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weird things you have heard as homeschoolers - Page 3

post #41 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by doriansmummy View Post
"Why?" with this face >
post #42 of 139
"How is he going to be able to get a job? He won't be used to being on a schedule and doing what's expected of him."
He's 5.
post #43 of 139
My MIL told me once that my kids wouldn't learn how to "wait in line" without going to school!

Ugg! Like there aren't lines in the real world! I wish!!!



~Peace & Love, Dayna
www.UnschoolingAmerica.com
post #44 of 139
Last time I visited my homeschooling group, a gentleman who was at the park with his grandson (a baby) was asking some "routine" questions of a couple of moms. Of course the "So, what are their college plans?" question came up--followed quickly by a snarky, "Or, can they even do college after being hs'd?"
Turns out, two of the parents had teens. One of the moms chimed in and replied, "My 16 year old daughter is taking 2 college courses right now..." (Almost all of the folks in my group unschool. The majority of our kids are very bright (precocious), and have aspirations in many directions. All of us, as parents, are college grads--only a couple of which hold any sort of job outside the home...)

Anyway, the college and testing comments really make me laugh...I was public schooled. I rememeber my "college prep" and "AP" classes. Yeah, my kids won't be missing out on a thing!
post #45 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolingAmerica View Post
My MIL told me once that my kids wouldn't learn how to "wait in line" without going to school!

Ugg! Like there aren't lines in the real world! I wish!!!



~Peace & Love, Dayna

Yeah, I have heard this one with regards to taking turns. Believe me, honey, it ain't any easier teaching them to take turns in public school!
post #46 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by majikfaerie View Post
if anyone asks me if i will have my DD tested, I say, 'no, but I'm pretty sure she's a real girl'
That's hilarious!

We plan on homeschooling, and when a school-teacher aquaintance of ours heard this, she snottily said, "Why don't you leave that to the professionals." :
post #47 of 139
Mostly we get postitive feedback, although lots of questions about 'socialization' . Some of the more frustrating comments:
"Oh they don't really do anything in kindergarten anyway"
"Oh so-and-so's class hatched chicks, how can he miss out on that?"
"I couldn't spend all day with my kids"
And my all-time favourite: "I want my kids exposed to people from other cultures." This from a friend who's kids live in an upper middle class, primarily caucasian neighborhood. (Not to mention the passive racism and classism I hear in comments like that.) Ds goes to Chinatown, has a friend who's grandfather does work in Malawi, and has a Buddhist grandmother, not to mention all the people we meet in our city on a daily basis. Respect and interest in other people and places just doesn't seem to be fostered in school. It seems that at a young age kids are colour-blind, then as they get older cliques form, and the divisions start. I may be rambling . . . just thinking as I type.
post #48 of 139
Quote:
Recently ds15 was asked, "What grade are you in?" and he replied, "Well, if I was in school, I think I would be finishing up 9th grade, but my educational level is mostly way above that". Her response to that was, "I don't want to know how smart you are, but what grade you are in." then she looked at me, "Are you educating him with a goal for college, and how do you ensure he can get into college?” I reply with, "Well if he so chooses to go to college we have lots of options open, and of course we'll help him if he needs it, but if he chooses not to go to college, that's fine as well, as long as he's able to provide for himself and is happy, that's more important to us". "So, you wouldn't mind it if he was just a well educated garbage collector?" "No, I wouldn't mind, as long as that was his choice and he was happy with that choice". “So you wouldn’t mind if he didn’t go to college?” “No, I wouldn’t mind, as long as it was his choice and he was able to provide for himself and he was happy.”
Wow and you calmly answered this person. I would have been wanting to kick some butt. I would have been steaming
post #49 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by StellasMommy View Post
I just remembered another. On my main "mommy message board", there are only one or two others planning to homeschool. There was a big discussion about it a while back. One remark was "if you're sick, you call a doctor...if a pipe breaks, you call a plumber...you need to send kids to school so they can be taught by professionals."
That's really funny.

Many teachers, especially just starting out, have little more than a B.A. in education, mind you, not even a content area. Sorry, but teaching is hardly rocket science.

