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Healing the Gut Tribe-February - Page 12

post #221 of 251
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by motocita View Post
hi everybody,

i've been reading this thread off and on for a few months now while i try to heal my 2 yo dd's gut and eczema.

my dd has had reflux, oral thrush, allergy shiners, and eczema. i have had yeast issues for a long time.

we did an elimination diet for 5 weeks and she continued to get worse. then we started acupuncture and herbs and finally started seeing some improvement.

but i was still really unsettled about what to feed her and the acupuncturist really wasn't giving me any guidance. i had read about the SCD here and it seemed like no one was really being helped much by it and also the restrictiveness of giving up ALL grains scared me, so i really resisted reading the book.

then finally 2 months ago i did read the book and it sounded like just what my dd needed.

so we've been SCD just about 8 weeks now, and her eczema is almost completely gone also she is able to tolerate cow's milk in small amounts, which she couldn't do before SCD.

i felt compelled to post about this, because i'm reading here that only 1 person has been helped by SCD???? when i started SCD i joined pecanbread.com's forums, and if you go there, you will see tons and tons of parents having success with their children on SCD.

there are several things that you have to do very strictly on SCD, and even one little transgression will keep you from healing. you have to do the intro diet for 2-5 days, you have to introduce foods one at a time and watch for reactions, you need to keep a journal listing all the foods eaten and behaviors and reactions observed, you have to adhere to the diet 100%, you have to make yur own yogurt and introduce it slwly and build up gradually...etc. i read that someone here had been on SCD for 9 months with no change....but then later they said they had been using Culturelle, which is illegal on SCD.

personally, i would not have had the success i'm having on SCD without being a part of the forum. i asked several questions there everyday and was guided by the SCD veterans there helping out the newbies. there's a lot that's not obvious and it's not written in the book. the moderators literally analyze everything you're eating. it's amazing how many mistakes you can make when you're new to it.

i hate to think that some here might poo poo the idea of SCD, and miss out on some real gut healing. i was almost swayed from trying it but now i'm so grateful that i did!

silvia
I'm glad the SCD has helped you. However, from what I've seen on this group, it has not/does not help most people, including myself. I was on the SCD 100% for 2 1/2 months and was not helped, nor was my DD. I can think of three adults who healed on the SCD during the time I've followed this tribe, two of whom had IBS-type diseases, and one who had yeast issues and did a whole bunch of non-SCD-legal things in addition to the SCD. Most of the kids who've done the SCD have shown some improvement, but none were healed as far as I know and all the moms eventually had to move on to other things for their kids.

The SCD was designed for IBS/Crohn's disease and that sort of thing, and people with those diseases are what it generally helps (and it doesn't help everyone with those diseases, either). It's also proven to be fairly effective for kids with autism spectrum disorders, and virtually everyone on the pecanbread group has a child/children with ASD. The SCD was not designed for things like candida overgrowth, which is what many of the mamas/kids on this tribe are dealing with. It doesn't work well for candida overgrowth as a primary problem from what I've seen. The person who had been doing the SCD for 9 month w/o success was dealing with a candida overgrowth.

Again, I'm glad your DD has been helped, but don't fall into the trap of thinking that if someone isn't helped by the SCD, they must have been doing something wrong. There is no one diet/program that helps everyone...unfortunately.
post #222 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluets View Post
i don't generally use digestive enzymes but i started to lately (because dh started to use them and i'm jsut mooching off his supply).
I've been using some, too. SuperEnzymes from NOW foods, nothing special and cheap, but they do seem to keep my stomach from hurting and decrease my gassiness, especially if I eat grains or beans.
post #223 of 251

IBD and GERD may be related

i'm not sure why i'm not shocked about this revelation.

------------

Positive association between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and irritable bowel syndrome in a Chinese population

Cheung et al.
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (OnlineAccepted Articles).
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2007.03304.x

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi...6.2007.03304.x

summary:

Background -- Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common diseases which may be related.

Aim -- To examine the association between GERD and IBS in Chinese population in Hong Kong.

Methods -- Randomly-selected ethnic Chinese were invited to participate in a telephone survey in 1996. GERD was defined as subjects having heartburn and/or acid regurgitation once weekly or more. Irritable bowel syndrome was diagnosed according to the Rome I criteria. The association between GERD and IBS was calculated using a statistical model which allows the odds ratio (OR) to be measured.

