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talk to me about cub scouts...

post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 
i know very little about them. my brother was one... i always wanted to be one (but couldn't : )... and i think it might do my son good.

input?



ETA ~ and for the love of God people, PLEASE don't turn this into a debate thread.
post #2 of 49
I know enough that none of my boys will be joining. I don't like their stance on homosexuality or non-Christians.
post #3 of 49
Cub scouts starts with tigers in first grade, and ends with 2nd year Weblos half way through fifth grade. Boy scouts begins with fifth graders and ends when the scout turns 18. I think your cub scout experience depends entirely on #1 the quality of the pack (entire group) and #2 the quality of your den (small group). Ask around your neighborhood to get the scoop on your group. There are often several packs in an area, so you might shop around for the best one. The best are the most active. They do lots of fun family campouts, meet several times a month, and have plenty of parental support to keep the whole ball rolling.

My oldest is one merit badge and a project away from getting his eagle. He's made lots of friends and discovered he likes climbing, repelling, canoeing, etc. Cubs don't start out that adventurous. They camp with their families and learn how to roast weenies, whittle bars of soap, and make indian walking sticks. Fun stuff!
post #4 of 49
Thread Starter 
yeah i knew about their views on homosexuality but that was about it.


RBinTEX thanks for the info!! where would i find out, just ask around?

and, how much involvement is required of the parents themselves? (please don't take this the wrong way ~~ i'd LOVE to do everything with him but i'm a working student single mother and ... well, i don't have a lot of free time!) i remember my parents dropping my brother off a few times a month with his group, and i remember him going on camping trips but my parents never went.

i guess my son would be cub scout age; maybe i should change the title of my post...
post #5 of 49
Usually the best time to join would be right after the start of a new school year. The boys come home with flyers advertising info nights. Each pack recruits separately, and usually only one pack recruits at a school, so they are not competing with each other for members. Each pack has a charter organization (usually a church) that provides them with a meeting place. Our town has three cub/boy scout packs/troops in our area, and the one we chose was not the one that recruits at our elemetary school. I found out about the other one through word of mouth. So, I guess asking around would be your best bet. Scouts like to get their pictures in the local papers, so check yours out to see which groups are getting photographed at all the fun places!

They will try to get as many volunteers on board as possible, but there are a lot of single parents just like you who do what they can when they can. There are lots of opportunities to do little things, like bringing snacks or gathering supplies.

Boy scouts do not camp with parents, generally, but cub scouts are required to. For youth protection purposes, scouts are not allowed to sleep in a tent with anyone but a parent or guardian. So, you would have to camp. (And I hate to camp!)
post #6 of 49
I also know enough that no son of ours would ever be a member. I believe this organization to be shameful.
post #7 of 49
My ds is a wolf cub - he's in 2nd grade. He was a tiger last year. For tigers, it was a requirement that a parent be at each meeting with their child. This year, that is not a requirement, though parents often stay, but many carpool, too. Our den meets twice a month. Our pack is very active. There is usually a pack activity going on each month (sometimes more than one), in addition to a monthly pack meeting. We've done some fun stuff with scouts. I agree that it is easiest to join at the beginning of the school year, but our pack also has a policy of not turning anyone away, so they would accept anyone anytime of year.

RBinTEX - congrats to your ds for being close to being an eagle scout! I know how much hard work goes into that.
post #8 of 49
I agree that the policy on homosexuality is indeed shameful. That whole thing hit the news when we were already knee-deep in scouts. It would have given me pause if I were joining for the first time. However, I couldn't (or rather decided I wouldn't) pull my son out of an activity he loved over a political issue he didn't understand, and really had no bearing on our actual group.


BSA does not promote Christianity. It does require the boy to have religious beliefs of some sort, and has religious badge programs for every imaginable religion. Prayers are said at each meeting, and the prayer leader is prohibited from using "Jesus" in the prayer, because we have lots of non-Christian boys. I wish scouts were open to atheist boys also. But it is a group founded with "duty to God" as one of its principles. BSA is a private organization, and may set its own rules.
post #9 of 49
And this is one aspect of its shamefulness.

It's saddens me when people only jump to fight for a cause when it only directly affects one of their own. So truly sad.

I also would not belong to an elitist organization, this too is shameful. I also could not be associated with a person who supported such organizations.
post #10 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty Diva View Post

I also would not belong to an elitist organization, this too is shameful. I also could not be associated with a person who supported such organizations.
O.K.
post #11 of 49
Do you deny they are an elitist organiztion? They include some and exclue others. Even if I wanted my son to be involved and evcen if HE wanted to be involved he couldn't. And because of our religious or lack of religious beliefs? So an atheist can't have morals or be ethical? Make good choices that involve his fellow man?

How could I support such an organization that discriminates against others? How could I support an organization who openly discriminates against gay boys and men? AND how can I support an organization who denies having troop leaders who have molested young boys?! Keep homosexuals out, but let pediphiles in?

I would never feel safe enough to let my son be involved in such an organization. it would be a risk I would not be willing to take.
post #12 of 49
I can't argue for the stance on homosexuality and religion except to say being a private organization, they can set their own rules. I don't like the rules of the Ku Klux Klan, so I won't be joining them.

In all fairness on the religion stance, they began as an organization based on duty to God. Therefore, they are a religious organization. I don't think non religious people would be interested in an organization that mentions God at every meeting.

