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Did breastfeeding come easily to you and your baby? - Page 6

Poll Results: Did nursing come easily to you and your baby?

 
  • 49% (312)
    Yes
  • 40% (253)
    No
  • 10% (66)
    Other
631 Total Votes  
post #101 of 195
i voted "other," since i have 2 girls.

dd1 was a piece of cake. latched right on, just a hint of soreness the first week or so, until the "?keratinization" finished. (that's not to say going on a total elimination diet for food allergies at 6mos was easy...). gave me that confidence good nursers give you.

dd2 was a surprise: fast (UC, she was so fast), uncomplicated homebirth, but a baby with a bit of a tongue tie, and who seemed to think she should tuck her head, retract her tongue, purse her lips, stuff the first 2 fingers of each hand into her mouth, too... i was sore the second day, heard clicking, and called my LLL leader. throw in a bit of reflux (arching and pulling off, after i just finished getting her latched well, repeat every minute or so throughout session), and it was very good i had my confidence and support network in place. CST and "tongue exercises" helped a lot, but her latch has always been uncomfortable. if she had been my first, when i had no past success or support network, it could have been a very short nursing relationship.
post #102 of 195
I voted other - very different experiences with each child.

1) My first child was an emergency c-section, so we had a bit of a laggy start. My milk took about 3 days to come in, and because she was a "big baby" at 8lbs 6oz, the nurses urged me to give her some formula. She had one ounce. I was stressed out, tired (hadn't slept at all during my 44 hour labour and only had a couple of hours of sleep during my 3 day hospital stay after the birth), and couldn't handle the crying anymore. After the ounce of formula, it would have been so easy to just continue. But I stuck it out. I had nurses hovering around me, one with the baby's head in hand, one with my breast in hand, and one coaching us on, in order to get breastfeeding to "work." The whole thing was just silly, in retrospect.

I had severe pain for 2 weeks afterwards, because she just would not stop nursing. She would nurse 24 hours a day, simply for comfort. So we started using a pacifier to give my nipples a break, and some time to heal. Within a week, things were perfect.

She nursed until she was nearly 2 years old.

2) My son was born after a VBAC, at 8lbs 7oz. He latched on minutes after the birth, and nursing went absolutely flawlessly. There have been zero issues. He turns two in another couple of weeks, and is still showing no signs of wanting to wean. I attribute the success in part to the vaginal birth (no delayed milk), and in part because I was a "pro" by that point and was very relaxed about the whole thing.
post #103 of 195
DS#1... No it was pretty hard at first.

DS#2... Very easy!!!
post #104 of 195
I put other because I had external problems with both my girls. My first, I just didn't know much and gave her bottles and pacis and ruined her latch (I only nursed her for a couple weeks, and never exclusively at all). But I'm confident that if I had been educated we would've been fine. My second was in the NICU for two weeks and I had to EP for her till she was 11 days old, but after that, we had no problems.
post #105 of 195
NO. It was the hardest thing I've ever done, actually. We endured every problem in the book, except mastitis. Everyone told me to give up. I refused. I decided that even if it never got better, even if the pain never stopped, that I would nurse DS for at least his first year--for HIM. Thankfully, all the problems were solved and all the pain went away somewhere between 3 & 4 months, and after that it was easy & wonderful. But those first months...oy! I'm hoping it comes easier with the new baby.
post #106 of 195
DD didnt' take to bfing at all...I ended up pumping for her most of the time, but did nurse at the breast sometimes...

DS has taken too it great, if I pump (which I have tried) he usually won't take it he hates the bottle with a passion.
post #107 of 195
No, it didn't come easy, or at all. DD had no rooting or sucking reflex at birth. She refused to latch. By the time she had the reflexes, she was hooked on the syringe. I exclusively pumped for 18 months for her. (thats when my great supply disappeared from being pregnant) She will have plenty of frozen EBM until she reaches 24 months old, when I deliver another baby and can pump for her again.