Results -- 1649 subjects completed the interview (response rate 62%). The population prevalence of GERD and IBS were 4.8% and 4.1%, respectively. 13% of subjects with GERD and 11% with IBS suffered from both GERD and IBS. The OR of having GERD and IBS together was estimated to be 3.0 (95% CI: 1.05, 6.27) indicating a positive association between the two diseases. This association occurred predominantly in male subjects [OR = 9.3, (95% CI: 2.3, 26.2)] but not as strong in females [OR = 1.5, (95% CI: 0.3, 4.3)]. Younger subjects were statistically more prone to the two diseases.

Conclusions -- There is a positive association between GERD and IBS and their association occurs predominantly in male subjects.
post #224 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluets View Post
i'm not sure why i'm not shocked about this revelation.

------------

Positive association between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and irritable bowel syndrome in a Chinese population

Cheung et al.
Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (OnlineAccepted Articles).
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2007.03304.x

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi...6.2007.03304.x

summary:

Background -- Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common diseases which may be related.

Aim -- To examine the association between GERD and IBS in Chinese population in Hong Kong.

Methods -- Randomly-selected ethnic Chinese were invited to participate in a telephone survey in 1996. GERD was defined as subjects having heartburn and/or acid regurgitation once weekly or more. Irritable bowel syndrome was diagnosed according to the Rome I criteria. The association between GERD and IBS was calculated using a statistical model which allows the odds ratio (OR) to be measured.

Results -- 1649 subjects completed the interview (response rate 62%). The population prevalence of GERD and IBS were 4.8% and 4.1%, respectively. 13% of subjects with GERD and 11% with IBS suffered from both GERD and IBS. The OR of having GERD and IBS together was estimated to be 3.0 (95% CI: 1.05, 6.27) indicating a positive association between the two diseases. This association occurred predominantly in male subjects [OR = 9.3, (95% CI: 2.3, 26.2)] but not as strong in females [OR = 1.5, (95% CI: 0.3, 4.3)]. Younger subjects were statistically more prone to the two diseases.

Conclusions -- There is a positive association between GERD and IBS and their association occurs predominantly in male subjects.
Ok, I seem to be one of the lucky females that has these two things. Well, technically I don't have GERD, but acute gastritis and a hiatal hernia, and IBS. But they don't say how to treat these things???
post #225 of 251
Since there is no TMI on this thread , what would lighter-colored poop indicate? Not grey, but in that direction. Malabsorption? And what to do about it? Enzymes?
post #226 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshine View Post
Since there is no TMI on this thread , what would lighter-colored poop indicate? Not grey, but in that direction. Malabsorption? And what to do about it? Enzymes?
www.enzymestuff.com --> resources --> studying stools
post #227 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshine View Post
Ok, I seem to be one of the lucky females that has these two things. Well, technically I don't have GERD, but acute gastritis and a hiatal hernia, and IBS. But they don't say how to treat these things???
ah but thorne.com might have something in alternative medicine review...

http://www.thorne.com/media/mono_l_arginine10-2.pdf
GERD - A small, double-blind trial found oral arginine supplementation significantly decreased the frequency and intensity of chest pain attacks, as well as the number of nitroglycerin tablets taken for analgesia, in patients with esophageal motility disorders. However, in another study, arginine infusions (500mg/kg body weight/120 min) failed to affect lower esophageal sphincter motility. No studies have yet explored the efficacy of arginine supplments for GERD.


have you seen this link? http://www.drlera.com/gastritis.htm
post #228 of 251

Jumping in

Hi everyone. I've been lurking a while, and can use some advice.

DS #7 is seven with a leaky gut and sensory issues. He's GFCFSF and we've gone to a DAN! doctor and he is all supplemented-up, but now I'm worried about ds#3.

The baby is 8 months and has been kind of miserable for ... 8 months. He cries a lot, practically all the time. He is really attached to DH and me. Just about won't let anyone else hold him. (We say that he fired the baby sitter.) He's BF and I've been on the TED for ten days (I was on it for 14 days, but messed up around DS#1's birthday. You can't spend all that time making a GFCF cake and not try it!). Baby is not very interested in baby food. He'll eat a little pears, has thrown up after rice cereal and sweet potatoes, but he does grab at my food, so maybe he wants to eat.

