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Native American Mamas tribe - Page 24

post #461 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackandchloe View Post

I had a pretty funny moment today at the store . My big boy was asked what his name was, and when he replied "Ziigwan", the lady sort of looked a bit odd, and then said to me "what's his real name?" I replied "Ziigwan", and she says "oh, that's... different...". Ziigwan piped up "it means springtime, when the waters are flowing on the ground and in the trees, and the geese come back. What does your name mean?" : I snickered to myself... :rofl: that lady looked even more uncomfortable. I think this new generation of little ones is pretty powerful, and is for sure coming out with guns blazing.

i love it!!!!
post #462 of 598
I have a question for you guys.

In light of the Blessingway threads floating around, I decided to search for Mohegan ceremonies that are similar. I am Mohegan -- I'm not just pulling a tribe out of the air. Unfortunately, I have very little involvement w/ the tribe because I live in TX now, not CT. My grandmother is more involved, but I'm not sure she'll know about a birth/new mother/new baby ceremony. I've never heard her mention it and the only ceremony I've ever known/been involved in I don't even know the name of or what it was for. (I was about 18, so it's been several years.)

I feel like any Mohegan culture that I was exposed to growing up is just a big jumble. I can't make any sense of it because it wasn't taught to me as part of my daily life. It was my grandmother who was the most involved and since I didn't live w/ her, I lived w/ my parents, I wasn't exposed to as much of my background as she was.

Additionally, I want to know what to do about naming my children. Their given names are in my signature, but what about their native names? It's my understanding that one is named after much thought and observing the child's temperament and personality. Also, I thought names could change, but I don't remember for sure. (Just a warning -- you will see that they are very very white. )

I've already been to mohegannation.org and it didn't have a whole lot of information for me. I want to know about sacred ceremonies and mostly I found just general info and news.

I would really love it if someone could point me in the right direction.

~ JTG/Doe Eyes
post #463 of 598
I don't know about Mohegan culture particularly, but here's how we did it at home. I gave an Elder tobacco in a tie, and requested that she name my baby. I did this while still pregnant. She prayed and dreamed, and then in a ceremony in our community lodge, she told us his name when he was a few months old. We had a feast and a giveaway, and it was done It was sort of the same way with my eldest, too, although the ceremony was done in our living room. Both of their names will probably change as they become adults (Bnajaaehns means Fledgeling, and that probably won't suit a grown man, : but it so works for my ducky baby), so they'll have to do that on their own, but that was the gist of it. I've seen Namings from a few cultures, and the core of them all are pretty similar, it's just the specifics that change (who speaks, Name sponsors or Aunties and Uncles, indoors or outdoors, time of day etc...). Is there an Elder you could go to and ask?

HTH!
post #464 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyHawk View Post
Welcome!!! well, welcome to posting in lieu of lurking

