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Children's Books I hate! - Page 7

post #121 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
Oh, but I forgot to add my ALL TIME LEAST FAVORITE BOOK: ONCE UPON A POTTY. It's the stupidist book alive.
Yes! YES!!!!!!!

Oh, that is a stupid book. And I paid $$$ for it, too.

Quote:
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat
and sat and sat and sat and sat and sat

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!
post #122 of 236
Okay yes, I seriously don't like WTWTA. Shoot me. I may be able to understand that it's just a story and that stories are not always to be taken literally etc., but my toddler can't. People who write children's stories really ought to take that into consideration. She has it, and we've read it, and talked about how Max's mama was wrong and sometimes mamas do the wrong thing. I mean, it's not horrible on the same scale as having to see people beat their kids in Walmart, but I like to keep her exposure to things like that to a minimum, and make sure they're not normalized.
post #123 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madre Piadosa View Post
on professor i had swore that harry the dirty dog was racist. when the dog is black and dirty the family doesn't want him or love him, but once is is white and clean he is acceptable.
: Wow.
post #124 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by paquerette View Post
Okay yes, I seriously don't like WTWTA. Shoot me. I may be able to understand that it's just a story and that stories are not always to be taken literally etc., but my toddler can't. People who write children's stories really ought to take that into consideration. She has it, and we've read it, and talked about how Max's mama was wrong and sometimes mamas do the wrong thing. I mean, it's not horrible on the same scale as having to see people beat their kids in Walmart, but I like to keep her exposure to things like that to a minimum, and make sure they're not normalized.
Well, Max *was* chasing the dog with a fork. Maybe he did that because he's an abused child? Anyway, the time in his room couldn't be long as his food was still warm.

Maybe Max's mother wasn't wrong. Maybe Max was really tired and needed his little nap to where the wild things are so he could join the world refreshed. He certainly looks relieved in that last pic. And what child hasn't experienced a feeling of not being understood? (I am sure some will chime in and say their child has never had a tantrum).

Honestly, kids like the absurd. And not every child buys the sweet rainbow world parents try to feed them. Most children get frustrated with parents or the world at times. These books recognize that life and emotions are complicated-- even for the child with perfect parents.

It's why I like No, David! Even if you hardly ever say no to kids, sometimes kids still feel controlled (no sugar, no tv, no reading books with a less than perfect view of the world). I think children can see the humor and can relate to this imperfection, no matter how much we adults can't.
post #125 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
Yes! YES!!!!!!!

Oh, that is a stupid book. And I paid $$$ for it, too.




Aaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!
I don't know this book. But a minute to an adult is like an enternity to a child too young to use a toilet. Maybe the book is trying to see if from a toddler's point of view?
post #126 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post

It's why I like No, David! . . . I think children can see the humor and can relate to this imperfection, no matter how much we adults can't.
I think the thing I like best about No, David (and I do like it and most of David Shannon's other books) is that I feel like it sort of lends credibility to all the times I say No to the kids. Sometimes when I say No, they look at me like I'm just pulling rules out of my butt. But with No, David, I can say, "See, picking your nose IS gross. It's not just me!"
post #127 of 236
My children loved Once Upon a Potty. A lot. We have the boy version and it was worth having only to see the look of horror on in-laws faces when dd used to read it all the time. Oh my, she will know boys have a penis. Ignoring the fact that she was aware of that long before she got her hands on that book.
post #128 of 236
Ha, I just discovered this thread. We love pretty much all of the books previously mentioned, although we haven't read "Rainbow Fish" and definitely won't be now that I read this thread!

"Green Eggs & Ham" and "Chicka-Chicka Boom-Boom" are two of DD's favorites.
post #129 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimim View Post
(Although William does have bottles.)
He's also part of a family of talking pigs who live in an apartment and wear clothes. Now what kind of example is that?
post #130 of 236
dd LOVED Once Upon a Potty...was one of the things that finally got her to go poop there on a regular basis..

SHe likes the Grouchy Ladybug...I dont get the message in it...but it's about a ladybug that wants to fight everything... 0.0

Loves me the Robert Munsch though.

DH reads her Clifford in French.

dunno, I think I draw the line at barbie and princess books...we dont get her those at all..
post #131 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by hhurd View Post
He's also part of a family of talking pigs who live in a apartment and wear clothes. Now what kind of example is that?
I am hoping those pigs were kosher, at least. :
post #132 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
I don't know this book. But a minute to an adult is like an enternity to a child too young to use a toilet. Maybe the book is trying to see if from a toddler's point of view?
I get that element - but trust me, after you've read that one page about eight thousand times, you're ready to rip it out of the book and burn it. What bugs me about OUaP is the way that it's written - and the "new potty" looks like a frigging chamberpot from a couple of centuries ago.

"Was it a hat?" "Was it a milk bowl for the cat?"