I also went through mastitis multiple times, thrush, cracked, bloody, blistered nipples. I had severe pain for the entire 18 months of pumping. I have not pumped in almost a month now, and I am still not healed.
post #108 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JessBB View Post
.... It hurts a bit to know that there are moms who think I am "weird" or that there is something more I could have done to prevent issues....
I hope this isn't in response to my post - I certainly wasn't trying to criticise or make anyone feel bad - there are just so many mammas out there that *do* have a tough time bf'ing, & I think the poster after me who pointed out the unnatural obstacles that people have to overcome in today's society (not unlike the problems w/birth - I was educated, & my birth certainly wasn't the one I expected...) was getting to the root cause. Which is something our society needs to address, in order to increase breastfeeding rates.
post #109 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JessBB View Post
For the record, I had an unmedicated birth at a birth center attended by midwives. Baby latched (or tried to) pretty much immediately. I had to work my a$$ off to keep nursing. I was really educated on bf'ing and had every expectation of EBF but I still had to supplement for 12 days (not that I was counting ). It hurts a bit to know that there are moms who think I am "weird" or that there is something more I could have done to prevent issues. Mine were completely the result of poor anatomy, bad advice and bad luck. B/C I went through so much I am both more judgmental of moms who FF w/out even trying and more compassionate when I stop to think that I really have no idea what their story might be. And to all the c-sec and medicated birth moms out there, please don't beat yourself up - I had dream labor and delivery and clearly nursing has been anything but!
Me, too. A wonderful birth center birth--no meds, no hosptial, no c/s, no doctors, nothing to interfere with nursing, no separation from baby, no one around me who wasn't supportive of bfing, no husband or ped pushing formula (quite the opposite), a doula who is a LLL leader, plus the best LCs in my area. It was brutally awful for months despite all that and is still not "normal."

And I know EXACTLY what you mean about being both more judgmental and more compassionate.
post #110 of 195
I had problems with both of my boys, if not for the wonderful LC at my peds office I don't know what would have happened (though formula was never mentioned and it never crossed my mind).

DS#1 - born in a hospital with all the normal interventions - was tongue tied, he was latching properly, there wasn't any extreme pain, just normal nipple soreness. However, he was still losing weight at 10days when they realized he was tongue tied. They clipped it and it went perfectly from there.

DS#2 - born at a freestanding birth center though he was deep suctioned at birth. : We had all kinds of short term problems that lasted a day, got fixed, then something else went wrong. His major issue was he had oral aversion due to deep suctioning. He was traumatized. We worked through it and it got a lot better from there.

With both of my boys it took 2 weeks for things to be going smoothly. Thankfully I have a crap load of milk and was able to easily pump plenty, so formula was never mentioned by anyone.
post #111 of 195
1st time? NOPE
2nd time? Nope - better it eneded up going REALLYwell!!
3rd time? YES!!
post #112 of 195
I had a terrible time. We didn't get the right help, because I assumed that if a nurse was offering to help us then she actually knew what the she was doing, and the right help didn't arrive until we were hours from discharge with a baby who couldn't latch, and by then there was only so much we could do.

We ended up going home with a nipple shield. It was eight weeks before DD was able to nurse unassisted. It was only with the support of an IBCLC that we were able to wean her off the shield. It was really, really hard.
post #113 of 195
No. I did not give bottles for 12 hours, tried to feed her from birth, and she refused to latch on. I consulted a LC recommended by LLL within 48 hours, another LC later on, and one of my best friends is a LLL leader. You would think with all that help I would have eventually nursed, but it just never happened. I am still very sad when I think about it. I pumped for 5.5 months.

With dd2 I did not want to bf initially b/c of some PPD and still burned after trying to nurse the first time around. I still had flat nippes (sometimes inverted). I pumped for awhile until I got the courage to try nursing. She nursed like twice but she had major GI problems and ended up on a feeding tube because she didn't eat enough by bottle either and was very sick.
post #114 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by rupiezum View Post
I had a terrible time. We didn't get the right help, because I assumed that if a nurse was offering to help us then she actually knew what the she was doing, and the right help didn't arrive until we were hours from discharge with a baby who couldn't latch, and by then there was only so much we could do.

We ended up going home with a nipple shield. It was eight weeks before DD was able to nurse unassisted. It was only with the support of an IBCLC that we were able to wean her off the shield. It was really, really hard.
:
Nursing was hell for us. I wanted a UC birth. I got a vacuum/forceps/c-section birth. He was vigorously suctioned, had breathing problems and I didn't see him for 4 hours. I was overloaded from IV fluids and my milk didn't come in until 10 days pp. They gave me a nipple shield in the hospital because he wouldn't latch for 24 hrs. The nipple shield was too big for me, I developed thrush which they wouldn't treat me for until it was too late, plus cracked and bleeding nipples. My son had severe reflux, dairy allergy, colic, and would sleep for 8 hours at a time due to the pain meds they gave me from the c-section. I did finally get a bad, painful latch but I wouldn't let down for my baby even with the help of an LC he only got 1/3 oz. after 30 minutes of nursing. I still don't have the answers, but my ds never "drank" at the breast, and was never satisfied even after nursing for an hour. I tried EP'ing, but my milk dried up (the most I ever pumped was 2 oz at a time). I tried domperidone but I was allergic to it. It was a nursing failure for us. I REALLY hope I can nurse the next baby.
post #115 of 195
It's been many a year since I nursed and maybe time has erased the bad and only left the good. I do remember some soreness and blocked ducts and
mastitis but it's fuzzy

What I do remember fondly is dd was a pro right from get go. Even when teeth came in, she learned quickly if she bit, she was pulled off, away from food. She nursed until she was 18 months- 20 months maybe- lost baby book and I can't remember exactly.... And yeah, she'd have nursed longer if I'd known what I know now. I let her self-wean too early

Ds was a little more difficult but not in the sense most babies are. He would latch on no problem but hated being held. It made for a conflicted baby to say the least! He made it to 13 months. That was all either of us could tolerate.