BAby is finally rolling over, is crawling, but is a horrible sleeper and is super sensitive to noise. He had three ear infections (which we rode out -- no Antibiotics, yay) before the TED.We tried ZANTAC but it didn't work and I'd rather not just 'try' meds. Oh, I had five bouts of mastitis and was positive for group B strep so he's been exposed to a lot of Antibiotics, upon birth.

He has oozing crud behind his right ear. He has gotten frequent diaper rash, but that's stopped since the TED.

He takes BabyDophilus (?). He is not VAXed (yet. DH wants him vaxed, AAAAA!)

I have an appt. to see a ped. gastro in a few weeks, but would rather try to heal him myself.

Thanks.

- paula
post #229 of 251
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie'sMama View Post
Hi everyone. I've been lurking a while, and can use some advice.

DS #7 is seven with a leaky gut and sensory issues. He's GFCFSF and we've gone to a DAN! doctor and he is all supplemented-up, but now I'm worried about ds#3.

The baby is 8 months and has been kind of miserable for ... 8 months. He cries a lot, practically all the time. He is really attached to DH and me. Just about won't let anyone else hold him. (We say that he fired the baby sitter.) He's BF and I've been on the TED for ten days (I was on it for 14 days, but messed up around DS#1's birthday. You can't spend all that time making a GFCF cake and not try it!). Baby is not very interested in baby food. He'll eat a little pears, has thrown up after rice cereal and sweet potatoes, but he does grab at my food, so maybe he wants to eat.

BAby is finally rolling over, is crawling, but is a horrible sleeper and is super sensitive to noise. He had three ear infections (which we rode out -- no Antibiotics, yay) before the TED.We tried ZANTAC but it didn't work and I'd rather not just 'try' meds. Oh, I had five bouts of mastitis and was positive for group B strep so he's been exposed to a lot of Antibiotics, upon birth.

He has oozing crud behind his right ear. He has gotten frequent diaper rash, but that's stopped since the TED.

He takes BabyDophilus (?). He is not VAXed (yet. DH wants him vaxed, AAAAA!)

I have an appt. to see a ped. gastro in a few weeks, but would rather try to heal him myself.

Thanks.

- paula

Does your DS seem less miserable when you're on the TED? It sounds like he's probably reacting to things you eat, and hopefuly if you can figure out what foods he reacts to, he'll start feeling much better. Then you can take a look at various diets to try to help heal both of your guts. Are you taking any probiotics?

If you can, read back through this thread and it will give you some more ideas on what you can do.
post #230 of 251

Hiatal hernia info. Warning: very long!

Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshine View Post
Ok, I seem to be one of the lucky females that has these two things. Well, technically I don't have GERD, but acute gastritis and a hiatal hernia, and IBS. But they don't say how to treat these things???
Here's some info about treating hiatal hernia. I copied the whole thing instead of linking to the info because you'd have to join the yahoo group to view it.

Hiatus Hernia, Exercise For
http://www.tiscali.co.uk/reference/e..._h_hernia.html

Strengthen the stomach muscles with the following exercises:

Lie on your back and bend your knees, leaving your feet flat on the floor. Lift your buttocks and lower back off the floor, leaving your feet and shoulders on the floor supporting the weight. Lower yourself gently. Repeat 10 times daily.


******************
Hiatal Hernia: An Overlooked Cause of Digestive Problems
From: “Hiatial Hernia: An Overlooked Cause of Disease” by: Steven H. Horne
http://www.joyfullivingservices.com/hiatalhernia.html
See the “Self Adjustment” Exercise about halfway through this article. NOTE: This article contains good overall information about a hiatal hernia, however, Bee does not necessarily agree with everything contained herein. One the major causes of a hiatal hernia, acid reflux and other stomach ailments is candida overgrowth.


About three years ago Jack Ritchason, a naturopathic physician, corrected a health problem I must have carried since childhood--a hiatal hernia. The impact this simple maneuver has had on my health has amazed me. I immediately noticed a difference in my lung capacity and my digestion and in the months that followed I began to put some muscle on my skin and bones frame and gain newfound strength and stamina.
Dr. Ritchason tells me that this is a common health problem and my own observations as well as those of others confirm this fact. But this is more than a personal observation as the American Digestive Disease Society has estimated that nearly half of all adults--some 60 million people--have a hiatal hernia.
It occurs more often in women than in men. It affects people of all ages, but is most prevalent in people over 50 and highly likely in people over 65.