Pedophiles have a creepy way of finding their way into any organization that involves children. They also become baseball coaches and school teachers.

BTW, BSA also excludes girls.
post #13 of 49
This has been a subject of many passionate and tearful discussions in our house. My DH grew up in the BSA, is an Eagle Scout, Order of the Arrow Member as is his father and brother. It's a VERY important organization to him. He is a wonderful, kind, compassionate, giving and loving man. He is a passionate defender of the outdoors and preserving nature. And quite a bit of this has to do with his involvement in BSA. The organization can, and does everyday, have a positive impact on the lives of young boys and men.

My DH is also a passionate defender of gay rights (as am I). For a LOOONG time I could not reconcile the two. And we fought many times whether any future sons of ours would participate in the BSA.

What my DH said makes sense, change isn't going to happen if everyone in the BSA thinks the same way (and they DON'T). My husband doesn't agree with the rules and he believes in the importance of change from within.

He was never aware of the BSA's standpoint on homosexual leaders while in BSA, only becoming aware of the "rule" when he himself became a scoutmaster. He doesn't like it or support it. But should any of his scouts have questions on why, he's there to answer them. I think that's important.

I'm not 100% comfortable with his involvement, but I do understand his point. It's going to take a lot of good leaders, like my DH, to change their viewpoints.

To the OP, I hope your son finds as much enjoyment in the BSA as my husband did! It was a very positive experience for him!
post #14 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBinTEX View Post
I can't argue for the stance on homosexuality and religion except to say being a private organization, they can set their own rules. I don't like the rules of the Ku Klux Klan, so I won't be joining them.

In all fairness on the religion stance, they began as an organization based on duty to God. Therefore, they are a religious organization. I don't think non religious people would be interested in an organization that mentions God at every meeting.

Pedophiles have a creepy way of finding their way into any organization that involves children. They also become baseball coaches and school teachers.

BTW, BSA also excludes girls.

Yes pedophiles can be found everywere, even at your next family reunion that is why you should be involved. I don't find this a worth wild arguement for any child hood activity, can't live in fear like that

And BSA does allow girls in their venturing program. GSA totally excludes boys and don't ever have a way to include them. Groups solely of one sex isn't horrible. At different stages and ages it is needed. I have been a BSA den leader and a Girl Scout leader. I don't disagree with the sex segragation at the early ages.

From what I am seeing there is enough BS members disagreeing and challanging and turning there heads to the "rules". If they all jump ship they miss oprutunity to touch and challange the kids. The organization would also loose a valuable resource of knowledge so it would greatly loose something when the change happens...and it will (even though a lot slower than I and most would like).
post #15 of 49
: My ds has been interested in scouts, I don't know alot about them. I was not aware of the stance on homosexuality or religion. We are pagan and we homeschool. I have been in contact with the local group and they can't seem to get past the homeschool thing, everything is organized by the schools and grades : He was so exited about joining something where he can camp...Anyone know of any alternatives?
post #16 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by faerierose View Post
: My ds has been interested in scouts, I don't know alot about them. I was not aware of the stance on homosexuality or religion. We are pagan and we homeschool. I have been in contact with the local group and they can't seem to get past the homeschool thing, everything is organized by the schools and grades : He was so exited about joining something where he can camp...Anyone know of any alternatives?
My husband suggests http://www.campfireusa.org/start.asp. He's just started to look into it. Co-ed and looks pretty good. He's always trying to find programs similar to BSA in case parents/kids are interested in outdoor programs without the religious aspect.
post #17 of 49
faerierose - I'll admit to knowing very little about pagan religions. But my DH said don't let the "reverant" aspect of BSA turn you away. By reverant they don't mean Christian, just a god, something greater than yourself. DH has had boys in his troops that have been Christian, Jewish, Muslim and he thinks even pagan.

Some troops are very focused on religion (and by that I mean Christian), but there are plenty of troops that don't stress religion much, or even at all.
post #18 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marsupialmom View Post
And BSA does allow girls in their venturing program. GSA totally excludes boys and don't ever have a way to include them. Groups solely of one sex isn't horrible. At different stages and ages it is needed. I have been a BSA den leader and a Girl Scout leader. I don't disagree with the sex segragation at the early ages.
there is no such thing as GSA, it is the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) and men/boys can be members, although I don't know of any who were actually in troops. I do know many dads and brothers who were members, though.
post #19 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by faerierose View Post
: My ds has been interested in scouts, I don't know alot about them. I was not aware of the stance on homosexuality or religion. We are pagan and we homeschool. I have been in contact with the local group and they can't seem to get past the homeschool thing, everything is organized by the schools and grades : He was so exited about joining something where he can camp...Anyone know of any alternatives?
Look into Spiral scouts!
post #20 of 49
With much hesitation and research, we let our son join the cub scouts this year. We are UU (with pagan tendencies).. anyone who knows what a Unitarian Universalist is will understand where our hesitations come from.

That said, the vast majority, and in our case 100% of the activities that our son was going to be participating in were things we approved of. The kids he would be hanging out with were his friends already. There was nothing scary for us.

We agreed that the organization itself needs re-vamping. While that is true, we also believe that change comes best from within and that our son has an awesome spirit that will only grow in this organization. I see him changing them WAY before they change him. He's just that kind of kid.

That said, he has loved every minute of every activity and, in turn, so have we. I'm glad he joined.
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