And "A pee-pee to go wee-wee" just doesn't do it for me.

I like The Princess and the Potty way better.
post #133 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
I get that element - but trust me, after you've read that one page about eight thousand times, you're ready to rip it out of the book and burn it. What bugs me about OUaP is the way that it's written - and the "new potty" looks like a frigging chamberpot from a couple of centuries ago.

"Was it a hat?" "Was it a milk bowl for the cat?"

And "A pee-pee to go wee-wee" just doesn't do it for me.

I like The Princess and the Potty way better.

It does sound silly. lol

My sister is here and she knows it. She said the potty looks like the Swedish Bjorn potty, that is all one piece.
post #134 of 236
you know how OLD Once Upon a Potty is??

I know I was read it when I was PLing.

I know my DH was read it when he was PLing...

heck my MIL kept the same copy and read it to all three of her boys while they PL'd
post #135 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandora114 View Post
you know how OLD Once Upon a Potty is??
you know how OLD I am??



I remember when that book was new (only the boy version), laughing my ass off reading it with my cousin in a dept. store.
post #136 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by spero View Post
"Was it a hat?" "Was it a milk bowl for the cat?"
Yep, and Once Upon a Potty has led my two year old to try our potty chair on as a hat (AFTER peeing in it), and wanting to fill it with milk and pretend to be a cat!

And FYI, we still read it a ton. I just grit my teeth and skip about 30 of the 'and sat and sat and sat's
post #137 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixiepunk View Post
the vast majority of sibling preparation books make me nuts. between the "mommy's going to leave to go to the hospital" and "daddy's going to give the baby a bottle" and pictures of cribs, bouncy seats, disposible diapers and the like i was appalled to find that there were only like two books i found on the subject that i could even modify for my DD.
ok, OT, but i wanted to pass on "welcome with love" by jenni overend and juli vivas. my wonderful bff gave it to us when we were expecting dd2 and planning a homebirth.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw...&Go.y=13&Go=Go

i think it's ?aussie/nz, but it's a homebirth, told from the perspective of a sibling (?the youngest, there's ?3 kids at home already). the midwife comes, mama takes a walk and later stands up to birth the baby, and everyone sleeps on the floor together in front of the fireplace that night. not a crib/bottle in sight! and the illustration of the birth gave dd1 some prep of witnessing the actual birth in a format she could relate to (vs those videos of births).
post #138 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post
It.

We have some story with the characters illustrated like hedgehogs, I think, where the little girl keeps stalling at bedtime. She keeps getting out of bed. It is handled very nicely until the end when the father asks if she knows what will happen if she gets up again. The answer is a spanking.

ETA Bedtime for Frances is the book I was thinking of in the above description.

I *hate* Bedtime for Frances bc of the spanking part...but, we changed it around a bit; it would be kisses from our dog, with horrible breath.

DH loves the book, and thinks Im crazy for not reading it to him.
post #139 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
Well, Max *was* chasing the dog with a fork. Maybe he did that because he's an abused child? Anyway, the time in his room couldn't be long as his food was still warm.

Maybe Max's mother wasn't wrong. Maybe Max was really tired and needed his little nap to where the wild things are so he could join the world refreshed. He certainly looks relieved in that last pic. And what child hasn't experienced a feeling of not being understood? (I am sure some will chime in and say their child has never had a tantrum).

Honestly, kids like the absurd. And not every child buys the sweet rainbow world parents try to feed them. Most children get frustrated with parents or the world at times. These books recognize that life and emotions are complicated-- even for the child with perfect parents.

It's why I like No, David! Even if you hardly ever say no to kids, sometimes kids still feel controlled (no sugar, no tv, no reading books with a less than perfect view of the world). I think children can see the humor and can relate to this imperfection, no matter how much we adults can't.
Exactly. I look at it like this. Max's mom was going to lose her temper. So she sent Max to his room to chill while she finished dinner. So he daydreamed while she made dinner. (Remember "where he found his supper waiting for him... and it was still hot.").
post #140 of 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyMommy View Post
Okay, sorry, I have to learn how to use multi-quote...

I totally understand what you're saying here but it struck me how it touches upon a discussion "we" just had here about how it's never too old to need warmth and contact; ie. even as adults our parents would welcome us back to snuggle if we were sad/lonely/scared, etc.
That's my "take" on this book. How incredibly reassuring to know that in Mom's eyes, we are always beloved just as much as when we were "new."

eta: removed thread reference
Yeah, I think I like the underlying message in the book, but not the execution. I have a very close relationship with my parents, but I don't sit in their laps. I think if they had just showed them hugging or something, it would feel less creepy.

Also, it's been a while since I read the book, but I remember feeling like all of the affection was one way, which made me feel like maybe the mom was smothering more than the son wanted or needed her so much.
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