The Great Mimic
Hiatal Hernia has been called the "great mimic" because it mimics many disorders. A person with this problem can get such severe pains in their chest that they think they are having a heart attack. They may think they have an over acid stomach because they will regurgitate stomach acid after they eat, or their stomach may hurt so badly they will think they have an ulcer. This is just a sampling of the symptoms that may occur from this disorder.


What is a Hiatal Hernia?
When you swallow, your food passes down a long tube known as the esophagus into the stomach. This tube must pass through a muscle known as the diaphragm, which is located near the bottom of your rib cage. This opening in the diaphragm, which permits the esophagus to pass through, is regulated by a sphincter muscle (or "valve") which relaxes and opens when we swallow to permit the food to pass through the diaphragm and into the stomach. This sphincter then closes to prevent stomach acid from coming back up into the throat. A hiatal hernia occurs when the top of the stomach rolls or slides up into this opening and becomes stuck there.


Symptoms
Naturally, when part of the stomach is forced into this opening, the sphincter cannot close properly. Thus, stomach acid may travel back up into the esophagus causing burning sensations (heartburn), esophageal spasms, inflammations and ulcers.
The cramped position of the stomach can also stress the vagus nerve, which stimulates the release of hydrochloric acid. This can cause both over and under secretion of hydrochloric acid and stomach enzymes. It may also affect the sphincter or valve at the bottom of the stomach so that digestive secretions "leak" out of the stomach and are lost before they have completed their job.
The hiatal hernia will also interfere with the movement of the diaphragm muscle. This muscle normally pulls downward to expand the chest capacity and inflate the lungs. Since the hiatal hernia interferes with this movement, the person may be restricted to shallow breathing, or will resort to using the chest and shoulders to expand the lung capacity and take a deep breath.
The esophagus may also "kink" in the throat, which will irritate the thyroid gland and may cause some difficulty in swallowing. Often persons with hiatal hernias will have difficulty in swallowing capsules or tablets as they get the sensation that they are "sticking" in their throat.
The irritation on the vagus nerve can cause reflex irritations throughout the body. The vagus nerve comes from the medulla and goes to the heart, esophagus, lungs, stomach, small intestines, liver, gall bladder, pancreas and colon. It also has links to the kidney, bladder, and external genitalia. Thus, a hiatal hernia may start imbalances in the system such as decreased stomach acid and ph imbalance in the intestines and elsewhere.
If a person develops poor stomach digestion due to a lack of hydrochloric acid, they will have difficulty digesting and assimilating protein and most minerals. It will also contribute to food putrefaction in the intestines, causing greater toxicity in the body. This lack of nutrition and toxic condition may contribute towards food allergies, constipation, anaemia and immune and glandular system weaknesses.
Two other problems that a hiatal hernia may contribute to are asthma and heart disease. Since the hernia reduces the lung capacity by interfering with natural breathing, it could be a factor in asthma. The hernia may also put pressure on the heart. Gas in the intestines may put pressure on the hernia and push it against the bottom of the heart, which may be one way in which a heart attack can be triggered. None of this spells immediate fatality, but it does point to a major contributing factor in degenerative illness.


