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lotus birth or eating the placenta?

post #1 of 80
Thread Starter 
Is it an either or situation? Which do you choose and why? Or do you choose both?
post #2 of 80
we're thinking lotus birth with no eating placenta, but if i were to eat the placenta, one bite would be enough, and i would take it from the "back" of the placenta--the part which was most connected to me--rather than a part closer to the baby.

i don't see why one can't do both, except from the philosophical perspective that 'the placenta belongs to the baby' and we dont' want to take things from the baby.

but if placenta eating AND lotus are a big deal to you, then i don't see why one can't do both.
post #3 of 80
I think both is sorta possible, but that's only because lotus birth is on a wide continuum(sp?).
I'm 100% an eat the placenta sort of person, but I don't see why the cord needs to be cut until at least after the placenta is born.
Unless I am bleeding heavily I plan on waiting until after the first nursing session and cuddle-settle-in has happened before doing anything to the cord and taking time to eat anything.
It's not *really* lotus, but it is a little and it's in the spirit of lotus birth.
post #4 of 80
I have been looking at lotus for my next babe, but I've got to ask why you would eat the placenta. I'm sure there is something I'm missing and would love for you mamas to clue me in.

Thanks!
post #5 of 80
Thread Starter 
From what I've heard, the placenta is an excellent source of nourishment for the postpartum, nursing mother. It also seems to me that it is natural... at least for some species (deer). Does anyone know of documented placenta-eating among primitive peoples? And, eating it can help clue the body in to stop bleeding, if you are hemorraging.
post #6 of 80
Neither for me.
post #7 of 80
Thread Starter 
Great reply! Of course I should have said: "or neither?"!
post #8 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malila View Post
From what I've heard, the placenta is an excellent source of nourishment for the postpartum, nursing mother. It also seems to me that it is natural... at least for some species (deer). Does anyone know of documented placenta-eating among primitive peoples? And, eating it can help clue the body in to stop bleeding, if you are hemorraging.
It also has lots of hormones in it. It helps slow bleeding and I suspect that it may play a role in bonding.
Here is a link about comparative placentation--it's the index to their articles on the animals [they've/that have been?] studied. You can scroll down to the primate section and there are many to read. Not all have the info on placentophagy(placenta eating) because that wasn't their main goal, but they often say whether or not the placenta is eaten in that species.
http://medicine.ucsd.edu/cpa/indxfs.html

Here is a link about the bonobo chimpanzee from that site http://medicine.ucsd.edu/cpa/bono.html




Haha, Do'h I origionally read your post "does anyone know if there's documented placenta eating in primates. . ." instead of primative peoples. Good think I re-read.
I'm not a big fan of that term(primative peoples).
Here's a link to that though http://www.tidesoflife.com/placenta.htm
and you may be able to find some stuff here about that http://www.placentabenefits.info/articles.asp
post #9 of 80
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I will def. check out those links.

Thank you for sharing your opinion on my word choice. What words would you use?

I have the utmost respect for the first peoples. Seriously. "Primitive" has a bad rap, but many people use it to describe sustainable, earth-centered, everything that our modern culture has progressed away from to its demise. Aboriginal, indigenous, earth-centered, native....
post #10 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malila View Post
Thanks! I will def. check out those links.

Thank you for sharing your opinion on my word choice. What words would you use?

I have the utmost respect for the first peoples. Seriously. "Primitive" has a bad rap, but many people use it to describe sustainable, earth-centered, everything that our modern culture has progressed away from to its demise. Aboriginal, indigenous, earth-centered, native....
What would I use? Hmmmmmm that *is* a toughy. Did you mean peoples who lived >10,000 years ago or did you mean it as current living populations that live without all this modern crap? I don't mind it too much when in reference to people 10K YA(mostly because I have NO clue what I would say except "people living X number of years ago"). I think my initial reaction to your post was because it's used so much in reference to people living *today* and then it almost always carries that bad rap you talk about as if they are dumb or something (when they're not the ones destroying our world). I don't know what you would use for people living today, other than their name and location.
Sorry to derail


Oh and I don't know of any archiological evidence about placenta eating. I've asked but have always gotten "I don't know"s. I suspect it would be more difficult to find evidence of placentopahgy than it would be for some other placental practice, KWIM?
post #11 of 80
Thread Starter 
I meant people who lived >10,000 years ago. Thanks for your comments on language use.
post #12 of 80
Sorry my reaction was as if you were using it about people today--I don't know why I would assume that.