My DH is Algonkin and although we live in near DC I still would like my DC to learn some Anishnaabe. What learning materials do you recommend? My DC are 4 and 1.
I would recommend "Talking Gookum's Language", and any others by that author, and suggest that you and your DH learn it, then teach your kids That's usually the best way, is if parents are learning side by side with the kids
post #465 of 598
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackandchloe View Post
I had a pretty funny moment today at the store . My big boy was asked what his name was, and when he replied "Ziigwan", the lady sort of looked a bit odd, and then said to me "what's his real name?" I replied "Ziigwan", and she says "oh, that's... different...". Ziigwan piped up "it means springtime, when the waters are flowing on the ground and in the trees, and the geese come back. What does your name mean?" : I snickered to myself... :rofl: that lady looked even more uncomfortable. I think this new generation of little ones is pretty powerful, and is for sure coming out with guns blazing.
I LOVE it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justthatgirl View Post
Additionally, I want to know what to do about naming my children. Their given names are in my signature, but what about their native names? It's my understanding that one is named after much thought and observing the child's temperament and personality. Also, I thought names could change, but I don't remember for sure.
I couldn't tell you the answer for YOUR culture. Every tribe is a little bit different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justthatgirl View Post
I've already been to mohegannation.org and it didn't have a whole lot of information for me. I want to know about sacred ceremonies and mostly I found just general info and news.
You won't find information such as you're looking for on the internet. If you do, I would urge you not to trust that it's accurate. The best way to find out more about ceremonies and traditions (including your question about naming) would be directly from your people, your elders. If you approach people in a good way (offering a gift of tobacco is pretty much "globally" accepted), they will be willing to help you learn more.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jackandchloe View Post
I don't know about Mohegan culture particularly, but here's how we did it at home. I gave an Elder tobacco in a tie, and requested that she name my baby. I did this while still pregnant. She prayed and dreamed, and then in a ceremony in our community lodge, she told us his name when he was a few months old. We had a feast and a giveaway, and it was done It was sort of the same way with my eldest, too, although the ceremony was done in our living room. Both of their names will probably change as they become adults (Bnajaaehns means Fledgeling, and that probably won't suit a grown man, : but it so works for my ducky baby), so they'll have to do that on their own, but that was the gist of it. I've seen Namings from a few cultures, and the core of them all are pretty similar, it's just the specifics that change (who speaks, Name sponsors or Aunties and Uncles, indoors or outdoors, time of day etc...). Is there an Elder you could go to and ask?
How my ds was named in a similar fashion. He was born less than two weeks before ceremonies. I don't know when or exactly how, but my FIL approached one of the priests (a friend of the family) and asked him if he would perform the ceremony. Gifts were given as a token of appreciation. The family (FIL, MIL, dh, BIL, uncles, aunts, cousins...) stood with my ds in the lodge and the ceremony was performed there. I couldn't go in because I was still healing after the birth, but I could watch from afar. My dh was participating in ceremonies, so we celebrated both events with a meal after ceremonies were complete.

As an aside, my ds wore his first moccassins for the naming ceremony. The day we were living OK (just a few days later), I went to put them on him and they would not fit. He had grew that much in just a few short days!
post #466 of 598
Boozhoo jackandchloe,
I know what you're saying about not retaining the language that your students are trying to learn. This past January I started going to our community's language classes again. The people who attend are beginners right on up to fully fluent. My 3 yo DD goes to class with me and I find it very hard to retain anything. She keeps on talking to me and wants me to read and draw with her...good things I know, but make it difficult to hear the speakers. DH is going to start going to class with us now that he's home on parental leave. So, hopefully that'll make it easier for us to remember and bring the language into our home more.
As part of my summer job I helped to develop a community language survey. We had over 600 individual responses and the overwhelming majority felt that language was very important to them and their children. Our volunteer language group presented the survey findings to our Chief & Councillors and they all said "yes to working on keeping our language alive".
post #467 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Bear's Mama View Post
You won't find information such as you're looking for on the internet. If you do, I would urge you not to trust that it's accurate. The best way to find out more about ceremonies and traditions (including your question about naming) would be directly from your people, your elders. If you approach people in a good way (offering a gift of tobacco is pretty much "globally" accepted), they will be willing to help you learn more.
I will ask my grandmother who the elders are! Thank you.
post #468 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennbee View Post
Boozhoo jackandchloe,
I know what you're saying about not retaining the language that your students are trying to learn. This past January I started going to our community's language classes again. The people who attend are beginners right on up to fully fluent. My 3 yo DD goes to class with me and I find it very hard to retain anything. She keeps on talking to me and wants me to read and draw with her...good things I know, but make it difficult to hear the speakers. DH is going to start going to class with us now that he's home on parental leave. So, hopefully that'll make it easier for us to remember and bring the language into our home more.
As part of my summer job I helped to develop a community language survey. We had over 600 individual responses and the overwhelming majority felt that language was very important to them and their children. Our volunteer language group presented the survey findings to our Chief & Councillors and they all said "yes to working on keeping our language alive".

