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I'm a Reggio Teacher - Page 2

post #21 of 63
DS is in a reggio emilia preschool and I am *thrilled* with it and now the search for his K-5 or K-8 school is on... any tips on finding a similar philosophy in private elementary? because if I knew where to look, I'd scheudle a tour ASAP.

I'm looking at schools in the reverse way now- finding them by name or reveiws, but without a resource that groups them by philosophy. As I write this out, it's obvious I just need to ask people at his current school. ok... i must just be nervous about kindergarten!
post #22 of 63
hello there i am a mommy of three and worked at the only Reggio school in Louisiana, actually New orleans- Gris Gris house before Katrina. I'm glad to see this thread hope to learn more and contribute....
post #23 of 63
Where did you go to school to learn to share the day with kiddos in the reggio style?
did you self-study or take courses at a higher learning centre??
post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by love2all View Post
Where did you go to school to learn to share the day with kiddos in the reggio style?
did you self-study or take courses at a higher learning centre??
You know I just kind-of stumbled upon reggio. I was working as a preschool teacher for a very progressive director. I don't think she knew it but she was already on the road to Reggio.

Anyway I started taking classes to get my degree as an early childcare teacher. The FIRST class I took was a child development class. The teacher happended to show us a film of the actual Reggio school in Italy. It took my breath away. It was like I had found the missing puzzle piece.

After that I tried to self-study and incorporate the Reggio philosphy into a few diffrent schools I worked at. It never worked, the schools were all to traditional.

Finally I moved to a larger city and took a whole class on Reggio. It was WONDERFUL! The teacher even taught us in the Reggio style. I was in heaven!

From there I hooked up with one of two Reggio schools and began teaching there. The first couple of years were like kind of like an apprentice ship. I struggled to unlearn everything I had not only learned in the five years I had been teaching but in my own school years. But I wanted to learn so badly, and I am so thankful I stuck with it. Being a Reggio teacher has made me a better mother and changed the way I look at life.

So this is how it happended for me.

I know there is an online school that teachs Reggio and is very credible. I will try to find out the name.
post #25 of 63
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post #26 of 63
I also just stumbled on a Reggio preschool for my middle daughter who is 4. When we walked thru the door we both feel in love! It was idyllic. Orginally I thought she could go one day a week (we are homeschooling her elder sister and we have a baby boy), but we signed up for the full three day program WED-FRI because it was so fabulous.

I thought my eldest went to a good preschool but this is WAY better!
post #27 of 63
I had the pleasure of hearing Lella Gandini (the US liasion for the RE program and author of many RE books) speak at my son's school last month. Words can't explain how great it was.

We feel very blessed to be in a RE program that extends through 5th grade - and hoping that they extend it beyond that by the time he gets to 6th grade!
post #28 of 63
The Reggio approach is very much child-led in the sense that it respects and supports the child's ability to instinctivily "know" which paths to follow in order to learn those things s/he needs to learn at each developmental stage. This, of course, requires an environment conducive to exploration, play, discussion etc... Giving your children the time and opportunity to explore those things which interest them will open new avenues all the time. Things tend to snowball quite organically. RE education can be quite expensive but simply slowing things down and watching where your kids want to go (in terms of their interests) is a good place to begin at home.
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollytheteacher View Post
300 a month is cheap compared to Vermont. At my reggio-school it's 220 a week!
WAIT! You're in VERMONT?!?!?! WHERE?I realize you said there is a 3 year waiting list, but one vermont mama wants to know more!
post #30 of 63
Keep in mind our school is full time and offers veggie lunches, breakfeast like snakes, and afternoon snacks.

I think a lot of reggio schools are more like a preschool. Where we are a NAYEC approved childcare.

I think that is why it cost so much more.
post #31 of 63
Does anyone know of any RE schools in Raleigh NC? There are 2 in Durham/Hillsborough, but we are on the other side of the city, too far. I am honestly thinking of relocating the whole clan to find decent education options.
post #32 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommietime View Post
Does anyone know of any RE schools in Raleigh NC? There are 2 in Durham/Hillsborough, but we are on the other side of the city, too far. I am honestly thinking of relocating the whole clan to find decent education options.
Let me think about it. There must be. I know of at least four in Durham, two in Chapel Hill, and one in Hillsborough. I'm on the Reggio list serv. Do you want me to post a question for you? If so, let me know some details about what you are looking for (half/full day, preschool or infant/toddler, etc.)
post #33 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by terranova View Post
subbing since i am very much interested in learning what the reggio approach looks like in practice. i'm in bc and it doesn't seem like many people have heard of it here. i have a pipe dream of manifesting a reggio inspired preschool here in nelson.

amy
Doesn't sound like a pipe dream to me. Sounds like a wonderful idea!
post #34 of 63
I am SO interested in RE and am seriously thinking about going to Italy to learn more!

I ordered the Hundred Languages online, so I am looking forward to reading it. Are there any online videos or other good resources?

