or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › What causes autism?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What causes autism? - Page 2

post #21 of 86
A friend of mine was absolutely convinced 10 or 11 years ago that vaccination was the ONLY cause of autisim and was what caused her son's autisim. She firmly believed that there was no way he would have been autistic without the vaccines, as he had regressed just after his MMR.

Then she had another child who she of course did not vaccinate and, sadly, that child was diagnosed with autism also. Stikingly her second son "regressed" right around the time he would have had an MMR vaccine, just like her first.

I think she spent a year or two just really thrown by, not just the second diagnosis, but trying to let go of something she had believed in so strongly for three years. It was really hard on her.

Now she is a believer in the "genes" plus environmental trigger theory, though she is open to the idea that for some people there is no real trigger, its just the genes.
post #22 of 86
"But the exponential rate increases have led more and more scientists to suspect that autism might result from an interplay between genetic vulnerability and nongenetic causes, says Harvard pediatric neuroscientist Dr. Martha Herbert. "This new line of investigation calls for a knowledge of toxicology, genetic individuality, and biochemistry much more detailed than most current autism researchers possess."


http://www.motherjones.com/news/feat...03/02_354.html


and..... (from same link)

"Richard Deth, a Northeastern University pharmacologist, has found that even low levels of thimerosal affect a critical neural pathway regulating brain-cell growth. When Deth submitted his study to Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, he said he was rejected on the grounds that it hadn't met standards for "exceptional importance and novelty." Deth was dumbfounded: "I keep hearing from public-health officials that there is no scientific basis to support a connection between thimerosal exposure and autism. Yet here I am bringing it to you and it's not considered important?"
post #23 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post

1 in 150 children in the usa is enough though, isnt it? and that is only going to increase.
Sure, it's a lot. But how many out of every 150 are vaccinated? 100? 125? Maybe more? Why don't the rest of them have the same issues? I'm not saying there's NO relation to vax. I'm saying there's something additional that makes certain people suseptible (sp?) to the ingredients in vaxxes.
post #24 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitsune6 View Post
It really didn't make any difference
splitting up the MMR can make a huge difference for many children. after MMR injections, many children suddenly stop communicating and behave totally different. now i am avoiding these vaxs all together, but i would not say that splitting up the MMR makes no difference. what also makes a difference is when you get them. the immune system of a 2 or 3 year old is a lot stronger than one of a 15 month old for example.
post #25 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by maya44 View Post
A friend of mine was absolutely convinced 10 or 11 years ago that vaccination was the ONLY cause of autisim and was what caused her son's autisim. She firmly believed that there was no way he would have been autistic without the vaccines, as he had regressed just after his MMR.

Then she had another child who she of course did not vaccinate and, sadly, that child was diagnosed with autism also. Stikingly her second son "regressed" right around the time he would have had an MMR vaccine, just like her first.

I think she spent a year or two just really thrown by, not just the second diagnosis, but trying to let go of something she had believed in so strongly for three years. It was really hard on her.

Now she is a believer in the "genes" plus environmental trigger theory, though she is open to the idea that for some people there is no real trigger, its just the genes.
there really are a ton of cases where children were developing normally until the MMR. what happens is the measles virus actually attacks their system.
here is an article:
Measles Vaccine Undeniably Linked to Autism
post #26 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by myjulybabes View Post
Sure, it's a lot. But how many out of every 150 are vaccinated? 100? 125? Maybe more? Why don't the rest of them have the same issues? I'm not saying there's NO relation to vax. I'm saying there's something additional that makes certain people suseptible (sp?) to the ingredients in vaxxes.
i agree, there are often times other things that occur, genetics, baby being exposed to mercury in utero (flu vax, rhogaham, amalgram fillings) and other things im sure.

but what i am learning at the moment with all my research is that there are so many kids who were developing normally and then after receiving say the MMR, suddenly start seizuring and acting strange, stop speaking, etc. and soon after are diagnosed autistic. if youve read stephanie caves book -what your doctor may not tell you about childrens vaccinations, she says almost all of her autistic kids blood tests come back with extremely high metal levels. if you catch this early enough, before the mercury and other metals destroy the brain, you can actually detoxify the body of metals, and many of her autistic children have recovered. they are no longer autistic. its really interesting.
post #27 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post
there really are a ton of cases where children were developing normally until the MMR. what happens is the measles virus actually attacks their system.
here is an article:
Measles Vaccine Undeniably Linked to Autism

