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Native American Mamas tribe - Page 29

post #561 of 598
Hi ladies, I'm Apache, but long story really short know very very very little about my history. I have been working on my family-tree for going on 8 years now and have my maternal side (white side) dating back to the 1500's. But everything for my paternal sides ends with my grandparents, the first born off the reservation (so I'm told). I can't find anything! My grandparents have passed and my dad, aunts/uncles (etc) and I haven't spoken in 17 years.

I would really like to fill in those missing blanks. Does anyone have good resources for finding tribal history (birth/death records)?

I know the tribe is in New Mexico, I know Apache, I have first names of great-grandparents... I don't know much else.

Any help? Where should I look for more info?
post #562 of 598
I do not know if I have any Native American blood in me. I'm estranged from my Christian white mother and I never met my father or heard much about him.

I have done a lot of research on the history of Native Americans though and this way of life really resounds with me, so I will be subbing this thread and hoping to learn from you all. I find it challenging to instill values of respect for the Earth and nature in my children in this modern world but I will not give up trying.
post #563 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennbee View Post
I have had one weird experience recently while NIP. I was playing in a co-ed baseball tournament and had to nurse my DD during a break. A young man walks by, looks and says "go do that at home". I replied "is that what you do at home?". He was walking away and he laughs and says "give me some doodoo". That's what we call it around here. I said "you wish, ya pervert". Now here's the background on this young man. He has down syndrome, drinks, parties, and talks really offensively. I may have been a little rude, but I didn't care to educate at the moment. There were a lot of people around that didn't seem to care about me NIP, just him. Another guy said that I shouldn't have bothered to say anything to the rude guy.
Have any of you heard any bad remarks from anybody about NIP?
I was nursing my infant in the E.R. when she had a finger injury and a nurse was trying to force me to put a blanket over her head. I was peeved, and I refused.
post #564 of 598
A lot of Cherokee are Christian also.
post #565 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommaduck View Post
A lot of Cherokee are Christian also.
After I posted initially, I figured someone would say that. I obviously have a lot to learn which is why I will mostly be reading and not posting.
post #566 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Bear's Mama View Post
My family and I met the South route. Great fun! The guys had their picture taken with Dennis Banks afterwards.
That's awesome!! I wished they had kept a better track of the happenings on their website...maybe next time...do you know when that will be? Hopefully not in another 30 years
post #567 of 598
Announcement:

Registration for Tsalagi/Cherokee Language Classes is open!!!

http://www.cherokee.org/Culture/Language/Default.aspx
post #568 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyndoula View Post
Hi ladies, I'm Apache, but long story really short know very very very little about my history. I have been working on my family-tree for going on 8 years now and have my maternal side (white side) dating back to the 1500's. But everything for my paternal sides ends with my grandparents, the first born off the reservation (so I'm told). I can't find anything! My grandparents have passed and my dad, aunts/uncles (etc) and I haven't spoken in 17 years.

I would really like to fill in those missing blanks. Does anyone have good resources for finding tribal history (birth/death records)?

I know the tribe is in New Mexico, I know Apache, I have first names of great-grandparents... I don't know much else.

Any help? Where should I look for more info?
Here are the official sites for the two major Apache bands in New Mexico. Send them a letter, maybe they can help.

jicarillaonline.com

http://www.wmat.nsn.us/
post #569 of 598
Hey, I'm Aniishanaabe from Northern Minnesota. I'm new to this forum.
Just stopping by to say hello to all the other Native moms.
post #570 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelvicious View Post
Hey, I'm Aniishanaabe from Northern Minnesota. I'm new to this forum.
Just stopping by to say hello to all the other Native moms.
Osiyo, Aniishanaabe!
post #571 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelvicious View Post
Hey, I'm Aniishanaabe from Northern Minnesota. I'm new to this forum.
Just stopping by to say hello to all the other Native moms.
Another northern MN mama popping back in- whereabouts?
post #572 of 598
I'm from Nett Lake, but I am living in Blaine right now. After the baby is born in July, we are moving back up north, maybe Hibbing or Duluth.
post #573 of 598

Stop Racism against Native Americans in Childrens book

Racism in Waldorf Alphabet Book

Please let Bell Pond Books know that it is racist to place Native American people in the same category as objects and animals.