So, yes breastfeeding came easily in most ways but not perfectly.
post #116 of 195
yep, it sure did. it was the ONLY thing that came easy for me and my ds. I was on bedrest. He was born via emergency csection after living in my hostile uterus for 33 weeks. We lived above 10,000 feet he was in nicu for a month. 4.6lbs. on oxygen... and I didnt even get to meet him for over 48hrs after birth. He never had formula of any kind. he latched on w/o hesitation at our first meeting.
post #117 of 195
I voted "other." I found the first three weeks really hard, although I'm sure it was just because of being a first-time mom who was really hormonal. DD was a s-l-e-e-p-y baby, and I constantly stressed about whether she was getting enough milk.

Between ages 3 weeks and 6 months was an absolute breeze. Then I started getting mastitis every time she cut a tooth, which was agony. I swear I had at least 11 cases of mastitis between 6 months and 2 years. Pure stubborness kept me going through that! Right before her last set of teeth, my OB finally suggested swabbing DD's mouth with hydrogen peroxide, and I didn't get any more mastitis. We kept nursing with no more problems until 3.5 years.

Altogether, nursing DD was probably one of the best things I've done in my life, and one of the things I'm most proud of. If I hadn't been thoroughly educated beforehand about the benefits of bf, I know I never would have lasted.
post #118 of 195

Difficulties Nursing

My DD was a preemie, did not have a sucking reflex yet. It was SUCH a struggle to breastfeed her, I pumped and bottle fed her EBM for 5 weeks (until her due date), and my milk supply had already started to decrease. I cried, my mom and MIL told me to give up and use formula, I had a public health nurse visit me daily to help me latch, I tried a nipple shield and that FINALLY worked. I was so happy it was unbelievable. I wanted to give up physically, but in my mind, I just couldn't, and the fact that my mom and MIL were against me only strengthened my resolve to make it work (I'm stubborn that way). I nursed DD until she was 15 months, she self-weaned and I was 4 months pregnant with DS at that time. I'm so happy I didn't give up. I've helped another friend through a rough start with BFing as a result, and while I was in hospital with DS, I tried to help my "roomie", who was having her first baby. Unfortunately, the nurses at the hospital brought in formula to her when her baby was having difficulties latching, and although I tried to talk her out of it, sent her husband for a nipple shield (she was complaining of sore nipples), she had converted by the time she left the hospital. I have ranted a number of times about our local children's/maternity hospital because they SAY they are BF friendly, until you have problems and start actually requiring resources, then they push the formula on you to get you out of their hair. So on top of being exhausted, scared, worried, and having trouble, you also have to have resolve and tenacity in this city if you want to keep BFing (if you are having trouble).

I was so thankful that DS knew exactly what to do. He was a term baby - what a difference!

That turned into a rant. The gist of it is, you need to give BFing more than 2 days to determine whether it's going to work for you! It took 5 weeks for me, that's a LONG time when you're having trouble. Another girlfriend of mine with a preemie pumped for 10 weeks and was able to BF. If we can do it, many moms who give up could be successful BFers too.
post #119 of 195
Nursing was hard for us, for multiple reasons.

1) I had flat nipples...didn't know that until I tried to breastfeed the first time.
2) Bad advice from a nurse - I was told DD needed to cover the whole areola; well, she's almost 2, and still doesn't cover the whole areola since it's about the size of a teacup. So I spent a lot of time breaking good latches because you could see areola.
3) Different nurse ignored me as I said, from the confines of my hospital bed, "no pacifier" - after DD had had the paci for 5 days in the hospital, I didn't have the strength/willpower to take it away from her when we got home.

All in all, it took 8 weeks, a lactation consultant, and a nipple shield for us to get nursing down. If I hadn't gotten out of the Army, and had to go back to work at 6 weeks, I would not have continued nursing. I was lucky.
post #120 of 195
No, it was terrible from day one. I consider exclusively BFing my biggest accomplishment in life...it was that hard! I cried everyday for weeks.

Some of our problems were:
-tongue-tie
-jaundice
-refusal to latch
-low milk supply (no, really)
-poor pumping output
-dairy intolerance
-thrush
-flat nipples
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