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Native American Mamas tribe - Page 22

post #421 of 598
Oh I am SO glad I found this.

I am half Lakota & my dh is half Mohawk. We live a trad life out here in Mohawk country. We are teaching the children the language (although we don't speak it perfectly, we are improving ourselves) We go to ceremony, we dance & sing & my husband is a firekeeper, he trained properly for many years.
You know all that stuff. We do live off rez, but near by which helps. Although we are looking at building much closer (like near the boarder but my dh wants good water access for the community farm so we don't have to rent farm land anymore. We are also politically traditional, we don't vote in non-tribal elections, we fight for our land & all that great stuff.
post #422 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by InaX5 View Post
Oh I am SO glad I found this.

I am half Lakota & my dh is half Mohawk. We live a trad life out here in Mohawk country. We are teaching the children the language (although we don't speak it perfectly, we are improving ourselves) We go to ceremony, we dance & sing & my husband is a firekeeper, he trained properly for many years.
You know all that stuff. We do live off rez, but near by which helps. Although we are looking at building much closer (like near the boarder but my dh wants good water access for the community farm so we don't have to rent farm land anymore. We are also politically traditional, we don't vote in non-tribal elections, we fight for our land & all that great stuff.
awesome! awesome! awesome!

Welcome
post #423 of 598
Ina - I want to teach my children some Lakota as I think it is the most beautiful language I have ever heard. They are part Algonkin, but I have yet to find any language learning aids for that language. Which ones would you recommend for Lakota?
post #424 of 598
Elders, only decent way to learn.
I know alot of Algonquin people (being that they are in this area too). I can ask them if they know of any resources. It's easiest to learn from people cause you need to here the pronouciations because many of the sounds are so different from english like the whole K - G thing that's in a lot of the NDN languages, as well as all the gluttal stops, & clipped k's, t's, d's, p's, etc. And it's hard to learn how to pronouce a "pt" sound unless you here it over & over. Do you live near a rez? that would help. My kids pick up Mohawk better because they here it more so learning the nearest language is easier.
post #425 of 598
I live in Maryland. We just went to a NDN festival and there were people from a near by rez there that I had never even heard about - sad, but true - we are going to their Powwows in Oct and Nov. Maybe we'll make some friends! I think the majority of people here speak Lumbee, or just plain ol'stinkin'English I don't have any contact with anyone other than online so so far all we know is Osiyo and Wado! which is a start but sad still - Lakota is beautiful. I heard Jana sing in it on her 'American Indian Story' CD and we have that song memorized. DH and I are thinking of moving to Vermont, so if that ever happens we'll be closer to everyone That is if he is in fact Algonkin...a few years ago it was thought that his family was Blackfoot...I wish someone would remember SOMETHING!!! : Aren't you so sick of what the gov't has done?!??! His Grandfather doesn't think there is any NDN blood left in his grandkids, so what's the point...so sad...

HOWEVER, with that said...ever since I've been here (in this tribe on MDC ) and meeting other NDN people online and in person, the more my DH has made sense to me...and his whole family! I am still looking for my NDN lineage, as I've heard as a kid that there was an 'NDN in the woodpile' (not a nice saying, but that's what I heard) but my family is from Michigan...that should pretty much sum up their attitude on the subject...oh well...I will still go to Powwow, learn all I can and be nice to all my relations! (and pray for sleep at 3am!!!)....
post #426 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjccheerdoll View Post
I'm not NA myself, but DP's entire family is Cherokee and therefore DS is as well.
Hi ,
Nice to see you. My DH is 100% Dine. My roots are purely European.

I check this thread once in a while but I don't post much.
post #427 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyHawk View Post
I live in Maryland. We just went to a NDN festival and there were people from a near by rez there that I had never even heard about - sad, but true - we are going to their Powwows in Oct and Nov. Maybe we'll make some friends! I think the majority of people here speak Lumbee, or just plain ol'stinkin'English I don't have any contact with anyone other than online so so far all we know is Osiyo and Wado! which is a start but sad still - Lakota is beautiful. I heard Jana sing in it on her 'American Indian Story' CD and we have that song memorized. DH and I are thinking of moving to Vermont, so if that ever happens we'll be closer to everyone That is if he is in fact Algonkin...a few years ago it was thought that his family was Blackfoot...I wish someone would remember SOMETHING!!! : Aren't you so sick of what the gov't has done?!??! His Grandfather doesn't think there is any NDN blood left in his grandkids, so what's the point...so sad...

HOWEVER, with that said...ever since I've been here (in this tribe on MDC ) and meeting other NDN people online and in person, the more my DH has made sense to me...and his whole family! I am still looking for my NDN lineage, as I've heard as a kid that there was an 'NDN in the woodpile' (not a nice saying, but that's what I heard) but my family is from Michigan...that should pretty much sum up their attitude on the subject...oh well...I will still go to Powwow, learn all I can and be nice to all my relations! (and pray for sleep at 3am!!!)....
i hear you on the sadness of not knowing your roots. i am having such a hrad time digging out what tribe my great grandfather was from. we have figured out that he was from canada, but thats where the trail ends...so frusterating. i want my son to know more about that part of himself. i am very connected to my other heritages (portugese and irish) and i want to feel some sense of connection to the native part of me...as i said in a pp, my whole life, people have asked me if i was native, and i always said no, because i didn't know my great grandfather was full blooded...i feel sad that i basically dishonored him by doing that. anyway, i just wanted to say i share your frusteration. peace.
post #428 of 598
anybody want to tell me how to make frybread? i am craving it so bad...there is a salmon cook today in Hoopa, but i can't make it and i want frybread...:
post #429 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellymama View Post
anybody want to tell me how to make frybread? i am craving it so bad...there is a salmon cook today in Hoopa, but i can't make it and i want frybread...:
check out this yahoo group - tons of Native recipes on
everything...fry bread, pumpkin fry bread to name a few

NDNcookingandhomemaking

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NDNcookingandhomemaking/
post #430 of 598
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellymama View Post
anybody want to tell me how to make frybread? i am craving it so bad...there is a salmon cook today in Hoopa, but i can't make it and i want frybread...:
I'll make you 50 pieces of frybread for one of those salmon. Yummy!

