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Car seat culture in Europe - Page 2

post #21 of 147
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post #22 of 147
Well, can you turn them off? If not, you feel okay about having a five year old in the front seat, where they could be killed from the air bag deploying in an accident ?
post #23 of 147
I can't think of any situation in which I'd take DD out of her car seat while the car is moving. Of course, I'm also the kind of person who won't move my car out of the driveway when I'm blocking in DH without putting on a seatbelt! It just feels wrong to me to have the car moving and no belt on.
post #24 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jwebbal View Post
Well, can you turn them off? If not, you feel okay about having a five year old in the front seat, where they could be killed from the air bag deploying in an accident ?
I always turn them off, thankyou.
post #25 of 147
Nother blunt post here...

My mom is a paramedic. She has picked a dead baby up off the freeway whose parents were shattered because the mom had taken the baby out of the car seat for "just a second". The mom, dad and sibling who were properly restrained where unharmed, except for the devastating loss of the baby.

My mom has seen what airbags to do children. Again it is not a pretty picture. Children belong in the back seat, never in the front seat.

When you have a baby CIO... you leave the baby alone to CIO. You check in, but pretty much ignore your child. When DD is crying in her car seat, I am right there to talk to her and to turn on Johnny Cash for her. Again, I tell her what is going on, and why she must stay in her seat. I tell her how many stoplights to go, etc. I tell her how much I love her and how I must keep her safe. When we get where we are going she gets big hugs.

I don't believe that I am emotionally harming her. However I believe that parents who transport their children unrestrained are irresponsible, full stop. If the child is crying that badly get off the freeway and pull over in a parking lot.

No amount of cultural justification will change my mind. My job as her mom is to protect her safety first. Last time I checked, the laws of physics applied the same in the US as in Europe.
post #26 of 147
I could have written the same post intorainbowz. My partner is an ER nurse, and she has heard the stories of paramedics spending an hour looking on the side of the freeway for a dead baby who was ejected in a crash. Or the improperly restrained child (front seat five year old, no booster, just a seat belt) who ended up a part of the dash after an accident. Sorry Ersbett, I am not trying to pick on you, seriously, it happened. I am glad you can turn your airbags off, but my child won't be riding in the front of the car until at least 13, probably a few years after that even. Unrestrained children end up dead in accidents, it is a fact of life. I have learned many ways to comfort my child while driving a car, music being the biggest one. Like I said, too many stories from my partner's work, where kids end up dead, and she ends up witnessing the results of these children not being restrained properly.
post #27 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jwebbal View Post
I could have written the same post intorainbowz. My partner is an ER nurse, and she has heard the stories of paramedics spending an hour looking on the side of the freeway for a dead baby who was ejected in a crash. Or the improperly restrained child (front seat five year old, no booster, just a seat belt) who ended up a part of the dash after an accident. Sorry Ersbett, I am not trying to pick on you, seriously, it happened. I am glad you can turn your airbags off, but my child won't be riding in the front of the car until at least 13, probably a few years after that even. Unrestrained children end up dead in accidents, it is a fact of life. I have learned many ways to comfort my child while driving a car, music being the biggest one. Like I said, too many stories from my partner's work, where kids end up dead, and she ends up witnessing the results of these children not being restrained properly.
My mom has participated in the heart breaking search for a dead baby who was ejected. She found the baby. She felt so heartbroken that the baby was alone in the cold for hours while they looked. There was a bad snow storm going on, and the snow covered the baby, while they looked. It took a dog team to find the baby. Thankfully it was very clear that the baby had died from the impact, not due to hypothermia. My mother was changed by that accident, and has become a loud advocate for stricter car seat guidelines because of this.

Just remember that when you have your child unrestrained. I'd rather have my DD unhappy then alone in the cold.

I'm not flaming anyone, just educating on a topic I am very passionate about.
post #28 of 147
I don't get how letting a kid cry in the carseat is in any way the same thing as letting them CIO. You are not doing it to teach them to "self sooth" or whatever... you are doing what is necessary to keep them safe. I will let my kids cry in the carseat over having them die in an accident any day....

Veronica
post #29 of 147
Oh, I don't see how anyone can argue w/ Wendy's post : . I would not take even a 1 millionth of a percent chance of such a thing happening to my babies if it could be prevented by restraining them properly.

