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another language

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
What's your fave program or technique for teaching dc another language?

I speak German but I haven't really taught my dc because my dh does not speak it and well it's just easier to speak english. English is my most fluent language so that's why I default to it.

So I'm looking into programs to use to help me teach my boys German.

What do you like?
post #2 of 15
Thread Starter 
Man, no one uses anything to teach foreign language?

Muzzy, Rosetta Stone, etc?
post #3 of 15
I can't wait for some responses. My Dd is currently in a dual language immersion program at her public school and she is doing SO WELL with her spanish. She speaks like a native. No accent AT ALL. I think being in the environment 5 days a week with native speakers allows her to absorb the language.

BUT, we've decided to home school next year, and the biggest downfall I see is that she won't have this amazing language opportunity. She's not fluent yet but she has an extensive vocab. and given another couple years I bet she'd become fluent.

Soooo..I've also been wondering just how we can continue the spanish learning at home. I know it won't be nearly as effective as the program she's in now, but still.

I've struggled so much with keeping her in school for the language immersion program and the the drawbacks of public school vs homeschooling. Homeschooling won.
post #4 of 15
I recently did a search here for what people thought of some of the language programs- I haven't used them, but this is what I felt was the summary-

Muzzy is popular with very young children, but older children tend to not be impressed with the 20 year old animation and program. You really need to speak the language with your child to reinforce it.

Rosetta Stone has a good homeschool program for older children that involves computer games. Some moms said they were able to get it through their local libraries. Its pretty pricey, but got rave reviews and sounds like you could do it with any child able to use a computer.

I don't know anything about German. I just got for dd "La Clase Divertida" level 1, we haven't really started it yet for me to give a full review. But I'm happy with the content, and the price was much less than some of the other programs- www.funclase.com

If you do a search here for any program you are considering, you most likely will find a thread where it was discussed some.

HTH,
post #5 of 15
We are using Rosetta Stone for German and then I will be teaching the same words and phrases in ASL at the same time.

AM
post #6 of 15
What age have people started with Rosetta Stone? Right now my oldest isn't quite 6 and we are using Sonrisas Spanish School for an introduction for all three boys. But, soon I'd like to look into purchasing Rosetta Stone (like in the next year or so). Does it, though, assume the child can already read in their native language? Or is it all listening/clicking the mouse? I

I do like the Sonrisas for little kids ... it's based on music, picture books, art projects, movement/dancing. We are using the songs for circle time, will incorporate the art activities during our regular art/craft time, and are checking out the spanish picture books from the library.
post #7 of 15
We have used before you know it and bbc. I'm too cheap to buy rosetta stone or muzzy, anyways my son changes the language he wants to learn every few months, so I hestitate to make a big investment.
post #8 of 15
My children attend Saturday afternoon Greek School for four hours (think: My Big Fat Greek Wedding). My background is Greek, I speak it but my husband doesn't so speaking it at home just doesn't come naturally. We also have Rosetta Stone Greek, and I find it to be an excellent program, and we use it sporadically as a supplement.
Where I live there are ethnic language programs offered in various community/church settings. A friend of mine has her children in the Saturday Spanish program through the Spanish community. She is not Spanish, and that hasn't been a problem. I have heard that there is a similar German program offered somewhere in the city.
Other than Rosetta Stone, I do not have any experience with other computer language programs, but I can say I do like Rosetta Stone a lot. Try checking out some language programs through the community like the ones mentioned above.
We love our Saturday Greek School. The kids have made some great friends, they get the 'schooly' experience, they sit in a desk, have a backpack and lunch kit, are learning lots of Greek, and dh and I get a 4 hour date! My only kid free time all week.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by frogguruami View Post
We are using Rosetta Stone for German and then I will be teaching the same words and phrases in ASL at the same time.

AM
I'm going to come live with you AM, you are doing so many things that I'm interested in doing with E. I'm emailing you now!!!!!
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by momtokea View Post
My children attend Saturday afternoon Greek School for four hours (think: My Big Fat Greek Wedding). My background is Greek, I speak it but my husband doesn't so speaking it at home just doesn't come naturally. We also have Rosetta Stone Greek, and I find it to be an excellent program, and we use it sporadically as a supplement.
Where I live there are ethnic language programs offered in various community/church settings. A friend of mine has her children in the Saturday Spanish program through the Spanish community. She is not Spanish, and that hasn't been a problem. I have heard that there is a similar German program offered somewhere in the city.
Other than Rosetta Stone, I do not have any experience with other computer language programs, but I can say I do like Rosetta Stone a lot. Try checking out some language programs through the community like the ones mentioned above.
We love our Saturday Greek School. The kids have made some great friends, they get the 'schooly' experience, they sit in a desk, have a backpack and lunch kit, are learning lots of Greek, and dh and I get a 4 hour date! My only kid free time all week.

That sounds so cool. Unfortunately there is nothing like that in my area. I could, however, drive 4 hours to Miami. they have a German school there.
post #11 of 15
Birthjunkie,

I notice that you are in IL. One idea for your dd who has been in immersion classes is an immersion class that doesn't meant in a school. I've been surfing the web looking for programs like this because like you I like language immersion programs because they are SO much better than book learning or even computer programs. But, I also want to homeschool.

There is Language Stars in IL (I know in the Chicago area but may be other places). It's a center based immersion program. You can take classes one to two days a week and it is play based lessons in the language you choose: Spanish, French, Italian, and some others.

Just a suggestion. Another idea is to find an adult friend who is a native Spanish speaker and set up some times for them to spend time with your dd. Maybe a set time each week where they talk in the language, read books together, cook together, go out in the community together. Maybe her public school teachers know of someone open to this?

Kylix
post #12 of 15
My dh doesn't speak the language I speak to my kids either, which makes it very easy to fall back into speaking to them in English. But I try my hardest to speak to them at least mostly in the target language. As for programs, I love Rosetta Stone. My two and three year olds sit next to me for small periods of time and try and tell me the correct answer. Pimsleur is also good, it is GREAT for pronunciation because it breaks down the word so you can hear even those swallowed sounds. Dvds are essential if you don't have other speakers of the language around. Music is another good one. Books in the target language, amazon.de is just like the English one. Shipping is OUTRAGEOUS though, I once bought two dvds that I paid under ten euro for that I then had to pay over twenty euro in shipping. Crazy but worth it if you aren't going to visit anytime soon/don't want to bother friends/relatives in Germany all the time.

Create an immersion school at home. If you don't want to speak in German all the time, make certain activities German ones. For example, the zoo or the bath or mealtime, etc.
post #13 of 15
My DD and the little girl I watch pick up some Spanish from TV (Dora, Diego), and I reinforce it with things like playing candyland with them in Spanish (the rules came in Spanish as well as English which provided me with a refresher on relevant vocabulary), and I respond as quickly when one of them shouts "ayudame!" from the backyard as "help me!"

I like the look of that Sonrisas curriculum, though. How fluent in the language do you have to be to implement it? I had it in college through 4 semesters' worth, but I'm rusty and get really nervous trying to speak to native speakers (such as the maid who works for the family I nanny for, or the little girl I watch's dad who is totally fluent in English, or his teenaged kids who speak a wierd mix of Spanish and English to each other and their dad).
post #14 of 15
Since you are fluent in German I'd create a mini-immersion and just start speaking German to your kids for certain things. I know some families with kids who are fluent in English plus a second language because one parent or a live-in grandparent speaks that language only to the kid and the other parent speaks English to them.
post #15 of 15
I love Pimsleur, but interaction with children who speak other languages is more important.
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