Aaniin! Aniish ezhiyaayin? Good for you, that you're relearning your language I teach in the public school system, and I find it tough since there's not much family help available to my students, aye? And it's awesome that your community is getting behind language revitalization! BTW, if the Unceeded Island is the one here in Ontario, that's where I did my teacher's college
post #469 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackandchloe View Post
Aaniin! Aniish ezhiyaayin? Good for you, that you're relearning your language I teach in the public school system, and I find it tough since there's not much family help available to my students, aye? And it's awesome that your community is getting behind language revitalization! BTW, if the Unceeded Island is the one here in Ontario, that's where I did my teacher's college

i'm from the southernmost unceded island, not wikwemikong. i think it's very important for parents to learn the language too if their child is. maybe an evening class could be offerred for the parents. the class could emphasize what the kids learn and offer ways on how to use the language in everyday situations.
post #470 of 598
My mom named the kids today!

Max is Lycosa, Wolf Spider, of the Mohegan Tribe & Nation, the Wolf clan.
Rachel is Meadow Lark.

We're waiting for Thomas's name.
post #471 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackandchloe View Post
I would recommend "Talking Gookum's Language", and any others by that author, and suggest that you and your DH learn it, then teach your kids That's usually the best way, is if parents are learning side by side with the kids
Thank you for the reference! Forgive my ignorance. I am just at the beginning of understanding and learning about NDN culture. Is Anishnaabe the language that Algonkins speak?
post #472 of 598
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justthatgirl View Post
My mom named the kids today!

Max is Lycosa, Wolf Spider, of the Mohegan Tribe & Nation, the Wolf clan.
Rachel is Meadow Lark.

We're waiting for Thomas's name.
Great! :

Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyHawk View Post
Is Anishnaabe the language that Algonkins speak?
http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe.htm HTH!
post #473 of 598
hey mamas, just found this tribe page. I just always went to my state tribe page...so good to see this up.
I am part turtle and part hawk and part other things depending on what is going on in my life, but I am also Cherokee and Irish. My nuclear family is known as the Wolf Pack.
I include my kids in any type ceremony that I officiate. Unless it is a Women's Council meeting. Then, I consider that my time with the women. But, here at the house we honor trees by planting them. We buried my ds's placenta in ceremony. I do art projects with women to practice conscious praying. I sit with myself and pray and have small ceremonies. We honor women about to have babies. So many ways to honor the earth and each other. So many ways to give.
I hold my head up proudly the best I can and humbly walk a path as a keeper of old ways. In the process of my walk I plant seeds.
Right now we are evolving to the next vibrational frequency and it is hard to walk or talk any other path than this for me. I can not stay in a drama filled, non-gentle atmosphere for more than just a little while. Anyone else experiencing a Shift internally and externally?
post #474 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Bear's Mama View Post
I love this site - I used to frequent it a lot when I had time to read! now I think what I want is music and stories on CD that we can just listen to. I have Jana's Christmas CD - so beautiful - anyone know where I can find stories and music to purchase?
post #475 of 598
Thread Starter 
post #476 of 598
mommyhawk,
i sent you a PM.
post #477 of 598

"I" Is Not For Indian

reprinted with permission

"I" Is Not For Indian

A 56-minute documentary proposal for Public Television
Film Synopsis By
James M. Fortier and Dr. Joely De La Torre
with the support of Oyate, Berkeley, CA
Education Documentary Now in Development

Download Complete Proposal

Program Description:

Synopsis

This 56-minute documentary will explore the social, cultural, political, and personal ramifications of how Native American histories, cultures, stories, and issues are "taught" in California public schools. Presented from a Native American perspective, we will explore the roots of appropriation and objectification of Native cultures and stories as a tool to oppress, assimilate, and acculturate Native peoples. Using personal and dramatic first hand accounts, we will reveal how Californian Indigenous cultures are still presented in California public schools in a way that homogenizes, caricatures, and stereotypes those cultures with damaging results for both Native and non-Native school children. Fundamentally, this is a film about storytelling, who gets to tell indigenous stories and at what cost to our children and communities? Although we are focusing on stories and issues pertinent to California Indians and schools, echoes of this story can be found in schools across the
country with historical roots and national implications leading us to believe that this documentary will have strong national audience appeal.

