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Which is harder, dogs or kids? - Page 4

post #61 of 107
My sister and her husband have two dogs, no kids. They say its preparation But the dogs might be the only "kids" they ever have .My sister has a heart condition that could make pregnancy very dangerous. She is scared to TTC and they are not planning to any time soon. Honestly I'm gonna say kids are easier. I had a miniature pincer who would not housebreak and demanded to be let out at 5am every morning. My 7 month old sleeps longer than she did! Whenever my dad and stepmom visit they always say "well we better get back home, doggies need to be let out". At least you can potty train a child. Scooping up doggie doo out of the yard, well- stinks! I'd rather be washing diapers
post #62 of 107
We have a dog and a baby. I think that there are unique challenges and frustrations in taking care of my dog, and unique challenges and frustrations in raising my son. Is one more difficult than the other? I don't know. There are things that are easier to do with my ds, and there are things that are easier to do with my dog. But I do think that making a lifelong commitment to a companion animal, standing by him/her during illness, training, teaching, feeding, washing, brushing, etc., etc., while not comparable to the level of love and dedication you have for your child, can open your eyes to what it is like to be responsible for the nurturing and care of a being other than yourself.

One could argue that if actions speak louder than words, I have apparently decided that a dog is harder than a baby since this will be our last dog for a looong time, while we do intend on having at least one other child. And I would never have a puppy again.
post #63 of 107
Babies, hands down.
post #64 of 107
Quote:
Please be aware that many people love their pets and consider them to be family. I think we need to respect that we're all different and that's okay.
I guess that makes us even, because I find this offensive.

I have a dog. A very well loved and well cared for dog. So well loved and cared for that, oh forget it, I'm not going to justify myself.

My point with the comparison was to say that there is no real analogy in comparing caring for an animal and caring for a human being. I was not saying that a dog is akin to a piece of furniture. In fact, a more careful read of the remaining bit of my post in theory would have let a person know that I don't think this is the case since I talked about worrying about my dog.
post #65 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzysprite View Post
I don't have children yet, but I have to say that when people scoff at the love that I have for my pets, it hurts a little bit. I firmly believe that as someone who yearns to lavish love on a child, I've transferred some of those same types of feeling to my pets. I don't know if anyone who hasn't been both infertile and a pet lover would really understand where I'm coming from on this. If I vocally compare my pets to children, I'm usually joking (I have a dry sense of humor, so it's not always obvious), and it's a way of participating in a parenting conversation without having to talk about my struggle to get pregnant. I'm quite sure that it's harder to take care of a human child than it is to raise dogs, but I don't see anything offensive in looking at our pets as substitute children. It's how many of us childless people get by.
I can completely empathize with that, I know people who have had fertility issues and weren't able to have children. Their pets became their 'kids'. And that is completely okay by me. They've latched on to their love for their pets because they desperately want to care for and 'raise' another being, to feel that they have brought up a well-mannered and pleasant animal (human or canine) that brings them, and others, joy. So I understand where you're coming from.

The thing I don't understand, however, is how those who are adamantly childfree, bordering on child haters, also have pets and refer to them as their 'kids'. It doesn't make sense to me! I thought their whole line of reasoning for not wanting kids is that they're too expensive, time-consuming, needy, etc.. but yet they treat their pets as 'kids' and lavish all kinds of attention and money on them and reschedule their lives around their pets. It boggles my mind that they don't see the irony in that! :
post #66 of 107
my dog is harder, so much harder...
post #67 of 107
DOGS. (Assuming the dogs live inside the house.)

We got a puppy around Christmastime that we were going to keep in the house, and I literally cried every day for three weeks before deciding she HAD to go outside. It was infinitely more stressful dealing with a dog than with my children.

Of course, the role of parenting an actual human being is much greater than the responsibility of taking care of a pet, but on a day-to-day level, dogs are much more stressful, at least in my opinion/experience.
post #68 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post
DOGS. (Assuming the dogs live inside the house.)

We got a puppy around Christmastime that we were going to keep in the house, and I literally cried every day for three weeks before deciding she HAD to go outside. It was infinitely more stressful dealing with a dog than with my children.

Of course, the role of parenting an actual human being is much greater than the responsibility of taking care of a pet, but on a day-to-day level, dogs are much more stressful, at least in my opinion/experience.
What was she doing that was so stressful? Anything she could possibly outgrow or get training for? Living outside really is not idea for dogs ... they need to be with their "pack," and some can get pretty neurotic when isolated.
post #69 of 107
No one is ever going to hand the keys to the car to their 17 year old Labrador retriever tell them to have a nice evening an be a nervous wreck all night long, waiting to hear them open that front door and be home safe and sound.
post #70 of 107
I had to chuckle when I saw this thread. I was just thinking back to my premarital counseling sessions. We spent the whole five weeks arguing about how we treated the dogs (no kids yet). I would just sob because he wasn't as patient and as loving as I was...

I imagine our therapist thought we were nuts...