Causes
The causes of a hiatal hernia are speculative and unique to each individual. However, there are a number causes. First of all there may be a mechanical cause. Improper lifting, hard coughing bouts heavy lifting, sharp blows to the abdomen (the kind that "knock the wind out of you"), tight clothing and poor posture may contribute to the development of this problem. Improper lifting may be the biggest mechanical cause of this disorder. If the air is not expelled out of a person's lungs while lifting, it will force the stomach into the esophagus.
Secondly, there are dietary causes. Hiatal hernia just about always accompanies a swollen ileocecal valve. The ileocecal valve is the valve between the small and large intestines which permits material to enter the colon from the large intestine, but prevents material in the colon from moving back into the small intestine. When this valve becomes swollen and irritated it cannot close properly. This allows material from the colon to leak back into the small intestine. This is analogous your sewer backing up into your kitchen. This creates gas and indigestion, which puts pressure on the stomach and presses it tighter against the diaphragm.
The relationship between the ileocecal valve and the hiatal hernia is a chicken/egg situation ... it is hard to know which comes first. However, it is clear that the ileocecal problem aggravates the hernia. Hence, the things which irritate that valve may be causal factors. These are the basic causes of digestive problems: poor food combining, overeating, drinking with meals, overeating and eating when upset.
Lastly, there are emotional causes. According to one applied kinesiologist text a hiatal hernia comes from repressed anger. A person "swallows their anger" and "can't stomach it." When you get angry, you suck your breadth upward. If you fail to release this anger, your stomach stays up. I have observed that most of the people with severe hiatal hernias have a great deal of emotional stress and hold a lot of it inside.


Identification
The easiest way to tell if you or someone you know has a hiatal hernia is to place your fingers on the solar Plexus, just below the breastbone. Then take a deep breath. You should feel the solar plexus expand and move outward. If there is no movement at the solar plexus and you have to lift your chest and shoulders to take a deep breath, then you probably have a hiatal hernia. You should be able to take a deep abdominal breath without lifting your shoulders.
There are other, more complicated, methods of determining if you have a hiatal hernia, such as muscle testing, but this is a fairly simple and reliable method.


Correction
Since a hiatal hernia is primarily a mechanical problem, the easiest and best way to correct it is mechanically. Medical doctors have attempted surgery to correct this disorder, but the results tend to be poor. Cutting into this area can further weaken it so that the hernia will return in short order. A better method is to manipulate the stomach and bring down the hernia by hand. Unfortunately, you can't do this to yourself. You will need to find a good chiropractor, applied kinesiologist or massage therapist who understands this problems and knows how to correct it.
If you want to learn how to do this adjustment to others, you will have to find someone who does it and have them show you how since it is impossible to adequately describe the technique(s) in writing. They have to be learned through demonstration and practice.
For a chiropractor in your area who knows how to adjust hiatal hernias, click here.


Self-Adjustment
There are some self-help adjustment techniques. They aren't as effective as having someone else perform the adjustment, but they may help. The best one I've tried is to drink a pint of warm water first thing in the morning, then stand on your toes and drop suddenly to your heels several times. The warm water helps to relax the stomach and diaphragm and puts some weight in the stomach. By dropping down suddenly, the weight of the water helps to pull the stomach down. In a mild case, this might be enough to bring the hernia down. In a more severe case it may loosen the stomach and make it easier for someone else to bring it down. It will also help you to keep the stomach down once mechanical corrections have been made.


Untraditional Aids
Until the problem is corrected mechanically, there are some nutritional therapies which may be of help. Immediate, but temporary, relief of pain and discomfort can often be achieved by the use of a mucilaginous herb like slippery elm or comfrey. These herbs absorb the digestive secretions and help to prevent their traveling back up the esophagus and burning it. They also help to prevent irritation of the ileocecal valve. Comfrey can also speed the healing of this problem once mechanical adjustments have been made. Okra pepsin is a good combination for this problem as well.
Marshmallow is also helpful in soothing the mucous membranes for hiatal hernias and other ulcerations in the gastrointestinal system.
A digestive aid will help the person obtain the nutrients they need when the hernia is interfering with digestion.
This may take the form of a hydrochloric acid supplement or a food enzyme tablet, or perhaps an herbal digestive aid such as papaya and peppermint, chamomile tea, safflowers, ginger root and so forth.
Other food or herb products that have been used to help people with hiatal hernias include: raw cabbage juice (where ulcerations have occurred), balm, barley water, brown rice, celery, coriander, gentian, hops, licorice, marshmallow, and passion flower.
Dietary modifications may be necessary to relieve the problem and to keep it from reoccurring once it has been corrected. Since the pressure of abdominal gas can push the stomach upward, it would be advisable to avoid gas forming foods like beans. It would also be wise to watch food combinations carefully and to avoid overeating. Dr. Jack Ritchason recommends that people with hiatal hernias avoid eating any heavy meals after 3 pm.
Below you will find a checklist of symptoms which will help you in identifying people who have this problem so they can take steps to correct it.