Introduction and Need

For decades, public education has led the way in producing generations of Native children with historically the highest dropout rates and lowest academic achievement levels nationwide. Low self-esteem, a lack of positive role models and little cultural validation in the curricula are a result of centuries of social, political, and cultural appropriation of Native peoples-particularl y in our public schools. This issue has never been adequately addressed on public television.

Every October in public schools across the country, children are taught that America was "discovered" by Christopher Columbus. "In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue…." or so the lesson goes. Paper replicas of the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria adorn classroom walls everywhere. In November, children make paper "war bonnets" and they learn the "story" of Squanto the "friendly Indian," and stage elaborate re-enactments of the so-called "First Thanksgiving. " In fourth grade California classrooms, students are required to make replicas of the Spanish Missions that enslaved Native people, and in schools across the country our children are taught that the westward migration and "sacrifices" of frontier "pioneers" were not only necessary to forge a new nation, but were honorable and preordained by "Manifest Destiny." The Native peoples who occupied those lands are presented merely as obstacles to be overcome for the greater good of the majority--primarily white
Euro-Americans. While these "lessons" attempt to paint a noble picture of American history from a predominantly white perspective, many Native American parents, educators, tribal leaders, and most importantly, American Indian children experience these lessons as yet more painful reminders that our cultures, histories, and issues continue to be reinterpreted and marginalized by the dominant society. The perpetuation of these myths as truths in the public school system has churned out generations of Native children growing up with the emotional and psychological scars of low self-esteem, and diminished cultural identity and helplessness; as well as generations of misinformed non-Native students leading to latent and overt anti-Indian racism.

Themes and Issues

We live in an era when as a society we preach tolerance, and on the surface we try not to condone the misrepresentations, inaccuracies, nor harmful stereotypes of a given culture when presented in our public institutions- particularly in our schools. Unfortunately, while it is generally agreed upon that our schools must deal more honestly with America's sometimes-painful past; the histories, cultures, and issues of Native Americans are still being presented through textbooks, children's literature, films and lesson plans that disregard accurate Native American perspectives, our interpretation of history and our input regarding what is culturally appropriate to be taught to non-Native children.

California, like many states, mandates a specific Native American curriculum that routinely sidesteps Native American input, brushes off Native objections, and continues in every grade a presentation of Eurocentric, one-dimensional, offensive stereotypes of Native histories and cultures. This curriculum, along with a never-ending stream of biased textbooks continues to embarrass, shame, and belittle California's Indigenous people, especially children. Furthermore, non-Native authors "retelling" Native American stories predominantly write the thousands of non-fiction and fiction books presenting Native American cultures and histories. Although our stories belong to us, they are seen by the dominant society as "public domain." This mining of our stories is nothing less than cultural theft on a massive scale, leading to cultural genocide. This denial of our right to self-determine who we are has led to an estrangement of tribal identity for many of our people.

Why do professional educators continue to allow, and in many cases condone, the offensive and inaccurate way all of our children are still taught Native American histories, cultures and issues? This 56-minute documentary will explore that question. We will begin with a close examination of the roots of these negative stereotypes, the history of objectifying and marginalizing Native American cultures, and the historic use of presenting a biased history of Indian-white relations as a tool of repression and assimilation of Native peoples-specificall y in our schools. We will provide emotional first hand accounts from California Native children and their parents who have struggled within our public schools in an attempt to shed light on these issues-and the often- hostile reception they receive.