Thanks so much!!

P.S. Hi Amy!
post #35 of 63
I do not want to sound negative at all-and yet I am a bit bitter about a community of schools that are supposed to be reggio inspired where gossip and cruelty seem the norm. Vermont taylors, I am speaking of the Middlebury area. One postermentioned that education is not that important. I will respectfully disagree. Unless someone has done the emotional work of working out their demons and leaving them at the door then they can be very destructive in the school setting. Education is often a balance to that. Professionals learn ethics, boudaries and respect as core curriculum. I see teachers without so much as an associates who are great, and those who are mean, evil tempered, back stabbing people. No guarantees. This I have struggled with for a very long time,

Education and the committment to work on being able to be challenged and be willing to challenge others is so important.

So back to Reggio. The explanations were great. but as in any other setting, it falls apart with evil spirited people and inadequate directorship. Nature and beauty remain cornerstones for the philosophy.

It is a lovely concept in the care and well being of our children. There are core beliefs that need to be adhered to. Reggio is a beautiful philosophy on the approach of education of young children. It may resonate to us here because it parallels our own parenting styles. Rearch the teachers well is all I can say. In Vermont I am happy to point others in the direction of information.
post #36 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtomany View Post
I do not want to sound negative at all-and yet I am a bit bitter about a community of schools that are supposed to be reggio inspired where gossip and cruelty seem the norm. Vermont taylors, I am speaking of the Middlebury area. One postermentioned that education is not that important. I will respectfully disagree. Unless someone has done the emotional work of working out their demons and leaving them at the door then they can be very destructive in the school setting. Education is often a balance to that. Professionals learn ethics, boudaries and respect as core curriculum. I see teachers without so much as an associates who are great, and those who are mean, evil tempered, back stabbing people. No guarantees. This I have struggled with for a very long time,

Education and the committment to work on being able to be challenged and be willing to challenge others is so important.

So back to Reggio. The explanations were great. but as in any other setting, it falls apart with evil spirited people and inadequate directorship. Nature and beauty remain cornerstones for the philosophy.

It is a lovely concept in the care and well being of our children. There are core beliefs that need to be adhered to. Reggio is a beautiful philosophy on the approach of education of young children. It may resonate to us here because it parallels our own parenting styles. Rearch the teachers well is all I can say. In Vermont I am happy to point others in the direction of information.
Wow, it sounds like you had a very bad experience. I think I know of the school you are talking about.

Here is the thing about being a "teacher" (I use air quotes because I am not really fond of the term, I often learn just as much from the children as they do me.) your right people who work with children and families need to leave their garbage at the door. There is no room for being mean to children at any time. Do you need to guide them sometimes? Sure. But we certainly don't need to insult or harm them.

That being said teachers are humans too. We need to except that sometimes they will get frustrated, sad, or even angry. That's okay. What we need to make sure is that we check our selves and model healthy ways to get these emotions out.

I think there are a couple of things parents and other community members can do to support the teachers. Some of them simple some of them more complicated. Remember preschool teachers often make less then people working at McDonalds, they often do not have health insurance or any sort of retirement plans, they also work long hours at a job where you are on and giving all the time. So thank them. Ask them how they are. Take up donations for items the school needs. Send them on educational retreats to keep them fresh. Burn out is high in this neck of the woods. If you want to be even more active go to early childhood education day at your local state house. Show how important early childhood is.

The regulations are changing; soon it will be required for you to have a master in early childhood to be a head teacher. Good luck paying back those loans at $9 an hour.

Degrees are important they’re is much to be learned in school but I am not entirely convinced that if you don't have the consciousness to deal with your feelings without hurting others that they can teach you that. Honestly, I learned more from my teaching peers then from any class in this regard.

Again, I'm sorry you had such a bad experience. I have worked in the environment you describe (not reggio but traditional) and I have seen teachers be emotionally abusive towards children, weather they have a degree or not your right it is something to look out for.
post #37 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by *Devon* View Post
I am SO interested in RE and am seriously thinking about going to Italy to learn more!

I ordered the Hundred Languages online, so I am looking forward to reading it. Are there any online videos or other good resources?

Thanks so much!!

P.S. Hi Amy!
That book is great. We used it in one of my classes. I have looked for Reggio videos and haven't found any. If anyone does I would love to hear about it.
post #38 of 63
Any RE preschools in Boston, Cambridge area? Feel free to PM me!
post #39 of 63
do you have more links? what about curriculum for people who want to follow the principles at home? We had been looking at trying to get a waldorf co-op going,hiring a teacher and rotating through parents helping out, but the cost was just too prohibitive.

And what about continuing for the older children? I'm finding that most of these kinds of philosophies seem to drop off after the kids get older, or you have to try to piecework something together. We had hoped to have 2 classes, a 3 to 6 and a 7 to 10, but couldn't get it together so now, we are looking at more incorporating it into homeschooling and homeschooling co-ops.
post #40 of 63
subbing...
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