Symptoms of a Hiatal Hernia


What is a Hiatal Hernia?
A hiatal hernia occurs when the top of the stomach rolls or slides up into the opening in the diaphragm which the esophagus passes through and becomes stuck there.
This condition may create difficulty with digestion (and hence general nutrition and well-being) as well as breathing difficulties, nervous problems, circulatory problems and glandular imbalances. All of the following symptoms have been connected with a hiatal hernia. If you have some of these symptoms especially those marked with an asterisk (*) you may wish to consider being checked for this condition.


DIGESTIVE DIFFICULTIES
*Belching, *Bloating, *Heartburn, *Difficulty digesting meat/high protein foods, Tension or pressure at the solar plexus, Sensitivity at the waist, Intestinal gas, Regurgitation, Hiccups, Lack or limitation of appetite, Nausea, Vomiting, Diarrhea, Constipation, Colic in children, Difficulty in gaining weight or overweight, Ulcers.


BREATHING AND CIRCULATION PROBLEMS
*Difficulty with deep abdominal breathing, *Difficulty in swallowing capsules, *Asthma, *Inability to take a deep breath from diaphragm, Overall fatigue, Tendency to swallow air, Allergies, Dry tickling cough, Full feeling at base of throat, Pain or burning in upper chest, Pressure in the chest, Pain in the left side of chest, Pressure below breastbone, Lung pain, Rapid heartbeat, Rapid rise in blood pressure, Pain in left shoulder, arm or side of neck.


STRUCTURAL COMPLAINTS
TMJ (Temporo-Mandibular Joint Pain), Bruxism (Grinding teeth in sleep), Joint pain, Localized or overall spinal pain, Headaches.


STRESS
*Suppression of anger or other emotions, *Living with or having lived with a quick-tempered person, Dizziness, Shakiness, Mental Confusion, Anxiety attacks, Insomnia, Hyperactivity in children.


OTHER AILMENTS
*Open ileocecal valve, *General weakness, *Difficulty in getting and/or staying healthy, Overactive thyroid, Cravings for sugar or alcohol, Candida Albicans, Menstrual or prostate problems, Urinary difficulties, Hoarseness.


Sources
For more information about the problem of hiatal hernias, read the book "Hiatal Hernia Syndrome: Insidious Link to Major Illness" by Theodore A. Baroody, Jr., M.A., D.C., "Hiatus Hernia" by Penny Hemphill from an Australian Magazine, Nature & Health, and "Chiropractic Handout".


Send e-mail to joyful@best.com if you have questions about Hiatal Hernias.
post #231 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by APmomma View Post
So after dealing with all of my son's gut issues and finally getting to a place where he seems to be doing well, I end up in the ER with diverticulitis. I am on an antibiotic but I cut the dose in half because I want to give my little guy a break! Could his issues be at all related to this?? I am wondering if this happened to me because of the limited diet I have been on due to his issues. They were shocked at the ER because I am only 26 years old and the dr said it usually happens in older people.

Has anyone ever had any experience with this??

I haven't read the whole thread yet (I'm slogging through), but I'm pretty sure the SCD diet is supposed to heal divertculitis. Do you have the book Breaking The Vicious Cycle?
post #232 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAmama View Post
Hey mamas! I posted here before, but I mostly lurk and learn. Now I have a question. We are working on healing our guts (mine and dd's and dh's while we are at it) but I do have a hard time finding a probiotic that doesn't make dd's eczema flare up. The problem seems to be the fillers - maltodextrine or rice starch (we don't do wheat, corn or rice). That is if the probiotic itself isn't grown on dairy or soy Caedmyn, do you know what fillers custom probiotics have? I cannot access their website from here (China). I think I would want to get them, but I cannot spend the money if I just end up giving them away again. Also, why do you think are they not making a difference for your dd?
Do you have a phone number for them? And, last question, I would order it and have it sent to my MIL and then she would send it to us. Is that a possibility or does it need to be kept cool?
Thanks!
I haven't finished the thread yet, but I just wanted to say that maltodextrin is almost always corn-derived.
post #233 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluets View Post
a bit of an ongoing discussion about dairy allergy in one of the mailing lists i'm on.... it got me thinking and i thought i'd share...

dairy allergy could be one of many things:

(1) lactose intolerance
(2) reaction to beta-casein though more likely its breakdown products
(3) reaction to amines in fermented milk products
(4) true IgE allergy to casein
(5) reaction to glutamates (in UHT milk) in glutamate-sensitive individuals

i'm thinking about (2) because that is most likely near and dear to me. so i've been perusing the literature about beta-casein and its derivative products: opioids. yes, THOSE opioids. it turns out that beta-casein gives rise to beta-casomorphin, an opioid peptide (short little chunk of a bigger protein).

the cool thing is that there may become a test that can be done for breastfed infants showing signs of allergy. details on the science only:

Serum activity of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV; EC 3.4.14.5) in breast-fed infants with symptoms of allergy

abstract:
β-Casomorphins, opioid peptides present in mother's milk, are a good substrate for DPPIV (EC 3.4.14.5) which is a major factor limiting the half-life of biologically active peptides. Serum DPPIV activity of two groups of infants (healthy and atopic dermatitis) and contents of β-casomorphin-5 and -7 in their mothers’ milk were determined in the study. We have found correlation between those two parameters in the group of children with atopic dermatitis syndromes, while no such a correlation was found in the control group.

translation:
Beta-casomorphins can act as a fuel for a protein called DPPIV, something that maks biologically active proteins breakdown rapidly. One can look at DPPIV activity in healthy and atopic infants, along with the amount of beta-casomorphin-5 and -7 (different forms of BCM) in mama's milk. In atopic infants, there is a correlation between the amount of BCM-5 and /or BCM-7 in their mama's milk and the level of DPPIV activity in the infant. Presumably, this is a negative correlation (the more BCM there is, the more fuel for DPPIV, the less DPPIV there will be).

there are papers about lab tests for both DPPIV and BCM though i haven't quite finished searching for companies that actually DO those tests. it would be a sweet way to confirm an allergy (or not).


beta-casomorphins, because of the amino acid content, are not broken down in the GI tract and contribute to increased mucus production in the backend of the small intestine, in the large intestine and perhaps in the colon. (which led one group of researchers to conclude, a few years ago, that perhaps dairy products would be a good way to boost one's immune system because this enhanced mucosal layer in the gut prevents other bugs from penetrating the intestinal lumen - a duh moment i guess).

there are 2 forms of beta-casein, A1 and A2. the A2 milk corporation (in NZ) would have us believe that cows carrying the A2 form of beta-casein are better than cows carrying A1 -- science is debating this claim. however, it is clear that some people do respond differently to these different forms of beta-casein. apparently jersey cows tend to be A2 more often than A1...

and another thing... Lactococcus lactis (one of our probiotic/yogurt/kefir friends) breaks apart beta-casein - demonstrated quite convincingly in the lab.

back to opioids.... i react BADLY to codeine (another opioid) which now makes sense in light of my new understanding about casein.
That's so fascinating. Are there any probiotics that specifically contain Lactococcus lactis? I don't recognize it, so I wondered if it goes by any other name?
post #234 of 251
post #235 of 251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie'sMama View Post
Hi everyone. I've been lurking a while, and can use some advice.

DS #7 is seven with a leaky gut and sensory issues. He's GFCFSF and we've gone to a DAN! doctor and he is all supplemented-up, but now I'm worried about ds#3.

The baby is 8 months and has been kind of miserable for ... 8 months. He cries a lot, practically all the time. He is really attached to DH and me. Just about won't let anyone else hold him. (We say that he fired the baby sitter.) He's BF and I've been on the TED for ten days (I was on it for 14 days, but messed up around DS#1's birthday. You can't spend all that time making a GFCF cake and not try it!). Baby is not very interested in baby food. He'll eat a little pears, has thrown up after rice cereal and sweet potatoes, but he does grab at my food, so maybe he wants to eat.

BAby is finally rolling over, is crawling, but is a horrible sleeper and is super sensitive to noise. He had three ear infections (which we rode out -- no Antibiotics, yay) before the TED.We tried ZANTAC but it didn't work and I'd rather not just 'try' meds. Oh, I had five bouts of mastitis and was positive for group B strep so he's been exposed to a lot of Antibiotics, upon birth.

He has oozing crud behind his right ear. He has gotten frequent diaper rash, but that's stopped since the TED.