Oh, and my DH stays home to teach. Me? I'm a full-time high school teacher.
post #50 of 139
Well, time to add my two cents! I just so happen to be a homeschool graduate and quess what...you might want to sit down for this one..I'm perfectly comfortable in social situations of any kind, I actually went to two proms and 1 homecoming for public school (I guess I socialized alot with boys!) and I went to college and I consider myself to be particularly normal. Obviously, I received no hassle from my mother when we chose to homeschool our little ones but the in-laws were another story and all of the comments above have been said to me more than once...I sometimes interupt with a"I was homeschooled and turned out just fine.." and only the really rude keep it going. My father-in-law, on account of one of his relatives hassling me for homeschooling and the socialization issue (which really didn't bug me at all) actually defended homeschooling and no longer talks to the relative! I, with my cunning sense of humour, just turned around and every time I got the chance I would make that famous look you have all seen with those comments regarding homeschooling and said with all-seriousness and some pity,"You must have went to public school." At first she was taken aback and then I hassled her all night about public school and every time she suggested we get our families together I looked at her with seriousness and asked if it was to socialize my kids with her son...might I add he has serious socialization problems and attends a public school. I think she was shocked to see that out of all the nieces and nephew my children played along with the others and interacted better than the public school kids. The others were just really shy and a mother of another boy said to me "You know my kids are going to be shy no matter where they are. It's just who they are." She continued to rip public schools for about 20 min. I quess it's all in the attitude of how you handle those simple-minded comments. Maybe, next time someone disses (My sense of humour here!) homeschooling just get a pity look on your face and say oh you must have went to public school! Anyway here are some of the dumb comments I have heard;

What about school pictures...that's the best part of school. (Boy, did I miss out big! Hello have you not heard of a portrait studio?)

I hate to tell you the reason mom's send their kids to school is to clean their houses. (Okay my house did look "lived" in, but wasn't the reason for school an education?)

You should get some teacher's books so you know what to teach them. (Thanks..somehwere along the line I must have gotten "Stupid" tattooed across my forehead....I did bring out a teacher book and say like this one?)

A neighbour at 9 am on a morning walk, to my kids,"Do you guys like homeschooling? You're so lucky you can stay in your pajama's all day!" (My kids were fully clothed in real clothes at 9 am ....what an idiot!)

How do you know what to teach them? (Okay possibly legit and I do explain nicely about state standards and blah blah, but again is "stupid" tattoed on my forehead?)

You should do ***** fill in the blank****art, science, or someother project** for school. (Most have been ones we ALREADY did and thanks I have no plan as to what to teach my kids.)

How are you going to get them tested? ( Most of the times I am asked this I do respond nicely about testing...but some of the time I will tell them very nicely we don't have to test them in this state and yes isn't it ridiculous..I quess the public schools are embarrassed by homeschooler's scores!)

We just had a baby and this has brought on an onslaught of new queries....

How do you homeschool with a new baby? Well, quite simply we get up, get ready, and instead of hauling four little ones under the age of 6 out in the snowstorm (We live up north!) we cuddle on the couch to breastfeed (sometimes looks of horror that I wip my boob out in front of the kids!) the baby and do schoolwork and read together.

Don't you want to send your kids to school so you can take a nap with the baby? (I quess I hadn't thought of school as a babysitter....a nap would be nice though....)

It's nice to have them with you when their young, but aren't you gonna get tired of them? (Their my kids not a toy!!)


Okay and last but not least 'cause I need to go and "socialize" my kids,

Every week at Ballet the mom's sit and COMPLAIN about public school and their kids are ALWAYS ill-behaved and after several months of this I couldn't take it anymore when this mother was complaining of her son's teacher for the millionth time I said, "Why don't you just homeschool him?" She stopped and looked at me like it never crossed her mind and another mom chimed in "Homeschooling isn't the answer for everything." I quess public school is. Another mom did end up deciding to homeschool after this conversation.

