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Egg yolks for babies???

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Ok, I see alot of you feed your babies meats and egg yolks. I may have not gotten a piece of integral info about TFs, but shouldn't eggs be avoided for the first year at least b/c they are a common allergen? I have been giving my bf ds mostly just pureed organic vegetables and fruits. He is 6 mo. and cutting his first 2 teeth simultaneously. Should I be giving him meats? Do these egg yolks need to be pastured (I may not be able to find fresh eggs from pastured chickens here) ?
post #2 of 25
I have read it's only the egg whites that are a common allergen.
post #3 of 25
Ya, I've always heard it's the egg whites that are a concern. I've read lot's of places, mainstream and otherwise that recomend egg yolk for babies.
post #4 of 25
If he doesn't show any signs of food allergies it's probably okay to give egg yolks before a year. It's impossible to get all of the egg white off of the yolk, though, so just because a baby's only getting the yolk doesn't mean they have no chance of becoming allergic to eggs.
post #5 of 25
I don't think it's worth the risk- caedmyn is right, you can't completely separate the two, and in running multiple yahoo groups about children and TF, eggs seem to be a very common allergen in those who started the yolk at 4-6 months.
post #6 of 25
I just gave DD a yolk yesterday. There's a great farm up the street with the freshest egg and I decided to give it a whirl. It did take a bit of effort to get all the white off, but we just ate of the middle and it was fine. She didn't finish it and promptly spit it all up, but that is more of an issue with everything she eatso f ther then breastmilk.
post #7 of 25
Mine didnt' eat anything at 6 months, pretty much nothing untill closer to 9 or 10 months so I didn't really think about it
post #8 of 25
Maybe I'm missing something but everytime I've boiled an egg for dd I just pull all the yolk off, are you saying that some stays on there even if you can't see it??

Also, how much of allergies are genetic?? If we don't have any at all, how much would we have to worry about dd??
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasshell View Post
I just gave DD a yolk yesterday. There's a great farm up the street with the freshest egg and I decided to give it a whirl. It did take a bit of effort to get all the white off, but we just ate of the middle and it was fine. She didn't finish it and promptly spit it all up, but that is more of an issue with everything she eatso f ther then breastmilk.
If she's spitting up everything she eats besides BM, I'd highly recommend stopping all solids for a while as that's a sign that her body isn't ready for them.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomlynn View Post
Maybe I'm missing something but everytime I've boiled an egg for dd I just pull all the yolk off, are you saying that some stays on there even if you can't see it??

Also, how much of allergies are genetic?? If we don't have any at all, how much would we have to worry about dd??
Yes, some of the protein from the egg white is likely still there.

IMO a child is more likely to have allergies if parents/sibilings do, but it's certainly not cut-and-dried. Allergies are not inherited but I think genetics play some part in susceptibility, as they do in most diseases (ie one family tends to have asthma issues, while another has several members with diabetes)...does that make sense? In other words, the diseases themselves aren't inherited, they're caused by improper diets and/or poor gut flora, but the tendency to develop a particular disease as a result of improper diet/poor gut flora is genetic.

Anyhow, my 16 month old has multiple food allergies and neither DH nor I have any allergies.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by caedmyn View Post
If she's spitting up everything she eats besides BM, I'd highly recommend stopping all solids for a while as that's a sign that her body isn't ready for them.


Thank you! I don't think she's ready-she's fine with just BM IMO, but she has started smacking her lips when we eat. She's 8.5 months old; shouldn't I at least try to give her solids? SO and everyone else in my life is giving me a hard time for not giving her more solids.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomlynn View Post
Also, how much of allergies are genetic?? If we don't have any at all, how much would we have to worry about dd??
Taken from: http://faculty.olin.edu/~jcrisman/Se.../allergies.htm

Who is most likely to develop a food allergy? The ability to become allergic is often inherited, though a child can also develop a non-inherited food allergy. Children with one allergic parent have twice the risk of develop-ing food allergies as children without allergic parents. If both parents are allergic, then the chances are quadrupled for their children (AAIA, 1993). However, a child may have a completely different food allergy than that of the parent. For example, a parent who is allergic to peanuts may have a child who is allergic to milk, but not allergic to peanuts.

End link.