He takes BabyDophilus (?). He is not VAXed (yet. DH wants him vaxed, AAAAA!)

I have an appt. to see a ped. gastro in a few weeks, but would rather try to heal him myself.

Thanks.

- paula
I would keep a food journal to see what foods he is reacting to, and/or do another TED. Also, with the rounds of antibiotics you guys have had, I would bet you've got a yeast overgrowth on top of everything else. I would definitely cut out the rice cereal (and any other grains) for the baby. Babies do not have the digestive enzymes to break down grains until age 2 (correct me if I'm wrong on that, anyone).

IIRC, Babydophilus contains some common allergens. I would get on Solaray or another allergen free supplement (of bifidus) for your ds.
post #236 of 251
Thanks to all of you for your responses. I'm doing better today -- I think that I took the whole letter incident badly because, even though it shouldn't, havnig DD be diagnosed as FTT (and not to know that's what was about to happen as I read the letter) made me feel like someone was telling me I was neglecting my daughter. I know that's stupid since I'm doing everything within my power to work this issue, but I still felt that way.

I have checked my iron levels and they are good, and I do cook with cast iron. I haven't been doing the nettles because they aren't SCD, and I'm guessing they are high in salicylates, too . I'm still trying to be SCD compliant and avoid high amine/salicylate/gluatmate foods (though I'm nowhere near FAILSAFE). Needless to say, I don't eat much!

We have an appiontment with the pediatric GI on the 12th, and I did post in our tribal area to see if anyone knew of him or had other recs.

So, I'm going to chill out, get and stay positive and enjoy this sneak of spring weather that we're getting.

Thanks again, all.
post #237 of 251
I have to respond to Paula in this thread to be sure she sees it...

Please look around the Vaccinations forum for help with your DH.

Would he read the recent parent's stories?

Marissa's story
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=572635
post #238 of 251
Jane,

DS #1 is vaccine injured (with sensory processing issues) and so is our beloved nephew, but DH says, "I'd rather have a quirky DS#3 than a child dead from a vaccine preventable illness."

Basically, I'm just trying to ignore the subject. If I don't bring it up, I don't think he will. I feel like DS#3 is so delicate. He's on the edge right now -- may even already have sensory issues (at least) -- I can't imagine what vaxxing him would do....

thanks for directing me to Marissa's story. That was just awful.

- paula
post #239 of 251


Well in that case for your DH, maybe it's just as simple gathering data about how very very few deaths occur from VPDs... And how many deaths due to vaccines are logged in VAERS (and even the CDC admits its woefully incomplete).

Learn more about nutritional healing such as high vitamin A for measles and high vitamin C for all. (And an excellent diet including these nutrients and others such as minerals, can prevent sickness. Disease does not occur in a vacuum, or randomly as a bolt of lightening, you *can* do something about it.) Read Dr. Thomas Levy's book, that was finally the book that made me 100% comfortable with not vaxing, it is very eye opening.

Vitamin C, Infectious Diseases, and Toxins: Curing the Incurable
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=507310
post #240 of 251

Please help!

I posted this under "Breastfeeding Challenges", but thought I might find help here as well....maybe someone here has experienced something similiar:

DD (Grace) is 3 weeks old today, and since my milk came in (on day 2) she has had explosive stools, just once, sometimes twice a day. They are huge, and yellow in color. Originally they were VERY watery, but have thickened a little, but are still liquid and foamy, but bright to dark yellow in color. (Urine output is abundant.)

That first week, I thought maybe her stools were the result of foremilk/hindmilk imbalance, and sto would feed her on the same breast until it felt empty, ilo switching each feeding. It didn't seem to make a difference, except that my supply has diminished so much that she is now on my breast constantly. I don't mind that so much....I know she is trying to bring my supply back up....but her stooling pattern has me concerned.....(At her 10 day check up she had already nearly regained her b/w.

Also, I am taking her for a weight check tomorrow morning at her peds office....while I know this info will be very valuable, I am really nervous they will push me to supplement, and if she isn't gaining appropriately I worry that I would jump the gun and do just that.

Anybody else seen this stool pattern....could it be something in my diet? Or maybe I just don't produce much higher fat milk at all regardless of how I feed her/switch breasts?


~jo
& Grace, 3 weeks today!
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