Bell Pond Books is the publisher of "Waldorf Alphabet Book". It is an alphabet picture book with an "Indian and two "Inuits" as part of the images for the letter "I". All other images in the book are of animals, objects, or of non human beings such as a mermaids and a gnome.
Imagine if we said "B" is for Black (with a black person
depicted e.g. with a Gangster Rap outfit?) "J" is for Jew (e.g. with a
Hassidic Jew depicted?). It does not read very well does it? This kind of objectification of Native Americans directs the young mind of the reader to view them as sub-human, etching a stereotype into their little psyche's that will shape how they view Native People's as they grow into adults. This has been an acceptable form of racism in American culture for years and it is time to stop it NOW.

What you can do

1. Email the CEO of Bell Pond Books and let him know that you want the images edited out or the book to stop being published all together.
Gene Gollogly gene@booklightinc.net
Here is a sample that you can copy and paste (or you can write your own letter)
Dear Mr Gollogly,
It has come to my attention that one of your publications, "Waldorf Alphabet Book" has racially inappropriate images of Native Americans in it. Due to the socially damaging impact of these images, I ask that you promptly edit out the images or stop publishing this book altogether.

2.Email the bookstores who carry this book and ask them to remove this item from their catalog.
Here is a sample that you can copy and paste:
It has come to my attention that one of the books that you carry in your store has racially inappropriate images of Native Americans in it.
It is titled "Waldorf Alphabet Book".

Under the letter "I " it depicts an "Indian" and two "Inuits". All other
images in the book are of animals and objects. This subtle form of racism
objectifies Native Americans making them like objects in the minds of the
young reader. Imagine if we said "B" is for Black (with a black person
depicted e.g. with a Gangster Rap outfit?) "J" is for Jew (e.g. with a
Hassidic Jew depicted?). It does not read very well does it?

Due to the socially damaging impact of these images, I ask that you promptly
remove this book from your catalogue. These images are appropriate if all
the alphabets were depicted with people of various races, without using any
old clichés and stereotypes.


Due to the socially damaging impact of these images, I ask that you promptly remove this book from your catalog and help the world see all people as equal.

http://www.escapadedirect.com/contact.html

http://www.littlebits.com/product_in...em_number=L839
info@littlebits.com

http://www.spiritualityandpractice.c...s.php?id=15643
brussat@spiritualityandpractice.com

http://www.blueberryforest.com/readi...habet-book.htm
customerservice@blueberryforest.com

http://www.palumba.com/product/107
hello@palumba.com

http://www.overstock.com/Books-Movie...i_sku=10625960
feedback@overstock.com


3.Make online review of this book

4.Boycott the book

5.Share this email with others.

I have corresponded with Gene Gollogly CEO of Bell Pond Books about this matter. The response was no. If you would like to see the origianl correspondence with him let me know and I will gladly email it to you.
Thank you
Mary Betsellie
post #574 of 598
In 1999 a Native American writer, born fragile and poor on a destitute Indian reservation, published an essay, "The Blood Runs like a River Through My Dreams," in Esquire. It earned a National Magazine Award nomination and was later expanded into a memoir of the same title that became a finalist for a PEN/Martha Albrand Award. That rez-to-riches tale of courage and redemption sounds like a Horatio Alger story, doesn't it? It should be a movie. Or at least an episode of A&E's Biography. Of course, I'm biased, because, well, it's my story. Kind of.

I did not write "The Blood Runs like a River Through My Dreams." But raised fragile and poor on the destitute Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State, I published a story, This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona, in Esquire in 1993. My story, which features an autobiographical character named Thomas Builds-the-Fire who suffers a brain injury at birth and experiences visionary seizures into his adulthood, was a finalist for a National Magazine Award and the basis for the film Smoke Signals, which won the Audience Award at Sundance in 1998.