"I was in my daughter's classroom…the class was reading The Courage of Sarah Noble, and I saw my daughter squirming in her seat. So I picked up the book and saw why. As she was heading out for recess, she started to cry and told me that the kids were making fun of her and no one wanted to play with her because she was Indian… All I could do was hold my daughter. I remembered reading books like this when I was her age, and I remembered my own pain. The teacher's response was, "I can't believe you're taking this so seriously." She said, "Lighten up, it's only a book."… The principal…started hollering at me, said I was implying that his staff was unprofessional, that the book would not be on the state's recommended reading list if it were not acceptable." --Native American Parent

Our film will demonstrate that this story, sadly, is not an isolated incident, but rather the norm. Historically, American education has been used as a tool to destroy Native cultures, and not a means to celebrate our rich diversity and positive contributions.

Humanities Advisors

We are working closely with a core group of academic advisors whose background and knowledge in the fields of Native American education, mental health, culture, history, and social science will provide the necessary expertise to present the complexities of these issues and stories in a compelling and engaging manner suitable for public television audiences, (see Project Personnel attachment). Furthermore, we will rely heavily on the guidance and input provided by or non-profit fiscal sponsor, The California Indian Museum and Cultural Center, whose community and educational work in the area of California Indian history, education, and cultural interpretation will be essential in expressing the views and perspectives of California Indians throughout this project.

Project Status

We began developing this program five years ago as a PBS documentary. Initially we were going to include profiles and stories from across the country. Budget and logistical considerations have impressed upon us the need to narrow our scope to California Indians and curricula. However, we are confident that the fundamental issues will have a broad national appeal. Some research and development has already been accomplished by James Fortier and Dr. De La Torre at our own expense. A pending grant request from the Community Technology Foundation of California would provide funding to continue research and development of the companion interactive website, as well as to begin videotaping personal testimonials and story profiles. These video clips would be streamed on the interactive website, and will eventually be used to produce an 8-10 minute "clip" or sample tape used for further fundraising for the documentary. We have already identified some stories and profiles that will be
included in the documentary and on the website. Additional money is needed to complete this research, which will include travel expenses, archival research, story development, interviews, and consultation fees. The next step would be to go into full production.

Conclusion

Fundamentally, this project seeks to foster social discourse through various avenues of storytelling, leading to community and self-empowerment. This program, via a national PBS broadcast, as well as the ancillary interactive website and print material, serves to inform, enlighten and inspire change through honest interpretation from a historically underrepresented segment of society, California Indians and Native Americans in general. This "call to action" will empower the American Indian community, and California Indians and educators in particular to become more actively involved in the education process from a local to national level. Parents, teachers, students, and grassroots advocates will be encouraged to get involved to make a positive change in their communities. This project will provide easy to access, yet powerful communications tools for them to bring about enormous beneficial changes in the ways all of our children learn about Native American histories,
cultures, and issues.

Through the tragedy of 9/11 the world has once again witnessed the best and the worst of mankind. It is now more important than ever to foster a society built upon human dignity, tolerance and mutual respect for all our diverse voices. When a single white author (Tony Hellerman) sells more books "about" the American Indian experience than all Native authors combined we are robbed of our authentic Native American voice. The same holds true for textbooks and children's literature, and as a result our children suffer when it is time to teach about "Indians." Native communities suffer from the related social ills of a poorly educated people. Furthermore, society suffers because as long as Native peoples do not control the dissemination of their own stories, histories and cultures, then the authentic voice of Indigenous peoples will remain quiet and what we as Native peoples have to offer to the larger society, to the world even, will remain solely with us. In the absence of our
authentic voice the children of this country will continue to be taught half- truths and outright lies. They will continue to make paper war bonnets, plaster adobes and Spanish Missions. They will perpetuate the myths of Columbus, the First Thanksgiving, and of Manifest Destiny, and they will grow up thinking "I" is for Indian when it really stands for ignorance.

You can download the complete proposal as a PDF document.

You can contact us for more information at 650-738-1834.

Edward Omahkataayo, Esq.
74 Albion Vale Rd.
Glen Eden, Auckland
New Zealand 0602
Ph.011-649- 818-0688
E-mail: cougarmaster2001@ yahoo.com

If you have a chance to make life better for others and fail to do so, you are wasting your time on Earth. No matter what our station in life, we are here to serve, even if that sometimes means making the greatest sacrifice of all.