My "recipe" evolved over the years, guided by my mom, my MIL, and memories of my grandmother. It's rather simple, too:

Ingredients:

Unbleached flour, self rising if you have it (the unbleached part is important!)
a little salt
a little sugar
warm water
oil (I prefer a canola blend--some folks like to use melted lard or plain veggie oil. Just don't use regular canola or any other oil that has a lower smoking point as you'll end up with a burnt tasting bread)
time
patience


In a large mixing bowl, put your flour (eyeball it--depending on how much you want to make), a dash of salt, and a dash of sugar. Make a well in the center. Pour in some warm water and keep adding (mixing GENTLY) until you get the consistancy of a loose biscuit dough. Don't overmix as the bread will turn out tough. Cover and let sit for about 15-30 minutes.

Heat your oil to frying temp. Either pat the dough out between your two hands (like one would a tortilla) or pat the rounds out on a floured board. The rounds should be not too thick and not too thin. Thick will be dough-y (blech!) and thin will be crisp like a cracker. Your bread dough should be about 1/2 inch thick. A hole in the center is optional. Lower your bread into the hot oil. It should pop up to the top rather quickly. For best results, fry no more than two breads at a time (one is optimal). When the bread is golden brown around the edges, it's time to flip. After a min or so, check the color. If golden, remove and drain on paper towel, or on a wire rack. Keep as warm as you can (either by covering or with the stove on warm) until serving.

Those instructions were really wordy, but that's my method. Oh! And if you want a "healthier" version, you could use half whole wheat/half unbleached flour. I find it helps to add a little extra baking powder to make the whole wheat version lighter.
post #431 of 598
thanks!
post #432 of 598
Quote:
I want to teach my children some Lakota as I think it is the most beautiful language I have ever heard. They are part Algonkin, but I have yet to find any language learning aids for that language. Which ones would you recommend for Lakota?
http://www.alliance2k.org/daklang1/daklang1.html
This is a system a friend developed for teaching Lakota and Dakota. I think you have to hear it/speak it everyday to make it stick. I lived on my DH's reservation for 10 years before (quite suddenly) I could speak in phrases. It just took years of hearing it for it to sink in.
I'm non-Native, by the way. Dh and Baby are enrolled Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota.
post #433 of 598
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellymama View Post
thanks!
LMK how it turned out!


How is everyone else doing?
post #434 of 598
Subbing...and will intro after I get my kids school work going

Back...

I was separated from my father's family for 30 years. I located my siblings this year and have been talking with my dad as well. My grandmother was 1/2 Cherokee, she is the one that looked for me for almost 2 decades before she died. Family was everything to her. I'm told, and have seen pictures, that I look like her. I never took after my mother's side and could never place my features. My children run the range on features...everything from the palest strawberry blonde/blue eyed child to one child that has nothing but NA features. DP has some Cree in him as well, but much farther back. It has been wonderful being able to hear more family stories, FINALLY. Little is known of my great grandmother, but I'm planning on doing more research.

What is amazing is that my mother, not NA, was very interested in NA culture and somewhat instilled that in me on the side. My husband and I were encouraged by a friend in another state to participate in the local pow-wows. We came once, but not again due to a rough pregnancy I was going through and then a move across country. Being there, something spoke to me though, and this was before I found my father and family.

To answer a PP, yes we are considering the DNA test. My husband is actually the one that is really interested in it.

What does it take to be recognised by a tribe? And what would be some ways for me to teach our children actively about this part of their ancestry? I want my children to have a sense of cultural identity.
post #435 of 598
BTW, glad to see bellymama here...I have to say you encouraged me like you wouldn't believe on another thread...thank you!
post #436 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommaduck View Post
What does it take to be recognised by a tribe? And what would be some ways for me to teach our children actively about this part of their ancestry? I want my children to have a sense of cultural identity.
mammaduck - I am Ohkay Owingeh and work in the field of Indian Law. I don't know any tribe that acknowledges (or really cares about ) DNA testing. In fact, in my experience, most look down on it. What makes you Native is not simply blood, but culture.

I think it's great that you want your kids to grow up understanding their culture, but they do not need a DNA test to do that. They need you to get in touch with your people and maintain those ties to the culture and traditions of your people. Enrollment does not automatically do that for you.

Each tribe has their own qualifications for enrollment. Most tribes have offices that handle such inquiries, so you should contact them directly. Many have websites where you can find the info to get you started.
post #437 of 598
Thank you, Vivian. Just to clarify, I didn't think a DNA test had anything to do with being connected to a tribe...it was just something that had been mentioned by several people to my husband and he took interest.

I'll try looking into the Cherokee Nation website to start. We live in PA, so I'm not certain what we could get involved in nearby.
post #438 of 598
:aw shucks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mommaduck View Post
BTW, glad to see bellymama here...I have to say you encouraged me like you wouldn't believe on another thread...thank you!
post #439 of 598
I just saw this thread.

I am part Cherokee and Sioux.

I can't remember what kind my husband has, though.

Now, I will go read through it.
post #440 of 598
Thread Starter 
Video from the Denver Columbus Day Parade:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwK6meERA_k
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