Nasdijj, the one-name author of The Blood Runs like a River Through My Dreams, claimed to be the son of a Navajo mother and a white father. His memoir features a child named Tommy Nothing Fancy who suffers from and dies of a seizure disorder. Quite the coincidence, don't you think?

Of course, after reading Nasdijj's essay and book, I suspected that he was a literary thief and a liar. As a Native American writer and multiculturalist, I worried that Nasdijj was a talented and angry white man who was writing as a Native American in order to mock multicultural literature. I imagined that he would eventually reveal himself as a hoaxer and shout, "You see, people, there is nothing real or authentic about multicultural literature. Anybody can write it."

Angry, competitive, saddened, self-righteous and more than a little jealous that this guy was stealing some of my autobiographical thunder, I approached Nasdijj's publishers and told them his book not only was borderline plagiarism but also failed to mention specific tribal members, clans, ceremonies and locations, all of which are vital to the concept of Indian identity. They took me seriously, but they didn't believe me.

And how do I feel now that the author of an investigative story in L.A. Weekly believes that Nasdijj is a fraud and actually a white writer named Timothy Barrus? Vindicated? Well, sure. I dream of leaving "I told you so" messages on many voice mails, although unlike James Frey's publisher, who initially supported his lies and moral evasions about his exaggerated memoir, A Million Little Pieces, Nasdijj's publisher dropped him because of personality conflicts even before the L.A. Weekly story came out. Of course, Frey has sold millions of books and will probably sell a few million more. Nasdijj hasn't sold millions of books, and he will probably fade into obscurity. In response to the L.A. Weekly story, Nasdijj posted a rambling statement on his blog saying that people should pay attention to "real scandals" like poverty.

So why should we be concerned about his lies? His lies matter because he has cynically co-opted as a literary style the very real suffering endured by generations of very real Indians because of very real injustices caused by very real American aggression that destroyed very real tribes. He isn't the first to do it. In 1991 the American Booksellers Association gave its book-of-the-year award to Forrest Carter's Cherokee-themed memoir, The Education of Little Tree, despite the documented fact that Carter was really Asa Carter, a rabid segregationist and the author of George Wallace's infamous war cry, "Segregation today! Segregation tomorrow! Segregation forever!"

I can only hope that Nasdijj's readers will look to Oprah for inspiration. After initially defending the essential truth of Frey's memoir, a selection for her book club, Oprah changed her mind, admitted that she had been duped, invited Frey back onto her show and called him a liar. When was the last time a public figure like Oprah admitted to being wrong? When was the last time a powerful person like Oprah issued a genuine public apology? I think all the people who profited from Nasdijj's fraud should take heed of that lesson and issue public apologies to Native Americans in general and to Navajo in particular. And I hope we won't be waiting for that apology as long as the rivers flow, the grasses grow and the winds blow.

-- Sherman Alexie, a member of the Spokane tribe, is the author of 17 books, including Ten Little Indians, his latest
post #575 of 598
You know, now that I think about it...Abeka does the SAME THING. Hmmm....doubt I could get them to listen though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamapits View Post
Racism in Waldorf Alphabet Book

Please let Bell Pond Books know that it is racist to place Native American people in the same category as objects and animals.

Bell Pond Books is the publisher of "Waldorf Alphabet Book". It is an alphabet picture book with an "Indian and two "Inuits" as part of the images for the letter "I". All other images in the book are of animals, objects, or of non human beings such as a mermaids and a gnome.
Imagine if we said "B" is for Black (with a black person
depicted e.g. with a Gangster Rap outfit?) "J" is for Jew (e.g. with a
Hassidic Jew depicted?). It does not read very well does it? This kind of objectification of Native Americans directs the young mind of the reader to view them as sub-human, etching a stereotype into their little psyche's that will shape how they view Native People's as they grow into adults. This has been an acceptable form of racism in American culture for years and it is time to stop it NOW.