Oh by the way, I actually went to college to become an Early Ed Teacher...ironic isn't it.
post #51 of 139
Thought I might add my neighbours are public school teachers and constantly compliment my kids vocabulary skills and how well they socialize with their kids and how well-behaved they are.
post #52 of 139
As an "unsocialized (former) homeschooler", I, too, did a lot of socializing with boys. I went to several (public school) dances. Most of the weird comments about hsing have come from my MIL. She has said a few times that all homeschoolers turn out weird. I think that's actually a back-handed slap to me, though. She was always asking if we were planning on putting Ani in public school yet. She's stopped now. The really weirdest thing she's said was in regards to my son (and because of it I think she may be warming up to the homeschooling thing). He cannot read and he is 5 1/2. Until the last few weeks he had no interest in learning to read. No big deal. My MIL said "But won't he be behind." I said since we homeschool it doesn't matter because there's no one to be behind. Her response was "I mean behind the other homeschoolers. All homeschoolers seem to be ahead!"
post #53 of 139
I've gotten a lot of the "how do you know what he knows if you don't test him?" and "how will he get along with other kids if he isn't socialized?" Probably the wierdest, or at least the most offensive, was when a neighbour congratulated me on homeschooling, but then went on to say that she could never homeschool because " I want my child to go to college and get a good job." :

And I hear a lot of comments about "how will he meet people of different races and beliefs?" The funniest thing for me is this is invariably from people who live in the suburbs, who's kids go to almost completely whilte, middle class schools. We live in a neighbourhood that is 50% native, ds's best friend is half african, we have neighbours from Nigeria, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Trinidad, England, a lady just moved in who just moved down from Nunavut, ds used to work at the local grocery store run by muslims from Jordan, we shop at the Korean, Thai, Filipino, Central American grocery stores, the halal shop down the street run by Muslims from Tanzania. Ds's friends are Native, Portuguese, Bosnian, Filipino, Indian. I guess, though, I should take him out of this diverse environment so he could go to one of the local, mostly segregated into races based on income, schools, where he could go to a class to learn about "diversity" from a powerpoint slide show and a speaker

Speaking of public school and diversity, I noticed this on a list I'm on. http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/04/23/turner.prom/index.html

I can see now that ds is missing out on so much exposure to the diversity of human life by being hsed.
post #54 of 139
Quote:
And I hear a lot of comments about "how will he meet people of different races and beliefs?" The funniest thing for me is this is invariably from people who live in the suburbs, who's kids go to almost completely whilte, middle class schools.
LOL... That one really gets to me too. I ask something along the lines of "just how is attending school with people that live in your neighborhood more diverse than being involved with a homeschool group with members from all over this part of the state." The answer gets me even more "but they they are only attending things with other homeschoolers" My reaction to that just leaves them confused "Are you saying that in the PS your child attends class with kids other than those in PS?"
post #55 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolingAmerica View Post
My MIL told me once that my kids wouldn't learn how to "wait in line" without going to school!

Ugg! Like there aren't lines in the real world! I wish!!!



~Peace & Love, Dayna
www.UnschoolingAmerica.com
We go to Disney World, they figured it out .
post #56 of 139
I'm really in for it! My dd is not quite 5 so not too many comments have come yet.

People do look at me awfully weird when they ask which preschool she goes to and I tell them she doesn't. Its almost like they think I am neglectful.
post #57 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by alima View Post
Speaking of public school and diversity, I noticed this on a list I'm on. http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/04/23/turner.prom/index.html

I can see now that ds is missing out on so much exposure to the diversity of human life by being hsed.
I know this is OT, but how is that even possible?

So glad I live in New England.
post #58 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by alima View Post
I've gotten a lot of the "how do you know what he knows if you don't test him?" and "how will he get along with other kids if he isn't socialized?" Probably the wierdest, or at least the most offensive, was when a neighbour congratulated me on homeschooling, but then went on to say that she could never homeschool because " I want my child to go to college and get a good job." :
The snarky voice in my head would have responded with a pittying look and something like "Oh you don't think you're smart enough to help him do that?"
: Though I try to keep that voice muzzled most of the time.
post #59 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColwynsMommy View Post
I know this is OT, but how is that even possible?

So glad I live in New England.
Racism is not limited to the American South. In fact, here you have young people working to overcome it.

Here's an Anti-Defamation League article on Klan activity in New England:

http://www.adl.org/learn/Ext_US/CT/default.asp
post #60 of 139
My dc are so confused when people ask, "Does your mom let you have recess?" or "Does your mom give you homework?"

At a recent field trip the very kind but uninformed vet asked, "How many of you do you have to have in order to do this legally?" (There were only 3 children from 2 families, I guess that's not *enough.*)
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