or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Green Living Tribe - Part II
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Green Living Tribe - Part II - Page 37

post #721 of 752
Did a new thread get started? Or did interest just peter out?
post #722 of 752
Good question...I fell out of touch for awhile because I was travelling and then super-busy, but it's been slow for awhile.
post #723 of 752
I would love to join this thread thanks for making it. I try to live green. It make me proud that my children they are 5 and 3 and ahalf know what is recycable and what can be used for compost pile (even thought in base housing you cant have one)and what can be thrown away. I love it we will be moving soon back to missouri and will be gardening and living even more green so any ideas you all want to throw this way would be great thanks.
post #724 of 752
I wanted to mention a green (re)discovery I just made... in a moment of weakness, I was thinking about getting hot rollers for my hair. : (I'm not so worried about the electricity, more the "consuming another thing" side.) But then I stumbled across a mention of rag rollers somewhere, and I tried it, and major . Basically, cut some rags out of an old sheet (~6" x 1" each). In the evening, with hair that is slightly damp, wind up sections of hair that are ~2"x2" (smaller if you have long hair). Tie with rag. Sleep. (Easy to do; they won't come out, and you won't disturb your hair.) Curls in the morning. No cost, no hair damage, not a lot of time involved.
post #725 of 752
I'm here...I've just been going through some major family stuff (not with hubby - in MY crazy, dysfunctional family).
post #726 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by KKmama View Post
I wanted to mention a green (re)discovery I just made... in a moment of weakness, I was thinking about getting hot rollers for my hair. : (I'm not so worried about the electricity, more the "consuming another thing" side.) But then I stumbled across a mention of rag rollers somewhere, and I tried it, and major . Basically, cut some rags out of an old sheet (~6" x 1" each). In the evening, with hair that is slightly damp, wind up sections of hair that are ~2"x2" (smaller if you have long hair). Tie with rag. Sleep. (Easy to do; they won't come out, and you won't disturb your hair.) Curls in the morning. No cost, no hair damage, not a lot of time involved.

Woo hoo, I was considering buying rollers too, now I have got to try this!
post #727 of 752
I'm subbing! I'd like more information on using rag rollers, 'cause I've read up on it online and every time I just seem to tie my hair into the rag and then I'm in pain trying to get the darn thing back out!
post #728 of 752
I have always used socks instead of rags.
post #729 of 752
Re the rag rollers:
-My hair was slightly damp, not *wet* or 100% dry (I used a wet washcloth to dampen each section of hair I combed out).
-The rags were ~1"x6". They were old pieces of a flannel sheet.
-I rolled my hair around my fingers, then stuck the rag through the middle of the loop, then did a half-knot (dunno what the official name for that is, but eg, when you're tying a square knot, you make 2 ties; I made one)
-I didn't have probs getting them out in the morning, I think probably because I didn't do any elaborate tying. Maybe put most of your hair up on your head, and do the bottom/back *first*?

I want to hear about the sock method.

One thing I want to try is to make a flax setting lotion. My grandmother (who had the same hairstyle from the 20s till she died several years ago) used that faithfulling to set her waves. I think what she did was just soak a small amount of flax seeds in some hot water, and when the water got goopy enough, she strained off the seeds. (You have to keep it in the fridge, and it only lasts ~a week, so don't make much.) She'd comb it into her hair before she put in the clips to style her waves.
post #730 of 752
the sock method
-your hair needs to be damp
-separate about a 2in piece of hair
-hold the end of the piece against the sock and roll up together
-tie the ends of the sock together

does that make since?
I think the socks are easier to get out because they are thicker, they don't tangle as much.
post #731 of 752
I have a ? for you all.
My mother told me an idea for going more green. She told me that when I wash my dishes to use a dishpan then after i am done with the dishes to take the water outside and water any plants that are out there. it will work on indoor plants as well. My ? is do they actually have what is called a dishpan and if so were do you get it at.
I was also wondering about a rain barrel were do I get that and do I have to have something special. My big concern is misquitos we have skin problems wihich get more inflamed if we get bit then the average person (dont have a clue why) so that is a big concern. Thanks for any answers you gals have.