I'm really curious too if anything is ever found that indicates the placenta was eaten. I suspect nothing will ever be found about that. But who knows. . .Wasn't there some species of Homo that had evidence of canabalism? (not that placentophagia should be compared to canabalism really) But if they were eating eachother then I suspect placenta eating probably happened too. Maybe that's not a logical/fair leap though.
post #13 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synchro246 View Post
Sorry my reaction was as if you were using it about people today--I don't know why I would assume that.

I'm really curious too if anything is ever found that indicates the placenta was eaten. I suspect nothing will ever be found about that. But who knows. . .Wasn't there some species of Homo that had evidence of canabalism? (not that placentophagia should really be compared to canabalism really) But if they were eating eachother then I suspect eating placenta probably happened too. Maybe that's not a logical/fair leap though.
No worries!

Cannibalism? Haha. I don't know, but it just made me think that the authorities probably might freak out about eating placentas...

How would you eat a placenta? Raw? Smoothie? All of it?

I liked your post earlier about being able to eat the placenta but still remain the respect and mood of lotus birth. i'm sure some people would not agree, but I think I do.

I am just fascinated with this topic (as well as up/uc)!
post #14 of 80
Definitly raw for me. My origional plan was to do the V8 smoothie. I reallllly like V8. One woman I encountered on here had her husband cut it into small chunks that she didn't even have to chew and she said they went down really well. I think I might to that for about a cup's worth like that shortly after the birth then have another cup's worth in a smoothie over the following few hours. I doubt I'll eat all of it. I will probably bury the rest under a tree in honor of my son. That ritual always resonated with me.
post #15 of 80
the hormones in the placenta help the utereus clamp down, which slows bleeding. I am not a "placenta eating" kinda person, but if I was having problems with heavy bleeding right after birth, I would take a bite. For the medical affect, all that is needed is one small bite from all that I've read. Its an "old midwives trick".
post #16 of 80
I don't see why you couldn't use a sterile curved medical clamp and sterile scalpel to remove a piece from the edge of the placenta without doing anything to the cord. I wouldn't "bite off" a piece unless the cord had been severed (since the mouth is definitely not sterile), but my plan is to have the tools present to safely divide off a piece of placenta if there is any concern regarding maternal bleeding (or if I feel like it for any other reason). In any case, I plan to practice non-severance of the cord.

It does seem ideologically inconsistent to cut a piece of placenta away from the baby, especially since there are reports of placental sensitivity in newborns; however, if placentophagia is to be practiced, it seems more generous to the baby to cut the placenta itself and take only what is needed, rather than taking the entire placenta by cutting the cord.
post #17 of 80
Both, I would consume what I needed from the maternal side of the placenta and leave the baby side alone.
post #18 of 80
We used TCM to prepare our dd2s placenta. I really feel it helped in a variety of ways - less lochia, milk came in fully by day 3, bonding, emotionally etc. I will definetly do it that way again.

But we didn't cut the cord right away either. We waited for the placenta, and then some.
post #19 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by punkprincessmama View Post
We used TCM to prepare our dd2s placenta. I really feel it helped in a variety of ways - less lochia, milk came in fully by day 3, bonding, emotionally etc. I will definetly do it that way again.

But we didn't cut the cord right away either. We waited for the placenta, and then some.
What is TCM?
post #20 of 80
Eating it benefits you, but not as much as I think lotus birth benefits the babe.
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