Sooner or later you are going to learn just as I did, that there's a difference between KNOWING the path and WALKING the path.
http://www.theupcn. com/
http://www.freewebs .com/yona- adatiya/
post #478 of 598

momma in need

I came across this email on the NDNcookingandhomemaking yahoo group of an Ojibway momma in need on the Red Lake reservation. If you are close by and/or have the items she needs, it's getting pretty cold out there fast! here is the email, reprinted with permission.

...............

----- Original Message -----
From: Tracy Morrow
To: NDNcookingandhomemaking@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 3:58 PM
Subject: [NDNcookingandhomemaking] Ojibwa family

Dear Group,

My dear friend is a counselor at the Red Lake reservation in Minnesota. I wanted to share with you the following letter asking for help. If this is not appropriate on this list, please forgive me. I thought that if there were any Ojibwa relatives here that they might want to know they have family members that need their assistance this year…

I called Virginia today and she told me that the family needed
very badly, a blanket for each person, and a pillow not to mention boots,
gloves, mittens, coats, and hats. They do not have proper clothes for this season.
Do you have gently things you can donate or is your family or school reaching
out to families in need? This is a traditional Ojibwa family, a mother in her 20's
working hard to support herself and five children on her own. Here are their
names again and ages.
Manuelita age 10, size 3 and 1/2 to 4 in shoes.
Carmelita age 8, size 2 and 1/2 to 3 in shoes.
Aketzelia age 7, size 2 to 2 and 1/2. These three are girls.
Junior is 6, a boy and wears little boys 13. He also wanted you to know he loves Spiderman.
Nathaniel is 5 and wears size 13 too, and loves Batman.
The children like learning and teaching games or tools and would like beginning Spanish materials.
I hope I am not asking too much. Remember how blessed you are and keep in mind Red Lake
Reservation lives 200% below the national average on poverty, can you imagine? I know
you care and will consider giving hand me downs gently used and in good condition, or
maybe you will send something to them.
I deeply appreciate all whom sent clothes and gift certificates over the summer and they
received such nice clothes to wear for that season. I appreciate your love and support
and know I miss all of you deeply. Please forward if you know someone whom might help.
I still love my work here and my Red Lake Nation children, it has changed me for-ever.
Love to you.

Donna Hrabcakova
P.O. Box 1299
Red Lake, MN. 56671

Thank you for your attention to this. I’m not sure what I’ll be sending out yet, I’m thinking of a couple of blankets.

Blessings,

Tracy
post #479 of 598
hi, i have a question. I hope this doesn't offend anyone here, but I don't know who else to ask.

I have always been told that I had Cherokee ancestors. No one in my family has ever tried to get on a tribal roll though. Me and my grandmother did a lot of research a couple of years ago and concluded that we couldn't be counted due to all of our ancestors leaving the tribe before the trail of tears. (They married white people and hid their ancestry due to persecution). When I was a child, my mom wanted to learn and teach us the traditional Cherokee stuff, but whenever she tried people were really rude, and said we were just white people who were gawking and stuff. It really hurts to feel like I have to be excluded from EVERYTHING just because my name isn't on some roll that the government wrote up after they had already scattered everyone. I really want my kids to be able to learn the traditional ways and to be able to feel like they are a part of the tribe instead of growing up feeling like they have to be ashamed because their name isn't on the list and so they can't "prove it". Is there any way that anyone here knows of that we can be included without necessarily having to "be" Cherokee? I don't care about getting stuff from the government or anything like that, I just want to learn and have the community.
post #480 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Bear's Mama View Post
Any other Native American Mamas out there? Post here!
HELLO! i'm native american. Pottawatomie Indian to be exact. I've danced since I was a little girl, just stopped a few years ago. Hopefully I will get back into it eventually after the babe is here, I would like him to dance and to experience the culture as well.
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