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Unschooling Support Thread - Page 9

post #161 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by nini2033a View Post
I feel like we are moving away from unschooling here, : because we are now going to be taking several classes...
It seems to me that your son's being able to pursue his interest in whatever classes he's interested in actually is part of the unschooling experience - he's following his interests and expanding his world. Same as if he were tucking into books for that same number of hours, or playing piano for that same number of hours, or outside looking for worms...

I do sympathize with your concern that he might decide he wants to go to full time school, but I also think he probably enjoys being more in control of his time to be able to pick and choose like that. - Lillian
post #162 of 174
Audma,
Welcome! Part of the unschooling thing is that you don't have to "fit" in the other definitions. You learn thru day to day life and what the kids interests are...Some of the periods we have gone thru include the present anything medival period, the Bill Nye and his Science rules the universe period, the all things Pokemon period which was characterized with leaps in phonics, and the all things cuttable period when he mastered scissor skills.
In fact, we are taking some classes this fall, but they are all things that he has picked that deal with his interests,( the kindergarten experience class deals with his interest in snack & story time~ after a visit he absolutely wants to try that one)
post #163 of 174
I haven't had time to read all the posts in this thread (lots of pages!!) but I'm perusing them as I have time...

I'm Mary, family-schooling mama to 3 lovelies.

Nic is 8, creative, brilliant, gifted monkey diagnosed with ADHD -- devoted to becoming a robotics engineer -- deeply interested in animals and understanding/protecting ecosystems.

Theo is 4, wonderful, creative learner...seems to absorb everything from just being around all of us. Tactile guy, loves clay and paint. Learned colors, numbers, shapes, alphabet, numbers while none of us were paying attention to whether or not he was learning anything.

Whingari is 8 months. Fascinating to watch, fascinated by her big brothers...

We've used many types of books, curricula, ideas, experiments over the last couple years.
Unschooling is what feels right for me and these particular children. Nic always loves learning when no one is getting in his way or placing limits on his imagination. I blog about this journey here: http://attachlings.blogspot.com/

We live in Indianapolis, Indiana, which is a great homeschooling area, many resources, quite a few groups. Indiana is a 'good' homeschooling state, in my opinion, because you don't have to ask permission or approval and you don't have to jump through any bureaucratic hoops to continue doing so.

So we can learn as we live and watch our children thrive.
post #164 of 174
I just bumped the more recent unschooling thread.


nini, I agree with Lillian--just taking classes doesn't mean one isn't an unschooler. My kids have taken bunches of classes--but it's not because I've assigned them, or "made" them go, it's because THEY have decided it's something they want to do.
post #165 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by SagMom View Post
--but it's not because I've assigned them, or "made" them go, it's because THEY have decided it's something they want to do.
I know, but I am afraid it is just the beginning and he will want to eventually go to public full time....
post #166 of 174

A general question about unschooling

I am curious what you do when your child asks you to help them learn something you yourself do not know. For example, my math education doesn't go past elementary school due to a bunch of bad math teachers. If my daughter was asking about place values, I don't even know what that is. I would be concerned that I was sending her out into the workforce ill-equipped. Frankly a lot of good jobs in the sciences and technological fields require a very firm grasp of mathematics. What if you can't "get" the subject yourself?
post #167 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veronica C. View Post
I am curious what you do when your child asks you to help them learn something you yourself do not know. For example, my math education doesn't go past elementary school due to a bunch of bad math teachers. If my daughter was asking about place values, I don't even know what that is. I would be concerned that I was sending her out into the workforce ill-equipped. Frankly a lot of good jobs in the sciences and technological fields require a very firm grasp of mathematics. What if you can't "get" the subject yourself?
I don't feel I have to be my children's only teacher. If they wanted to go beyond my level (of skill or interest) in any subject, I would help them learn how to learn - find a textbook, a teacher, an apprenticeship, or whatever works for the subject. To learn a foreign language for example, I might help a kid pick a textbook with tapes, find a native speaker to practice with, rent movies in the language, travel to the country (well, maybe...); whatever we could think of.

Math is an easy subject to find self-paced, self-taught texts, so I imagine any motivated student could work to whatever level they desire. Those science and technology jobs you mention often require a college degree or other formal training. If an unschooled child is interested in a field like that, it is up to them to meet the entrance requirements (with all the support and encouragement from parents) - the main difference is that the motivation is internal.
post #168 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veronica C. View Post
I am curious what you do when your child asks you to help them learn something you yourself do not know.
What do YOU do when YOU want to learn something?

I might find myself a teacher, or a website, book, video, kit, class, etc. in order to learn something that I want to learn. It's no different for my kids.
post #169 of 174
There are lots of great materials through which they can learn all sort of math on their own - and maybe even with a parent's participation learning right alongside. And there's lots of time for it. Here's an interesting article on how little time it can take:
Just Do the Math!

When my son was ready to take the SAT for college applications, he just got a bunch of good materials, a tutor for a short time to help with specific algebra concepts he wanted to figure out, and got on with learning what he needed - and he did well.

You might find some fun ideas in this page of annotated math links for getting more comfortable with math: Go Figure! One of the fun things about homeschooling is having a chance to find the enjoyment in some of the things you might have missed back in your own school days. Lillian
post #170 of 174
my 3.5 yo DD begged me to go to school...so....it was hard but we decided to try it out. She started today.

1/2 day, Tuesdays only. ONE-HALF day a week! 3 hours! And she gets to think she's "in school". Cute huh? Do I have to change my siggy line?
post #171 of 174

The Wisdom of Pooh

I have been reading through the posts in this thread and, while looking for a particular quote, I ran across this one by Winnie the Pooh and it just kind of reminded me of the support/theory unschoolers might want.

"You can't help respecting anybody who can spell TUESDAY, even if he doesn't spell it right; but spelling isn't everything. There are days when spelling Tuesday simply doesn't count.”

Have a great "school year"!

--Victoria
post #172 of 174

Need some support...

*
post #173 of 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrweaver View Post
"You can't help respecting anybody who can spell TUESDAY, even if he doesn't spell it right; but spelling isn't everything. There are days when spelling Tuesday simply doesn't count.”



Cute. But it's funny to me that he didn't say "Wednesday." - Lillian
post #174 of 174
Just wanted to check in and say hi to everyone. I have been in the middle of a move and have not had much time on the computer. Still am unpacking and have tons to do, so there is little time now to sit and chat. But just wanted to touch in with all my tribes.

So, I am still around, just not very vocal at this moment.

I am so glad that we are unschooling now though. It is so easy to unschool when you are moving, and so much easier than if we had to unpack all the school books to school them.
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