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People born by cesarian different than vaginally born people? - Page 3

post #41 of 48
errr...never mind.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
I'm really interested in the question of how a c-section birth could really influence a person.
In all honesty, providing there are no birth injuries, I seriously doubt it affects you at all. Not in the long run. Birth is such a minute fraction of a person's life that to believe the circumstances surrounding it will have a lifelong effect on personality simply defies logic.
post #43 of 48
Thread Starter 
JanetF, I'm interested in references for the gut thing.

Yeah, I thought it sounded too weird to be true, but I just had to ask. Perhaps someone will do a study someday.
post #44 of 48
As someone who's had three natural vaginal births (one at a birth center, two at home-one of which was a UC) I can tell you that my oldest is the MOST PROVOKING 9 YR OLD IN EXISTENCE who was extremely high needs as an infant and has grown into quite the leader, my middle is very sociable, outgoing and loving always laughing and following his brother around, and my youngest is the most chilled out baby I've ever seen in my life.

My take, personality is what makes up the child's personality!
post #45 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by sphinxie View Post
I'm really interested in the question of how a c-section birth could really influence a person. I wish the thread wasn't started with this theory on violence which it seems we nearly all reject As someone born by a c-section, I'd like to know about the possible effects which are relevant. Not that those kinds of things ever apply 100% anyway.
Very intense emotion, such as anger or fear, can be so overwhelming to a newborn that the baby suppresses it. Emotions that are suppressed rather than processed and released (whatever the age of the person) manifest in other ways. they do not just go away because the trauma is forgotten. Just like it's not uncommon for people who are in a bad car accident, say, to forget what happened, but they might still be terrified to get into a car.

There is new evidence that every emotional state has a molecular component that is stored permanently in the body (throughout, not just in the brain). In any experience in which a part of the experience is suppressed, the molecule is fragmented and free-floating through the body. This could cause physical illness and/or emotional disturbance, such as a tendency to recreate traumatic situations in one's life in order to relive and, one hopes, to change/heal. You might do a search for Candace Pert and neuropeptides.

If you think you are suffering from birth trauma, I'll say that I benefited immensely from Rebirthing. It's a breath technique that is supposed to regress the client to the moment of birth, so that the trauma can be released. I did a quick google and none of the links I found made it look very credible, so I'm not sharing them but truly it changed my life.

The reason I wouldn't connect c/s directly with birth trauma is that there are so many ways we make birth traumatic and terrifying for babies, not to mention moms (who have a deep connection with the baby, who picks up mom's emotions). Dh is convinced that dd would have been more traumatized by a longer labor than she was by her c/s birth. Even so, at 2.5 she says she remembers that day and when I asked her if she was sad, she said very slowly and thoughtfully, "Not sad . . . scared."
post #46 of 48
richella, that sounds interesting, and hm, I just had a little lightbulb go off.
post #47 of 48
rubbish

Quote:
It sounds like another birthing is SO much more superior to C section route, only instead of using facts lets make them feel bad
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post #48 of 48
My first son was c-sec and is bipolar and has "issues." But I feel this has less to do with a c-sec and more to do with an unhealthy pregnancy, three days of HIGH doses of pitocin, and birth trauma. As well as some other biological factors I assume but will never ever know. How could I be sure?
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