Also wanted to say that the rag curlers work great. But was wondering if anyone has tried to curl your hair with cans. just wondering i havent yet since my hair has always been pretty short but now it is long and wanted to try it. Again thanks for any answers.
post #732 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by clothdipemomof2boy View Post
I have a ? for you all.
My mother told me an idea for going more green. She told me that when I wash my dishes to use a dishpan then after i am done with the dishes to take the water outside and water any plants that are out there. it will work on indoor plants as well. My ? is do they actually have what is called a dishpan and if so were do you get it at.
I have seen plastic dishpans at grocery stores in the plastic-y stuff section. I think you could also get one at a camping/outdoor supply store. They are very inexpensive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by clothdipemomof2boy View Post
I was also wondering about a rain barrel were do I get that and do I have to have something special. My big concern is misquitos we have skin problems wihich get more inflamed if we get bit then the average person (dont have a clue why) so that is a big concern. Thanks for any answers you gals have.
Your concern about mosquitoes is a good one--we have West Nile Virus here, so we're concerned about it, too. If your rain barrel has a cover and is fed by a downspout from your roof, you probably won't have much of a problem with mosquito larvae. I think the uncovered standing water is the big concern. (But maybe someone else has better information.)
post #733 of 752
Can I join? We try to live as possible:-) We are currently in the middle of switching all our lightbulbs to long-lasting flourescents. We recycle, have Energy Star appliances, cloth diaper, breastfeed, eat organic, buy local, practice voluntary simplicity, etc... can't wait to watch this thread!:
post #734 of 752
Joining too

For the mosquitoes, our neighbor has a bunch of rain barrels and uses mosquito disks (AKA dunks)- They slowly release B.t.i. (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis), a soil bacteria tested and found lethal only to mosquito larvae, black flies and fungus gnats. B.t.i. is active over a 30-day period. All other organisms should be unaffected.
Here is one site that sells them - http://www.cleanairgardening.com/mosquito1.html but I am sure you can find them else where.

For the dishpan water, you need to make sure you are using environmentally friendly soap otherwise you will just kill your plants We bought our pan, unfortunately plastic, I think at Kmart(I know, I know).

DS, almost 5, helps with the composting, recycling, and gardening(I can't wait to start!!!!). He gets so much enjoyment helping and learning We, primarily me, limit any chemically stuff in the house. Baking soda, vinegar, hyrdogen peroxide are about all I use to clean. Oh, well I like my Ecover dishwashing liquid too. It's also great mixed with water and sprayed on plants to keep the darn aphids away!!

When we can FINALLY build our own houes, DH is an Architect, it will be wonderful to really have a "green" house. DH is also concerned about the environment and urban sprawl so this will be just awsome when the time comes.
post #735 of 752
We definetly use eco friendly dish liquid. Atleast i hope so it is seventh generation. Thanks for all the tips. I will have to check out those disks and get the dish pan thing and try it. Thanks I will be getting them soon and trying it out. you all are great I am so glad I came to find this thread.
post #736 of 752

Paperstone countertops?

Anyone have any knowledge or experience with Paperstone countertops? We just bought an older house and are renovating the kitchen. It sounds like Paperstone is a nice green option for counters and it's made locally here in Seattle so that's a plus, but it does contain a small amount of formaldahyde in the adhesive. According to Paperstone's Web site, this small amount does not emit VOCs. Should I be concerned?

Also, if anyone has any tips for greening up an old house, I'd love to hear them. Neither myself or DH have lived in an older house before. We would eventually like to update some of the windows when we can afford it.
post #737 of 752
Hi again! We live in an old house (really old...built in 1904!) and we are in the process of greening it....I'd say you are on the right path with starting with the windows Really, to green an old house just make updates as you can to make it more effecient (replace broken floor boards, insulation, etc.)
If you want you can pm me:-)
post #738 of 752
Quote:
Originally Posted by mallieandjoolsmum View Post
Hi again! We live in an old house (really old...built in 1904!) and we are in the process of greening it....I'd say you are on the right path with starting with the windows Really, to green an old house just make updates as you can to make it more effecient (replace broken floor boards, insulation, etc.)
If you want you can pm me:-)
Thanks! I just might pm you...our house was built in 1906. We will be moving there from a house built in 1988 - gulp.
post #739 of 752
We just moved into our house a week ago. We're renting a big old stone farm house built in 1884!! The windows were replaced around 10 years ago--it's great! We moved from a "newer" farm house, maybe 80 years old or so, and the windows there were terrible! We had plastic on, blankets on top, seals around the edges, but that just helped keep the gusts out, it was still draughty.

The heater here seems to be more efficient too. We're trying to keep the temp at about 16C in the day. I still have to get used to actually changing it for night...we had a wood stove in the other house which heated all the time except for the coldest nights when it couldn't keep up. But hooray for spring coming!
post #740 of 752
Here's a huge thread on using rain barrels and other rain collecting info. One poster even said they use goldfish to control the mosquito larvae:
http://idigmygarden.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5153

Shonda
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Mindful Home
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Green Living Tribe - Part II