I buckle them into their car seats when I drive from Target to Costco, and both stores are in the same parking lot--just too far to walk if it's really windy and cold.

My dd will rear-face until she is probably over four years old (about 35 lbs at the rate she's going) and both kids will sit in a 5-point harness until they are 53 inches tall.

~A proud overprotective American mommy

ETA: This thread inspired me to change my sig!!!
post #30 of 147
I've taken my baby out of her carseat, when she was a NB and the road was empty. I did turn the airbag off. After reading this thread, I doubt I'll do it again.

One thing I will do and feel that the risk/benefit ratio isn't too bad is put the baby up front if she can be buckled in (my car has a seatbelt that doesn't work with her carseat, the truck can do this safely) correctly and the airbag can be turned off. I do this when we're just going to town and the weather is nice. If we're going to the city or the weather is bad, she goes in the back.
post #31 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by DQMama View Post
Oh, I don't see how anyone can argue w/ Wendy's post : . I would not take even a 1 millionth of a percent chance of such a thing happening to my babies if it could be prevented by restraining them properly.

I buckle them into their car seats when I drive from Target to Costco, and both stores are in the same parking lot--just too far to walk if it's really windy and cold.

My dd will rear-face until she is probably over four years old (about 35 lbs at the rate she's going) and both kids will sit in a 5-point harness until they are 53 inches tall.

~A proud overprotective American mommy

ETA: This thread inspired me to change my sig!!!
How do you rear face a child that size? If I rear faced my 3.5 y/o DD who is not more than 32 lbs her legs would be up around her ears.
post #32 of 147
Links on extended rear facing
http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html
http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/StayRearFacing.aspx

Photo link with pictures of children extended rear facing
http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/RFAlbumAll.aspx

My son was rear facing to the limit of his car seat, he was almost 3 and weighed 33 lbs. His legs were bent, but they weren't around his ears, and he was quite comfortable.
post #33 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvercrest79 View Post
How do you rear face a child that size? If I rear faced my 3.5 y/o DD who is not more than 32 lbs her legs would be up around her ears.
Which is perfectly safe and fine. Children are flexible and don't mind.
post #34 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeBeans View Post
Which is perfectly safe and fine. Children are flexible and don't mind.
Maybe your children don't mind...
post #35 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeBeans View Post
Which is perfectly safe and fine. Children are flexible and don't mind.


My dd puts her legs all sorts of places, but is still rearfacing. MUCH safer.

-Angela
post #36 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvercrest79 View Post
Maybe your children don't mind...
It's simply not a choice. Just like being strapped in.

-Angela
post #37 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvercrest79 View Post
How do you rear face a child that size? If I rear faced my 3.5 y/o DD who is not more than 32 lbs her legs would be up around her ears.
The PP gave you some great info, and here is a good youtube video. It shows what happens in a crash w/ a FF and w/ a RF child. It also has tons of pics of "big kids" RF.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2DVfqFhseo

At first I had the same reaction as you. But those pics made me think a child would be more comfy sitting RF than with their legs dangling anyway. And it emphasizes that, even if there had been reports of broken legs from a crash (which there haven't), that would be better than a broken neck, etc.
post #38 of 147
Is having the legs twisted/mangled/smashed safer than what would happen forward facing in a snug 5pt harness (chest clip also) that allows almost no movement?

Travelling in cars/planes/buses/trains just plain scare me.
post #39 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvercrest79 View Post
Is having the legs twisted/mangled/smashed safer than what would happen forward facing in a snug 5pt harness (chest clip also) that allows almost no movement?

Travelling in cars/planes/buses/trains just plain scare me.
Yes. WORST case, RF a leg gets broken. Worst case FF a neck snaps.

Legs are a lot easier to fix.

Rear facing is always safer.

-Angela
post #40 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvercrest79 View Post
Is having the legs twisted/mangled/smashed safer than what would happen forward facing in a snug 5pt harness (chest clip also) that allows almost no movement?
Yes, but I think we posted at the same time so you probably didn't have a chance to watch the video yet.

Also, speaking of Europe, I believe in the Scandanavian countries at least, children rear-face until age 3 or 4.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9916868/page/2/
That link doesn't really clarify it but I have read that somewhere else...maybe someone else knows.

Can you tell this is my current soap box issue? Dh is tired of it
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