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The Self-Sufficient Life & A Five Acre Farm - Page 2

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by julielenore View Post
No I haven't, I want to see what I can get away with first
I hear that!
post #22 of 27
we caretake 6 acres and are able to do quite a bit with it. we have a two acre sugar bush where we tap b/t 100 and 200 trees (depending on available time to sugar) and also get some of our firewood from it. we have a milk cow and raise one steer/yr for meat and one pig/yr too. we have two turkeys, ducks, chickens for eggs...

a beekeeper keeps bees on our land.

we have a one acre garden and grow all of our veggies for the year and extra for farmers markets.

we can rotationally graze our milk cow and her calf on the other three acres.

someday we'd like more land but we want to have a larger market farm. we definately can do a lot with 6 acres.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by julielenore View Post
We bought 5.3 acres in the fall, and were very dissapointed when the township told us that our property was zoned "residential" and thet we are not allowed to build a barn or have any farm animals.
not surprising. around here it is becoming more and more common especially if you are in a subdivision with restrictions. Even with 10-20 acres if you fall in a subdivision you often cannot have livestock at all. near here a couple bought 100+ acres for their horse farm. they did all the right things and made sure they could have horses and run their business and one neighbor is fighting them tooth and nail. seems that neighbor prefers a subdivision to a working farm. anyway I just wanted to point out that you should always do your homework before buying land/house. make sure you can do what you want to do with it before you buy. just because someone has 3 horses on the land does not mean you can too (happened to a friend of mine). always check for any deed restrictions, call the town hall etc. I have been seeing odder and odder restrictions. know another woman who can have horses on her property but has to have the manure hauled away at great cost. found out after she built her beautiful barn.
post #24 of 27
This was a large part of the reason we moved to VT. They just don't seem to have _nearly_ as many restrictions about livestock as PA. I couldn't find one blessed place in PA that I could afford that I could own a single chicken!
post #25 of 27
Does anyone have any more book recommendations besides the 2 mentioned? And, believe it or not, all the libraries in our county are closed for lack of funding : so I will have buy any book that we want to read--I need suggestions of really really good ones! We are new to everything also, never gardened (much) or took care of livestock. I would also, of course, like to do everything with organic / sustainable methods.

If we are to stay in this area, we will likely be limited to around 4-5 acres, so this topic is very interesting to me!
post #26 of 27
Carla Emery's Encylopedia of Country Living.
post #27 of 27
check out www.paperbackswap.com for free books too...thus far it has seemed like a pretty good resource.
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