft, and red energy is very good - also more womb-like. Very soothing -

Also, my babies had their eyes closed for the first few minutes -

I would also like to add that camera flashes are very harsh lights.
post #44 of 84
Thread Starter 
sorry for the delay. Currently hosptalised
contribution will now be intermitent.

NO to camera flash.

Nothing wrong with asa 1000 or 1600 film.

Kill the mood, not the baby. Blow out the candels. (make it a ceromony)

Red is might not be ok for new borns. Subs use red so when they surface at night, the eyes are already adjusted to the dark.

I'm not sure about this, but look.

It may be because we see red most easily, therefore red will be "bright" to babies. I'd tend to blue or green (water colors) because the the effect seem to effect the retena less. This means that you will have to turn the lighting up to see anything.

To be honest. Diffuse white light. It may not have the same "effect" as color, but we can't ask the baby, and this is generally done for our benefit.

Hope this helps

a

BTW Who is Andrew?

a
post #45 of 84
Alexander--so sorry to hear you are out of circulation--We sure appreciate your helpful advice and hope you are feeling better. It was me who slipped on the name--I have other "andrews" in my life and I blame my pregnancy brain for the mixup. Hope you are well, V
post #46 of 84
A couple people have posted concerns about keeping the water at a pleasing temp under difficult conditions. Has anyone looked in to renting or buying one of those huge pot + butane burner combos they sell for deep frying turkeys? Seems to me you might be able to get a lot of hot water pretty quickly that way.

Gee, is THAT why they send the men to boil water in all those old timey movies?
post #47 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by kama'aina mama
Has anyone looked in to renting or buying one of those huge pot + butane burner combos they sell for deep frying turkeys?
I'd be wary of increasing the CO2 content of the room. ASAIK, in the UK, any water heating device that produces exhaust in the room is illegal.

a
post #48 of 84
Gads! Not in the room! Outdoors! These are outdoor devices. If you haven't an accessable yard or balcony... no!
post #49 of 84
Wow, thanks Alexander... and friends for all the info!

I'm having my first and planning on a waterbirth... got the tub all ready! Although not full yet. I'm due in 2 days but my midwife thought it would be more like a week. We rented a birthing tub that is 45" diameter by 3' high. It takes forever to fill up (just over 2 hours) and empties the watertank 4 times! But I can get in before it is full and it comes with a heater that will maintain the heat for up to 20 hours (i think).

Just so excited! Want my bebe to come!
post #50 of 84
bumping up for a friend
post #51 of 84

loved my water birth

I loved my water homebirth! I was so relaxed, I almost fell alseep minutes prior to pushing (actually I don't remember pushing, the contractions did it all) my 10 lb 2 oz babe out! The water and the support of my dh sitting behind me in the tub was wonderful! My bum was not sore, no tears. I do recommend having the tub set up prior to labor starting, as my labor was so fast that we were still pumping air into it and filling it with water while I birthed my babe.
post #52 of 84
We used an inflatable pool as well. While in labor filled it with garden hose outsideannd warmed with boiling water. took 30--45 minutes.
post #53 of 84
Thread Starter 
bump

a
post #54 of 84
Thread Starter 
Bumpy bumpy bumpy.

a
post #55 of 84
so the water usually starts out a bit warmer than 98 degrees usually about 103 and some moms want hotter water---
post #56 of 84
Thread Starter 
Are you asking or are suggesting, or are you reporting?

a
post #57 of 84
I think most of the moms that I work with like the water about 98' or 99'. If it gets above 100', it's often too hot for them to tolerate in very active labor. But, then again, I'm just basing that on feel. I used to measure temps until I read some of Cornelia Enning's research from Germany on waterbirth. Now, I just go by whatever the mother wants.
post #58 of 84
Thread Starter 
I would discourage you to have the water above body temperature.

Remember that the baby has no way to cool down, and it is being born into that environ. I'm sure the effect of raising the temperature above body temp cannot be good for a new-born.

a
post #59 of 84
Quote:
Gee, is THAT why they send the men to boil water in all those old timey movies?
I always wondered why boil water? I found out in an article I read that the midwives kept a pot of hot water with rags in it to put on the mothers perineum to soften up the area to help prevent tearing.

I'm sure alot of you already knew that but I didn't and thought it interesting so thought I would share.
post #60 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander
I would discourage you to have the water above body temperature.

Remember that the baby has no way to cool down, and it is being born into that environ. I'm sure the effect of raising the temperature above body temp cannot be good for a new-born.

a
While I agree that 102-103' is a bit too hot, I think it's important to remember that the temp of amniotic fluid is not 98.6 or whatever the mom's body temp is - it's often 1-2 degrees warmer than her body temp.
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