Are you suggesting then, then the second unvaccinated Child caught the measles naturally, and it then attacked his system?
post #28 of 86
I just wanted to throw in a couple of ideas from my ds. For him it could be a number of things. I took bp meds during my whole pregnancy with him. I believe it was a class c drug. I was given pitocin to induce(no need to insult me, I have past abuse issues and have trouble dialating without drugs). He was posterior and came out that way. It was a very traumatic birth and he was born blue although he pinked right up. He has serious allergy issues and did regress a bit after adding gluten to his diet. I'm almost sure that his uncle on dh's side is on the spectrum. I'm also pretty sure i'm on the spectrum. In the very least I had trouble with crowds and sensory issues. He had his 2 month vax's and no more. The only differences between him and his brother are his brother in completly unvaxed and had a quicker birth.

He's also had feeding issues and has been different since birth. He never liked to be cuddled(he liked to be held though). He never gave eye contact or would look at my while nursing. He started lining things up and categorizing things before a year old. I never felt bonded to him. The lactation consultant even commented on how attached we were but I didn't feel it with him. He's always felt distant to me.

My ds is considered high functioning. I think he would not be as high functioning if I let his body take the assault from his allergies longer than I did. He did do much better after I removed gluten from his diet.

So what am I trying to get at? I don't know. I do think that most asd people have a genetic predisposition to it. I also think that some people need a immune trigger to develop it. I also think that some people can have it due to neurological impairment. I don't think I will ever know why my ds is on the spectrum nor do I care. My goal in life is to help him live his as easily as possible. That would still be my goal if he wasn't on the spectrum.


Misty
post #29 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post
there really are a ton of cases where children were developing normally until the MMR. what happens is the measles virus actually attacks their system.
Her 2nd child was not vaccinated.
post #30 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post
i dont buy the "its more diagnosed thing nowadays" . i just went to a vaccine seminar by Dr eisenstien and he agreed that that was the most ridiculous thing....he was like you dont miss an autisitic kid....its pretty OBVIOUS when one has autism/or is on the spectrum (by the medical professionals anyway).
Well, I can say that the medical professionals disagree as to whether my kiddo is autistic. Two evaluations, within two months of each other. One concluded mild to moderate autism. The other concluded absolutely not autistic, not even on the spectrum. Both reasonably well-known in the area and recommended by other professionals. Most of the therapists, school evaluators, etc who have worked with DS have seemed surprised to hear that DS has an autism diagnosis. Yet when I take various screening tools, he usually scores as at least a possibility of autism.

I honestly cannot believe that DS would have been labeled autistic twenty years ago. (The kid talks in complete sentences that are completely in context, never rocks, no longer bangs his head, engages in imaginative play, plays with his peers and makes eye contact--and he's not even four yet.)

So, I do think that people are diagnosed now who would not have been in the past. I am not sure if I think that is a good thing.
post #31 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post
i dont buy the "its more diagnosed thing nowadays" . i just went to a vaccine seminar by Dr eisenstien and he agreed that that was the most ridiculous thing....he was like you dont miss an autisitic kid....its pretty OBVIOUS when one has autism/or is on the spectrum (by the medical professionals anyway).
While I don't believe it amounts for the vast increase, there are definitely more cases being diagnosed now than there used to be. And I think many of those are either on the very high end of the spectrum (Asperger's) - people who used to just be considered odd or quirky or genius or whatever and also on the very low end - profoundly autistic who used to be written off as "mentally retarded".

There are so many examples of both of those kinds of "missed" or mis-diagnosis - look at all the adults (even on this board) who are either self diagnosed or werent' dx'd until they were adults. And I've heard many stories of institutionalized people who were considered completely low IQ, who start typing like crazy when given access to facilitated communication tools.