As DH and I have no food allergies (other than me to champagne, of all things!), DD has been exposed to all allergens (except shellfish, and only because we don't eat it hardly ever). We've actually made a concerted effort to give her egg yolks as she's very low (<5%) on the weight scale)...obviously, you give whatever food in small amounts and watch for a reactions, but, she's had everything...wheat, citrus, tomatoes, strawberries, chocolate, eggs, soy, peanuts (!), etc. And the only reaction so far...cinnamon...*shrug*

For PP, as far as solids...

I'm a big advocate of baby led feeding. Whatever you're eating, if it's soft and can be cut into small pieces, put within her reach and see what she does with it...if she's ready for eating solids, she'll eat it...if not, try again in a couple weeks. http://www.borstvoeding.com/voedseli...uidelines.html

Interesting reading...see what you think...
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasshell View Post
I just gave DD a yolk yesterday. There's a great farm up the street with the freshest egg and I decided to give it a whirl. It did take a bit of effort to get all the white off, but we just ate of the middle and it was fine. She didn't finish it and promptly spit it all up, but that is more of an issue with everything she eatso f ther then breastmilk.
She's too young. Wait 3-4 months.

Recommending egg yolks to babies under 1 year is one of the main points (in addition to the bf'ing issue) that I have to strongly disagree w/ Sally Fallon on. Just eat plenty of them yourself and all is well. (I love love love raw egg yolks in smoothies! I'll bring you one if you want.)

And hi! Fancy meeting you here...
post #14 of 25
Ohhhh I'm so confused. I guess I'll stick with breast milk and lots of eggs for me. I bought 4 dozen of those darn things the other day thinking I'd be giving her one a day along with what the rest of us eat. I'm up to my eyeballs in eggs!


Quote:
Originally Posted by nourishing View Post
And hi! Fancy meeting you here...

Yeah, really!
post #15 of 25
Yummmm, 4 dozen! Eggs go pretty quickly around here. We eat them poached and scrambled. I should probably turn into an egg anyday now. They've been a hardcore staple in my life for the past couple years. Yay for poor college students!
post #16 of 25

I use egg yolks too

I have a 10 month old and have been feeding him egg yolks for about two months. About 5 per week. I have a book called Super Baby Food by Ruth Yaron and she recommends egg yolks also. It's an excellent book although it comes from more of a vegetarian view point. I had read this book first before Nourishing Traditions so felt comfortable with the egg yolks since both sources recommended them.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasshell View Post
Thank you! I don't think she's ready-she's fine with just BM IMO, but she has started smacking her lips when we eat. She's 8.5 months old; shouldn't I at least try to give her solids? SO and everyone else in my life is giving me a hard time for not giving her more solids.
If she's reacting by spitting up, definitely wait. IMO it's best to wait as long as possible on solids--I started my DD on solids at about that age, and even though she barely ate everything, she now reacts to every one of her first foods (including eggs and coconut oil). I think she probably wasn't ready even though she had the "signs" of being ready for solids.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by katheek77 View Post
Taken from: http://faculty.olin.edu/~jcrisman/Se.../allergies.htm

Who is most likely to develop a food allergy? The ability to become allergic is often inherited, though a child can also develop a non-inherited food allergy. Children with one allergic parent have twice the risk of develop-ing food allergies as children without allergic parents. If both parents are allergic, then the chances are quadrupled for their children (AAIA, 1993). However, a child may have a completely different food allergy than that of the parent. For example, a parent who is allergic to peanuts may have a child who is allergic to milk, but not allergic to peanuts.
Interesting read, for sure. But it omits the issues surrounding the possibility of leaky gut in the mother resulting in allergies in the baby, even if the mother has no allergy symptoms in herself.... yet.
post #19 of 25
I'd have to agree on waiting. And I wouldn't recommend it to anyone really. I gave my dd eggs at about 6 months and she totally projectiled it a couple hours later. I don't have any symptoms of allergies that I have ever connected, but discovered maybe I have a leaky gut issues.

So unless one is 100 percent certain that they have a great working gut and no allergies in the family and a Nt diet, I wouldn't try. I know there are tons of babies that do fine with it, but I've heard of more that do not.
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishface View Post
Yummmm, 4 dozen! Eggs go pretty quickly around here. We eat them poached and scrambled. I should probably turn into an egg anyday now. They've been a hardcore staple in my life for the past couple years. Yay for poor college students!
What are some of the ways that you cook or prepare eggs? We scramble or boil them. Sometimes eat them as quiche with bacon, cheese and spinach. Any other ideas? We have lots of access to organic, pastured eggs (I have two different suppliers), and would love to utilize them more, but have never been much of an egg person.
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