What you can do

1. Email the CEO of Bell Pond Books and let him know that you want the images edited out or the book to stop being published all together.
Gene Gollogly gene@booklightinc.net
Here is a sample that you can copy and paste (or you can write your own letter)
Dear Mr Gollogly,
It has come to my attention that one of your publications, "Waldorf Alphabet Book" has racially inappropriate images of Native Americans in it. Due to the socially damaging impact of these images, I ask that you promptly edit out the images or stop publishing this book altogether.

2.Email the bookstores who carry this book and ask them to remove this item from their catalog.
Here is a sample that you can copy and paste:
It has come to my attention that one of the books that you carry in your store has racially inappropriate images of Native Americans in it.
It is titled "Waldorf Alphabet Book".

Under the letter "I " it depicts an "Indian" and two "Inuits". All other
images in the book are of animals and objects. This subtle form of racism
objectifies Native Americans making them like objects in the minds of the
young reader. Imagine if we said "B" is for Black (with a black person
depicted e.g. with a Gangster Rap outfit?) "J" is for Jew (e.g. with a
Hassidic Jew depicted?). It does not read very well does it?

Due to the socially damaging impact of these images, I ask that you promptly
remove this book from your catalogue. These images are appropriate if all
the alphabets were depicted with people of various races, without using any
old clichés and stereotypes.


Due to the socially damaging impact of these images, I ask that you promptly remove this book from your catalog and help the world see all people as equal.

http://www.escapadedirect.com/contact.html

http://www.littlebits.com/product_in...em_number=L839
info@littlebits.com

http://www.spiritualityandpractice.c...s.php?id=15643
brussat@spiritualityandpractice.com

http://www.blueberryforest.com/readi...habet-book.htm
customerservice@blueberryforest.com

http://www.palumba.com/product/107
hello@palumba.com

http://www.overstock.com/Books-Movie...i_sku=10625960
feedback@overstock.com


3.Make online review of this book

4.Boycott the book

5.Share this email with others.

I have corresponded with Gene Gollogly CEO of Bell Pond Books about this matter. The response was no. If you would like to see the origianl correspondence with him let me know and I will gladly email it to you.
Thank you
Mary Betsellie
post #576 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelvicious View Post
Hey, I'm Aniishanaabe from Northern Minnesota. I'm new to this forum.
Just stopping by to say hello to all the other Native moms.
Boozhoo, I'm Anishinaabe too. I'm somewhere in southern Ontario.
post #577 of 598
Welcome!
post #578 of 598



My grandmother says we are Apache as well, but that cannot be proven.


Edited by Sol_y_Paz - 10/11/11 at 11:36pm
post #579 of 598
I have a question that maybe you ladies can help me with. First of all, my name is Nina. My grandmother is Cherokee. Her family left the reservation and settled in the mountains of TN. I have been recently exploring shamanism. I had my power animal retrieved by a shaman last night and I am unable to find the meaning of the animal. She was somewhat stumped too- she said she has never seen this animal in retrieval before.

My power animal is a blue ox with really, really long horns.

I would really appreciate any assistance with this.

thank you so much :-)
post #580 of 598
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~threemoons~ View Post
I have a question that maybe you ladies can help me with. First of all, my name is Nina. My grandmother is Cherokee. Her family left the reservation and settled in the mountains of TN. I have been recently exploring shamanism. I had my power animal retrieved by a shaman last night and I am unable to find the meaning of the animal. She was somewhat stumped too- she said she has never seen this animal in retrieval before.

My power animal is a blue ox with really, really long horns.

I would really appreciate any assistance with this.

thank you so much :-)
Ok, am I the only one to think of "Paul Bunyan and Babe" when you said that? What an odd power animal! Awesome too I would love to be able to find my totem. I *think* it might be a bear, but not sure.
Ayway, I hope you can find an answer to that. Maybe my sort of answer helped? Who knows Good luck !
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