ETA - as for medical professionals not missing an autistic kid - I would say the vast majority of pediatricians in this country cannot recognize an autistic child before the age of 2 UNLESS there are very obvious signs such as hand flapping or spinning.
post #32 of 86
My unvaccinated YoungSon is on the spectrum, and I have reason to be certain he has no gluten/casien issues (9 months clear liquid diet made no change in symptoms). Genetically, my side of the family has no history, except for extreme learning disabilities and some folks with sensory quirks. No paternal family history is available, as his Dad was adopted, but Dad had no symptoms. Yes, I have some amalgam fillings, but I had them for my other pregnancies also. Let's see, no flu vax, no rhogam, what else has been proposed? I have ruled out everything I have ever heard suggested. I have read pretty extensively, and never found any explanation that fits for us, other than "human variation". That makes sense to me, and in some cases, I can see that perhaps diet or vaccinations, or other environmental factors could contribute.

Maybe it is because I love YoungSon so much just exactly how he is, but I totally agree with Individuation that research money would be best directed to services that enable autistics and their families to live happily, rather than trying to fix or even prevent autism.
post #33 of 86
*
post #34 of 86
sorta OT - Oh thanks for posting that Finch. I'd forgotten the author of that article. That was published at a very intense time for me and my family and I have to say, it was really life changing.
post #35 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post
splitting up the MMR can make a huge difference for many children. after MMR injections, many children suddenly stop communicating and behave totally different. now i am avoiding these vaxs all together, but i would not say that splitting up the MMR makes no difference. what also makes a difference is when you get them. the immune system of a 2 or 3 year old is a lot stronger than one of a 15 month old for example.
I quess I should of said it didn't make any difference for us. As a rule my DR. didn't do MMR until 2yrs old. I chose to break it up after his 2yr check up and she supported me. It didn't make my son's symptoms magically go away. That's all I'm saying.
post #36 of 86
Wowsa Finch. Powerful article. Thank you so much for sharing it. I'm not a crier, but that one's got me tearing up.
post #37 of 86
I believe when we talk about 'autism', we actually are talking about more than one condition. Probably quite a few, that have some similarities in manifestation but differ in origin.
I also believe this is not a coincident, that more and more conditions are being added to the 'spectrum', indeed widening the definitions.
I do believe that many of the causes of these different conditions are iatrogenic. Including gene mutations of parents. Not necessarily all of them though. And this is exactly why the definitions are widening and 'no single cause' is conclusively found.
I do believe that the issue is becoming political way too quickly and it is not going to end up well. Neither for those who would like to see more help for autistic people nor for those who would like to find cause/cure/prevention.

In a nutshell - it's a mess :
post #38 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaye View Post
sorta OT - Oh thanks for posting that Finch. I'd forgotten the author of that article. That was published at a very intense time for me and my family and I have to say, it was really life changing.
Damn y'all are fast readers......I yanked that post so as not to cause a stir. Not everyone here feels the way I do, I don't want to hurt any feelings or make anyone feel less than welcome.

But yes, I love that article. Here's what they're talking about, if anyone cares to read it. Again, I am not trying to hurt feelings here. I think this is an excellent viewpoint:

http://www.cammiemcgovern.com/articles_nytimes.html
post #39 of 86
To be honest, I don't think it's clear what autism *is*, let alone what causes it.

I mean, lists have been made of things that autistics supposedly do or don't do, and explanations are given as to why. As I read more firsthand accounts from autistic adults, I usually find that most of the more official "reasons" for certain behaviors or traits don't match up and the descriptions from the autistics themselves make a lot more sense.

I think we supposedly ruled out PDD's a year or two ago with my Aspie kid. Doctors miss him all the time. Our pediatrician has had loads of office visits with my son before his bowel issues and others were farmed out to various specialists, and while she knew he was atypical from my ongoing descriptions and the various diagnoses he accumulated, she didn't "see" autistic qualities in him. I think the only in-office behavior that actually surprised and concerned her was when he bit me once (at 5 y.o.), and that was actually more of a tourettic compulsion than a typical autistic behavior.

Sherri
post #40 of 86
OP= just curious as to your interest in this?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Special Needs Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Special Needs Parenting › What causes autism?