As to which is harder..I think it depends on the dog and the baby. My dog was much easier to handle then my DD...my sister's dog was more difficult then her babe...
post #71 of 107
Puppies are harder than infants (I can't nurse them when they whine, infants don't destroy most things when they chew on them, I don't have to potty train a baby). But children are harder than dogs (assuming you taught your puppy well).
post #72 of 107
I'm surprised anyone would say kids are easier. I used to have a border collie. She was a super high energy dog with some quirky fears who was obsessed with playing fetch - not an easy dog by any means. But she fit into my life easily. Having a baby dramatically changed my day-to-day life in a way no dog ever could. There are all kinds of things I love that have become nearly impossible for me ever to do since having kids. I can't leave the kids in the house alone while I go rollerblading or visit a bookstore, or leave them with relatives while I travel overseas, or take them along on wilderness backpacking trips, the way I used to do with my dog.
post #73 of 107
Haven't read many of the posts...
I think it's a tie, in some respects...

Dogs are harder on the household, physically, for longer, I think, & can do more damage; big dogs being especially difficult just on a an immediate level. Ex: putting the dog out before guests arrive so she doesn't wake the baby barking when the bell rings, making sure the house is DOG proofed and/or kennel training, house-breaking, etc... all of these things required for me a bit more energy than raising my babe does. But long term the dog kinda learns, and that's that, she goes on auto pilot, I don't have to make adjustments to my style, maintain a secure attachment by tweaking my practices throughout the years, and adapt my life around her changing personality the way we do with kids... dogs are dogs, and past puppy-hood, it's much easier to manage the doggy status quo.
post #74 of 107
I used to hang out at a lot of dogs park before ds was born.

I have yet to hear anyone mention how their libido just isn't what it used to be before adopting their pet, because they are too tired and feeling touched out by the end of the day.

Yea, I'd laugh if someone told me that. No disrespect to animal lovers. Our dog is part of our family too. But he's never made my nipples bleed, or had me to the brink of insanity with sleep deprivation.
post #75 of 107
This thread brings to mind the following story, which I hope that someone besides me finds funny...our childless neighbors adopted an Akita last year from a rescue organization. They had to provide SIX letters of reference. When we adopted our daughter, we were only required to have THREE.

They do seem to be very good "parents" to their dog, by the way...
post #76 of 107
Really, it depends on when you ask me ... there are moments when I swear the dog will be the death of me! But generally, kids are harder. If nothing else, you can go out and leave a dog home alone. Not so much an option with the kids, you know?
post #77 of 107
I think they're each difficult in their own way; dogs can be pretty intense for the 1st couple of years, & they'll always be dependant on you, whereas kids have a much longer dependency period, yet eventually grow up

FWIW, I was there for the entire birth process of each of my current 3 personal dogs (DH's was a "foundling"), taking their dams to the fertility clinic for cooled semen AI (sires were out of state), did CPR on puppies born limp, slept by the whelping box for about 3 months, was constantly washing dirty bedding, mixing baby cereal & goat's milk for weeks to supplement (& wiping it off 8-10 big fuzzy puppies), was up at every squeak to make sure mamma didn't roll on one (100 lb mom - 1 1/2 lb pups), walking momma dog evey few hours through the night (the metabolic rate is incredible, & right after birth, you're not only wiping lochia off the mom, she often has loose stools), soaked my & visitors' footwear in bleach to avoid Parvo virus, screened homes, kept in touch w/new owners, worried about health screening results, chauffered pups to obed. class & conformation class 2x/week (after work, an hour's drive each way, for at least a year), trained daily (rain or shine) for 1st 2 years, took them to matches or shows on weekends (often hours away, sometimes on plane flights), emergency vet bills, hurrying home after work to take care of them, DH & I never went on trips together (because someone had to stay & take care of the pets); not exactly like children, but certainly good preparation, I think
post #78 of 107
Go easy on childless couples & their "babies". My DS was born just before our dog turned 2. Before that, our dog (lab mix) was our baby. The thought of her dying one day was too much to bear and it was hard to imagine loving a child more (even though I knew I would I just couldn't imagine what it would feel like). At the time she filled our hearts and she was good preparation for having a child. We were already used to planning our lives around someone besides ourselves and that is probably one of the biggest adjustments when having a child that we didn't really have to make.

My DS as a baby and toddler was harder than my dog as a puppy but both were enjoyable. At this point I think getting a cat would be more trouble than having another baby! My DS loves cats (and I do too) and would love it if we got one, but they don't travel well and we take our dog almost everywhere we go. I'll take being up with a baby over trying to arrange cat care every other weekend & constantly worrying about the cat getting out any day!
post #79 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by artgoddess View Post
No one is ever going to hand the keys to the car to their 17 year old Labrador retriever tell them to have a nice evening an be a nervous wreck all night long, waiting to hear them open that front door and be home safe and sound.
Thank you Art - I was just reading thru this thread shaking my head in confusion.:
post #80 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeteaa View Post
kids are "harder" but dogs are more of a "inconvienece". I love both my dogs and kids. but there are so many restrictions for dogs, hotels, air travel, parks, city streets, rental cars, stores, etc. they can cost as much as kids, but you can't claim them as a dependant.
I agree with this. I can't take my dogs to public places but I can take my kids (although some folks would argue children shouldn't be in certain public places either). It's much harder to find a place for the dogs when it comes to vacations (usually they end up at grandma's and that is an entirely different issue)--of course, the kids are harder during the vacation with us! LOL!
In the end, it would depend on the nature and temperment of the dogs, kids and adult owner/parent as well as the lifestyle.
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